Bitcoin Forum
December 07, 2016, 12:35:57 PM *
News: Latest stable version of Bitcoin Core: 0.13.1  [Torrent].
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 »  All
  Print  
Author Topic: Any update on these FPGA boards?  (Read 1923 times)
SyRenity
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 672


View Profile
June 12, 2011, 05:54:53 AM
 #1

I would like to do the long-term mining via these, to save on power.

Anyone knows if some are coming to market?
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1481114157
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481114157

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481114157
Reply with quote  #2

1481114157
Report to moderator
Crazy
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 168


View Profile
June 12, 2011, 05:55:50 AM
 #2

Have you looked at these: http://www.picocomputing.com/ex_series.html
newMeat1
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 210



View Profile
June 12, 2011, 06:06:46 AM
 #3

I'm working on a 1st prototype right now. I'm glad there's interest  Smiley. There are more advantages than just power savings: FPGAs will also be quiet and you don't need a motherboard slot. The only hardware you need is a USB port. And the speed will go up in the future (80 Mhash/s was just a first attempt, by fpgaminer). He's working on putting a second core on a Cyclone IV right now. They get 80 Mhash/s with about 10 watts-- a pretty damn good power ratio

Anyways, next weekend, I'll have all the parts to try the board out. If it works, I'll start selling them on Sunday for around $450. That's a $150 cut off the Terasic development board price. If it doesn't work, I'll hang my head in shame and go back to the drawing board. Haha

Let me also mention- there's no fan. It's a passive heat sink

Jonathan Ryan Owens
Donator
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 392



View Profile WWW
June 12, 2011, 06:19:02 AM
 #4

Quite expensive per MH/s. The market is so fickle and volatile right now, I don't know that there'd be any interest in FPGA beyond the cool / hobby factor unless costs were comparable on a 3 month timeline, including the power 5-10x power savings. As I calculate it, at current BTCUSD exchange, it would take 300 days to break even for $450 running 80 MH/s @ 10W.

Is there any probability that a 400-800 MH/s unit could be produced on a small scale for $300-400? I don't see it happening. Cool idea though.

newMeat1
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 210



View Profile
June 12, 2011, 06:21:21 AM
 #5

But you need to consider the other hardware costs. I mean, you could buy an old laptop on eBay for $20. As long as it has a USB port (or several...) and an internet connection, you're good to go. I've already found cheap suppliers for the power supply and cables, so those would be included in the package.

And if fpgaminer can get the speed up to, say, 120 Mhash/s, it starts to get really competitive...

Jonathan Ryan Owens
Donator
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 392



View Profile WWW
June 12, 2011, 06:44:56 AM
 #6

Can I see your maths?

Here's what I see..


newMeat1
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 210



View Profile
June 12, 2011, 06:50:42 AM
 #7

Um I haven't done any math yet. I'm just thinking in concepts. Long term, obviously, efficiency is gonna trump raw hashing power. The less efficient miners are gonna start dropping out.

Can I copy what you came up with? That's good.

itsagas
Jr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 59


View Profile
June 12, 2011, 06:55:26 AM
 #8

I'm working on a 1st prototype right now. I'm glad there's interest  Smiley. There are more advantages than just power savings: FPGAs will also be quiet and you don't need a motherboard slot. The only hardware you need is a USB port. And the speed will go up in the future (80 Mhash/s was just a first attempt, by fpgaminer). He's working on putting a second core on a Cyclone IV right now. They get 80 Mhash/s with about 10 watts-- a pretty damn good power ratio

Anyways, next weekend, I'll have all the parts to try the board out. If it works, I'll start selling them on Sunday for around $450. That's a $150 cut off the Terasic development board price. If it doesn't work, I'll hang my head in shame and go back to the drawing board. Haha

Let me also mention- there's no fan. It's a passive heat sink

I would be interested in multi-fpga boards if you have plans for that!
Jonathan Ryan Owens
Donator
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 392



View Profile WWW
June 12, 2011, 07:11:45 AM
 #9

Um I haven't done any math yet. I'm just thinking in concepts. Long term, obviously, efficiency is gonna trump raw hashing power. The less efficient miners are gonna start dropping out.

Can I copy what you came up with? That's good.

I think that difficulty is going to exceed the capability of any FPGA units going forward, and there isn't a feasible way to beat the ongoing and increasing difficulty using FPGA unless you can do 5 cores x ~80 MH/s for around $200 - $300. If there are existing multi core, commodity FPGA boards that could be relatively easily re-purposed for Bitcoin mining, well.. Then you have something. If those boards exist, the next step is to find out if you can get them at a discount on volume. You have to make money, right?

