Bitcoin Forum
June 16, 2019, 04:05:38 AM *
News: Latest Bitcoin Core release: 0.18.0 [Torrent] (New!)
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register More  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Glacier: A step-by-step protocol for high-security cold storage of bitcoins  (Read 1046 times)
jhogan
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 6
Merit: 1


View Profile
February 11, 2017, 01:46:40 AM
Merited by vapourminer (1)
 #1

Many people are interested in storing their own bitcoins rather than using an online wallet, either for security reasons or on principle. 

But it’s harder than it looks.  Techniques such as offline key generation are great, but not bulletproof; sophisticated malware might use WiFi even if it’s disabled in the OS, or write keys to the hard drive for re-transmission later when the system is online.  Hardware wallets are great too, but how certain are you that an undiscovered vulnerability isn’t being exploited to grab your private keys over that USB cable?

When you’re dealing with large sums of money, relatively small risks such as these may feel unacceptably large -- and these examples are just the tip of the iceberg.

We made Glacier to help people navigate around these risks.  Glacier is a free open-source protocol that walks you through cold storage, step by step. It’s designed for people storing large amounts of bitcoin who are willing to invest some time and money for very high-security storage.

We’re happy to offer our beta release as a gift to the bitcoin community:
https://glacierprotocol.org
1560657938
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1560657938

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1560657938
Reply with quote  #2

1560657938
Report to moderator
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1560657938
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1560657938

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1560657938
Reply with quote  #2

1560657938
Report to moderator
1560657938
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1560657938

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1560657938
Reply with quote  #2

1560657938
Report to moderator
1560657938
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1560657938

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1560657938
Reply with quote  #2

1560657938
Report to moderator
HabBear
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 1008
Merit: 613


View Profile
February 11, 2017, 04:01:10 AM
 #2

Interesting offer. What about those that aren't familiar modifying or working with open source protocol?

A lot of people using online wallets do so not out of disregard for safety but because they aren't technically educated in how cold storage can be done.

What are you offering for those people?

Xester
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 994
Merit: 543



View Profile
February 11, 2017, 06:22:50 AM
 #3

Glacier is a good example of a bitcoin bank. Banks offer security and stability on which glacier is offering. This maybe just a start of the existence of bitcoin banks and more will open soon and offer protection and stability of your bitcoin for a fee or in normal banks it is called surcharge or service fee. The only thing left is they will offer bitcoin loans with interest to make it more like a bank. But as of now there are actually sites offering bitcoins loans to users with a corresponding interest rates. With just a few steps more if this two service will join together (savings and loan) then bitcoin banks will emerge.
jhogan
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 6
Merit: 1


View Profile
February 11, 2017, 06:32:25 AM
 #4

Interesting offer. What about those that aren't familiar modifying or working with open source protocol?

A lot of people using online wallets do so not out of disregard for safety but because they aren't technically educated in how cold storage can be done.

What are you offering for those people?

Glacier isn't a "protocol" in the sense of a language computers use to communicate with each other.  This is a "protocol" as in a written, step-by-step procedure for humans to follow.
sportis
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 322
Merit: 251


Veni, Vidi, Vici


View Profile
February 11, 2017, 01:05:44 PM
 #5

I have so few bitcoins, so as a hardware wallet is more than enough, but actually when I read the 'protocol' as you call it even though a little paranoid, without flattery I really impressed. I noticed that you have almost think all possible cases where is possible your equipment to be compromised or the data could be intercepted but if I'm not mistaken I did not see anything to protect the computer and smartphone screens from remote access that is a tempest attack. I repeat that maybe this is an obsolete security measure but this with faraday cages were some of the obligatory security measures, more than 10 years ago, when someone wanted to protect sensitive data stored in servers and computer screens were located in rooms with windows and maybe near public places and roads. So, I would like the @OPs answer in my comment
U2
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 681
Merit: 500


I used to be indecisive, but now I'm not sure...


View Profile
February 11, 2017, 01:15:49 PM
 #6


But it’s harder than it looks.  Techniques such as offline key generation are great, but not bulletproof; sophisticated malware might use WiFi even if it’s disabled in the OS, or write keys to the hard drive for re-transmission later when the system is online. 

? This isn't what cold storage is. If you're connecting that system to the internet any point after you generate a key it's now a hot wallet IMO. Know how to make a real cold storage computer? Take that WiFi card out and smash the shit out of it. Good luck having that crammed back in ever!
jhogan
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 6
Merit: 1


View Profile
February 12, 2017, 06:01:36 AM
 #7

I have so few bitcoins, so as a hardware wallet is more than enough, but actually when I read the 'protocol' as you call it even though a little paranoid, without flattery I really impressed. I noticed that you have almost think all possible cases where is possible your equipment to be compromised or the data could be intercepted but if I'm not mistaken I did not see anything to protect the computer and smartphone screens from remote access that is a tempest attack. I repeat that maybe this is an obsolete security measure but this with faraday cages were some of the obligatory security measures, more than 10 years ago, when someone wanted to protect sensitive data stored in servers and computer screens were located in rooms with windows and maybe near public places and roads. So, I would like the @OPs answer in my comment

Thanks!  The protocol does have steps to put smartphones or other devices in a Faraday bag during most of the protocol execution.  Appendix A (the list of "exceptional security measures" that are not part of the protocol proper) mentions larger Faraday cages (e.g. the entire room) as an additional measure one could take.
ClaimyMcClaim
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 91
Merit: 0


View Profile
September 28, 2018, 08:26:41 PM
 #8

wouldnt using 2 android smartphones be easier, cheaper and more convenient than 2 pcs?
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!