Bitcoin Forum
September 21, 2018, 04:44:51 PM *
News: ♦♦ New info! Bitcoin Core users absolutely must upgrade to previously-announced 0.16.3 [Torrent]. All Bitcoin users should temporarily trust confirmations slightly less. More info.
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Using mining hardware for non-Bitcoin applications  (Read 595 times)
alidorri
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 9
Merit: 0


View Profile
November 25, 2016, 01:37:51 AM
 #1

Dear All,

I am currently working on a research project and I am wondering if it is possible to buy mining hardware and use solely to solve some hash puzzles? In another word, I want to solve my own POW by Bitcoin mining hardware. Is this possible?

I mostly am in favor of ASIC hardware, since I need a small and  cheap miner for my research.


Regards
1537548291
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1537548291

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1537548291
Reply with quote  #2

1537548291
Report to moderator
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
sidehack
Legendary
*
Online Online

Activity: 1820
Merit: 1151

Curmudgeonly hardware guy


View Profile
November 25, 2016, 01:45:39 AM
 #2

Have you searched for the threads asking about the same question which have popped up pretty much monthly for the last couple years?

Bitcoin mining ASICs are really only good for solving double SHA256 on data in a specific format. You don't actually get the hash back out though; they only report the nonce which gives a hash corresponding to a specified difficulty threshold. Not terribly useful for anything else.

alidorri
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 9
Merit: 0


View Profile
November 25, 2016, 02:25:52 AM
 #3

Thanks for your reply and apologize if I re-asked a question.

My point is, can we  run our own BC. We give the hardware a hash and a difficulty and ask it to return the nonce that solved the POW. Is this possible?

Thanks
sidehack
Legendary
*
Online Online

Activity: 1820
Merit: 1151

Curmudgeonly hardware guy


View Profile
November 25, 2016, 03:09:47 AM
 #4

Look into the data formats that actually go into the chip. A lot of them take in a data and a midstate, which is derived from the first round of SHA256. The chip crunches all of that with incrementing nonces until it finds at least a diff-1 share. Most chips have a means of setting a target diff within the chip, so they won't return anything less than that (to save on tying up the IO lines with discards).

Yes, it's possible. If you have something that can be crunched down into the data formats the chips can take, and all you want back is a nonce, they'll do the job beautifully.

NotFuzzyWarm
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1568
Merit: 1090


Evil beware: We have waffles!


View Profile
November 27, 2016, 10:34:47 PM
 #5

Thanks for your reply and apologize if I re-asked a question.

My point is, can we  run our own BC. We give the hardware a hash and a difficulty and ask it to return the nonce that solved the POW. Is this possible?

Thanks
Yes you can run private blockchains if that is what you are referring to. There are lots already in use, for one, contract recording in some EU countries and probably in the USA as well along with the biggest app I'm aware of - Public lighting. As in tracking smart streetlights -- from installation location/crew/date/time to verifying data from the associated sensors that can be part of them eg cameras, microphones for shots triangulation...

As Sidehack said, it's just a matter of formatting the data and having nodes spread around for redundancy, then either opening the actual work to the public as some kind of reward or run data tanks to do it internally and keep it entirely private enterprise.

Can 'normal' miners be used for them -- don't know.

I will say this, last week one of my engineering blogs point to a whitepaper from Intel on Blockchain and it's application to the screamin' new FPGA line they are introducing. BTC of course gets mention but the paper dealt with blockchains for medical records, contracts and such. Not to mention a huge elephant in the room -- Banking. And before it's brought up as a negative -- why FPGA? Programmability with near etched-in-stone ASIC performance.

For bitcoin to succeed the community must police itself - Joshua Zipkin aka Joshua Alexander leaked AMT A1 miner skype chats
How a miner mfgr SHOULD operate: HaggsFIN trip to Canaan My info useful? Donations welcome! 1Fuzzyk398kDWVjuC5qPX5v6CjSkvbgAbd
-Support Sidehacks miner development. Donations to:   1BURGERAXHH6Yi6LRybRJK7ybEm5m5HwTr
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!