Electricity costs can definitely impact profitability, but to be competitive with commodity GPU mining, the scenario mentioned above would need to happen before there is any possibility of it being an alternative or successor to existing methods.


relmeas
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 125


View Profile
June 12, 2011, 07:16:26 AM
 #10

to save power? are you serious??

do you not understand that the computation power in bitcoin is used as the matter to compensate for growing computational capacity?

definitely I was not clear enough.

ok to say it in other words. It does not matter how much computation power you got per electricity consumption. eventually, to catch up, every other miner will get the same rig as you and then the only way to compete will be to increase the number of those rigs you got. hence the power consumption will grow to previous level because of rapid difficulty growth that is used to consume any computational power you can throw to it. No matter how much you optimize, bitcoin generation will always consume as much power as miners can put their hands on.

this is somewhat like the arms race... and it's just as pointless. but it can't be stopped. this is an intrinsic flaw of the bitcoin design unfortunately.
Ruxum
Jr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 39


View Profile
June 12, 2011, 07:23:42 AM
 #11

to save power? are you serious??

do you not understand that the computation power in bitcoin is used as the matter to compensate for growing computational capacity?

definitely I was not clear enough.

ok to say it in other words. It does not matter how much computation power you got per electricity consumption. eventually, to catch up, every other miner will get the same rig as you and then the only way to compete will be to increase the number of those rigs you got. hence the power consumption will grow to previous level because of rapid difficulty growth that is used to consume any computational power you can throw to it. No matter how much you optimize, bitcoin generation will always consume as much power as miners can put their hands on.

this is somewhat like the arms race... and it's just as pointless. but it can't be stopped. this is an intrinsic flaw of the bitcoin design unfortunately.

Yes, eventually low power, high density miners will win and GPU miners will lose out.  How many 4x6990 power hungry mining rigs can one put in a normal house?  how to deal with the heat?  the noise? 

How many cool, efficient and silent FPGA boards can be run? 

There will be a new technology and a tipping point to make GPU obsolete.  It may not be today, it may not be fpga, maybe it is ASIC?  but the day will come and power and efficiency will be a major factor.

Jonathan Ryan Owens
Donator
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 392



View Profile WWW
June 12, 2011, 07:27:44 AM
 #12

to save power? are you serious??

do you not understand that the computation power in bitcoin is used as the matter to compensate for growing computational capacity?

definitely I was not clear enough.

ok to say it in other words. It does not matter how much computation power you got per electricity consumption. eventually, to catch up, every other miner will get the same rig as you and then the only way to compete will be to increase the number of those rigs you got. hence the power consumption will grow to previous level because of rapid difficulty growth that is used to consume any computational power you can throw to it. No matter how much you optimize, bitcoin generation will always consume as much power as miners can put their hands on.

this is somewhat like the arms race... and it's just as pointless. but it can't be stopped. this is an intrinsic flaw of the bitcoin design unfortunately.

Yes, eventually low power, high density miners will win and GPU miners will lose out.  How many 4x6990 power hungry mining rigs can one put in a normal house?  how to deal with the heat?  the noise? 

How many cool, efficient and silent FPGA boards can be run? 

There will be a new technology and a tipping point to make GPU obsolete.  It may not be today, it may not be fpga, maybe it is ASIC?  but the day will come and power and efficiency will be a major factor.

Agreed. However, whatever that solution is, it's going to have to be a widely available technology, very likely with an alternate use (like ATI GPUs) or else there will be no other option. Also, unless the BTCUSD exchange rate stabilizes, and more merchants start accepting BTC, there's not much likelihood that any FPGA or ASIC commercialization projects will ever exist for the Bitcoin community. It will be limited to hobbyists.

nathanrees19
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 196



View Profile
June 12, 2011, 07:31:56 AM
 #13

It does not matter how much computation power you got per electricity consumption.

You are wrong. When the electrical cost exceeds the bitcoin value, many will stop mining, causing a difficulty drop. The price/difficulty will eventually settle at a point where the average miner breaks even.

FPGA and ASIC miners will be the only ones making a profit.
Transisto
Donator
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1624



View Profile WWW
June 12, 2011, 07:38:19 AM
 #14

ASIC is the way to go.

FPGA will always have a steep price point, cheap ASIC will be the one to make a dent in GPU's hashes.
Jonathan Ryan Owens
Donator
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 392



View Profile WWW
June 12, 2011, 07:38:46 AM
 #15

It does not matter how much computation power you got per electricity consumption.

You are wrong. When the electrical cost exceeds the bitcoin value, many will stop mining, causing a difficulty drop. The price/difficulty will eventually settle at a point where the average miner breaks even.

