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Author Topic: [2016-10-20] British singer looks to Bitcoin tech for fair trade music business  (Read 320 times)
DooMAD
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October 20, 2016, 08:49:04 PM
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"Blockchain technology, which underpins the cryptocurrency bitcoin, may be revolutionising the fintech sector, but one Grammy award-winning artist hopes it can also disrupt the music industry.

The British singer, songwriter and producer Imogen Heap, who has collaborated with Taylor Swift and Deadmau5, is looking to blockchain to help bring about a “fair trade” industry that would give artists more rights over their music.

A keynote speaker at the Oslo Innovation Week festival in Norway, Heap said blockchain technology could “help breathe new life into an industry struggling to stay on top of piracy, low revenues and intellectual property minefields”."

http://www.irishtimes.com/business/british-singer-looks-to-bitcoin-technology-for-fair-trade-music-business-1.2835351

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October 21, 2016, 08:35:34 AM
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The British singer, songwriter and producer Imogen Heap, who has collaborated with Taylor Swift and Deadmau5, is looking to blockchain to help bring about a “fair trade” industry that would give artists more rights over their music.

A keynote speaker at the Oslo Innovation Week festival in Norway, Heap said blockchain technology could “help breathe new life into an industry struggling to stay on top of piracy, low revenues and intellectual property minefields”."

It's sad that these people are being so idiotic about this. Artists don't have any rights over musical recordings any more, it's finished. Everyone has equal copyright now, because the only viable way to maintain the 20th century copyright regime is through a form of totalitarianism that no-one (the artists included) would accept.

Musicians had a very short period of history during the 20th century when they could become fantastically wealthy. But it's over.

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October 21, 2016, 03:20:42 PM
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The British singer, songwriter and producer Imogen Heap, who has collaborated with Taylor Swift and Deadmau5, is looking to blockchain to help bring about a “fair trade” industry that would give artists more rights over their music.

A keynote speaker at the Oslo Innovation Week festival in Norway, Heap said blockchain technology could “help breathe new life into an industry struggling to stay on top of piracy, low revenues and intellectual property minefields”."

It's sad that these people are being so idiotic about this. Artists don't have any rights over musical recordings any more, it's finished. Everyone has equal copyright now, because the only viable way to maintain the 20th century copyright regime is through a form of totalitarianism that no-one (the artists included) would accept.

Musicians had a very short period of history during the 20th century when they could become fantastically wealthy. But it's over.

It's a sticky subject.  While it wouldn't be reasonable for artists to expect to become "fantastically wealthy", they should still be able to make a living out of it.  And given the choice, it's better for the artist themselves to own their own music rather than a record label.  Labels and record companies are the ones who have effectively turned copyright into a farce, such as extending copyright well beyond the artist's death and so on.  Personally I think 5-10 years of copyright is more than enough, then it should be considered public domain. 

But it's the issues around enforcement that currently makes the whole thing so repugnant.  Court cases pursuing minors for downloading Disney songs or other such extremes, but again, it's the big companies doing this, not the artists themselves.  That's the part the technology would hopefully and eventually help with.  Fewer middlemen parking on other peoples' material longer than warranted, fewer obnoxious legal cases and a healthier industry all round.

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