FPGA and ASIC miners will be the only ones making a profit.

What do you think the cost to develop a commercial FPGA and/or ASIC solution would cost? Perhaps some engineers should put their heads together and come up with realistic specs, an open source design, and the software to run it. I don't see that happening, and unless someone decides to invest a few hundred thousand dollars into specialized equipment, and the time to sell specialty FPGA and/or ASIC Mining devices, I don't think it's going to happen.

Where's the incentive for anyone to go down this road right now? In 3 months? Even if difficulty drops (it's not going to), there's too many people who will be willing to deal with the heat of GPU mining, and not enough people unified enough to develop an alternative that's viable for the Bitcoin community, at least as far as MH/s per $ goes.

Jonathan Ryan Owens
Donator
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 392



View Profile WWW
June 12, 2011, 07:42:05 AM
 #16

Good discussion on the economics of FPGA/ASIC mining...

http://forum.bitcoin.org/?topic=2362.0

Ruxum
Jr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 39


View Profile
June 12, 2011, 07:44:55 AM
 #17

Quote
Agreed. However, whatever that solution is, it's going to have to be a widely available technology, very likely with an alternate use (like ATI GPUs) or else there will be no other option. Also, unless the BTCUSD exchange rate stabilizes, and more merchants start accepting BTC, there's not much likelihood that any FPGA or ASIC commercialization projects will ever exist for the Bitcoin community. It will be limited to hobbyists.

Not true.  A dedicated mining board with ASICs will sell like hot cakes.  People will make huge arrays and farms and provide the mining power that the bitcoin system needs.  

It will be a business decision to buy them, they will pay for themselves in X weeks/months then they will have a lifetime of x months or years to make money.  After that they can be thrown away.  

Many are treating GPUs the same way now.  If you bought 50 6990 cards today, and they paid for themselves in 2 months.  Would you care about selling them on ebay in 2 years for $50?  Or would you just run them till they die or become obsolete (or no longer profitable)?

relmeas
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 125


View Profile
June 12, 2011, 07:45:12 AM
 #18

It does not matter how much computation power you got per electricity consumption.

You are wrong. When the electrical cost exceeds the bitcoin value, many will stop mining, causing a difficulty drop. The price/difficulty will eventually settle at a point where the average miner breaks even.

FPGA and ASIC miners will be the only ones making a profit.

which is exactly my point.

what prevents those FPGA/ASIC miners to get more of those things to increase their profits? And so the race begins.

Of course if only the chosen few will own those things they can have pretty small total power consumption but does that not defeat the purpose of a bitcoin as a system that is supposed to be p2p, decentralized system where everybody is supposed to take part in transaction processing? those chosen few with FPGA/ASICs will be the real centers of all transaction processing.

Or if general public gets to buy those FPGA/ASIC then again the one who owns the most of them, wins.

Unless of course the price of generated bitcoins no longer pays for the electricity spent... in which case we get decline in mining, difficulty adjustment, resume in mining, cycle repeats.
Ruxum
Jr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 39


View Profile
June 12, 2011, 07:48:22 AM
 #19

Quote

What do you think the cost to develop a commercial FPGA and/or ASIC solution would cost? Perhaps some engineers should put their heads together and come up with realistic specs, an open source design, and the software to run it. I don't see that happening, and unless someone decides to invest a few hundred thousand dollars into specialized equipment, and the time to sell specialty FPGA and/or ASIC Mining devices, I don't think it's going to happen.

Once a fully working and bug free FPGA design is ready it will take this to move to full ASIC production.  (from what I understand about it so far).

cost - $200k - $1.5MM
time - 6 - 18 months

Jonathan Ryan Owens
Donator
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 392



View Profile WWW
June 12, 2011, 07:55:49 AM
 #20

Quote

What do you think the cost to develop a commercial FPGA and/or ASIC solution would cost? Perhaps some engineers should put their heads together and come up with realistic specs, an open source design, and the software to run it. I don't see that happening, and unless someone decides to invest a few hundred thousand dollars into specialized equipment, and the time to sell specialty FPGA and/or ASIC Mining devices, I don't think it's going to happen.

Once a fully working and bug free FPGA design is ready it will take this to move to full ASIC production.  (from what I understand about it so far).

cost - $200k - $1.5MM
time - 6 - 18 months

So you have to find an investor who believes in Bitcoin enough to trust your estimates for difficulty in 6-18 months, and you'd have to ensure that you weren't late to market with a unit or units that were already behind the curve, right?

If Bitcoin continues down the road it's on, then yes - there will be dedicated ASIC bitmining units sold commercially. However, it's a long road from here to there.

Pages: [1] 2 »  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!