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Author Topic: A Good Surge Protector (relatively inexpensive)?  (Read 3683 times)
stick_theman
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June 17, 2011, 02:32:05 AM
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Hey folks, my surge protector crapped out on me so no mining tonight for me (I can sleep in quiet for once, Haaa).  I don't want to plug my miners directly into my wall.  Can you recommend a good surge protector for me?  I look through some threads and I found some people recommending a full UPS that's more than a couple hundred dollars! 

Does anyone know a decent surge protector that's relatively inexpensive?  What are you using for your miners?

Thanks,
J
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IamFuzzles
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June 17, 2011, 02:36:12 AM
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I found a UPS for $80 on Newegg. If you want to take care of your computer, mining or not, I recommend it. My brand is APC, it's worked pretty well so far. Though others might have better experience and better advice (which I'm always looking for myself). Then again, my room was wired by an idiot (who wires all outlets in series!?).
stick_theman
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June 17, 2011, 02:38:01 AM
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Thanks Fuzzles.  Looks like a UPS is the answer.   Smiley
IamFuzzles
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June 17, 2011, 02:43:35 AM
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Just look into reviews, you don't want to cheap out too much on one Tongue I've considered upgrading mine now that I've started mining.
stick_theman
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June 17, 2011, 02:45:01 AM
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Just look into reviews, you don't want to cheap out too much on one Tongue I've considered upgrading mine now that I've started mining.

Good call.  I am reading around.  Looks like this is a good bet.  APC's Back-UPS ES 750VA

http://www.crn.com/news/channel-programs/199702310/how-to-build-a-high-end-gaming-pc.htm;jsessionid=0lNX+GONAapJg15FWJ164g**.ecappj01
IamFuzzles
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June 17, 2011, 02:46:12 AM
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Nice choice, it's a good brand from my experience.
stick_theman
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June 17, 2011, 02:46:45 AM
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Nice choice, it's a good brand from my experience.

Thanks again, buddy!   Grin
rearwheels
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June 17, 2011, 03:21:07 AM
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Do note that particular UPS supports up to 450 Watts.
If you are drawing more power, than that UPS is not sufficient. For UPS that goes to > 1,000w, the price goes up much higher.

So a good surge protector may be a better option, IMO.
I'm using one from APC (http://www.apc.com/products/category.cfm?id=12)

It's a reputable brand and I've used their UPS for a number of years (non-mining PC) with good results (just swap in new batteries after 2 years).

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stick_theman
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June 17, 2011, 03:40:32 AM
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Thanks Rearwheels, I was thinking exactly the same thing.  I have 6990 miner machine and it is very power hungry. 
rearwheels
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June 17, 2011, 04:07:17 AM
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No problem.

I just found the one I'm using:
http://www.apc.com/products/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=P5B-UK

I have 3 rigs each with 3x5850s hooked up to this, plus a 3G wireless router.

Kill-a-watt says they are drawing about 1500watt. The plug is very slightly warm to the touch (the infra-red temperature gun says 38 deg C).

If I were to setup anymore, it will run on a separate loop.

Let us know what you got and a review. I think these are useful information.

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Meatball
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June 17, 2011, 07:25:54 PM
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Good UPS' are not cheap and skimping on UPS' or surge protectors is nuts.  Why people would risk $2000 worth of equipment to save $50 on power protection is beyond me.  UPS will keep your machine running for a few minutes and generally have better surge protection and power cleaning capabilities than a simple power strip/surge suppressor.  Make sure you read the fine print on UPS' though.  Most UPS model numbers have a number in it and it's usually listing the "Volt-Amps" it can handle, not the watts.  It's pretty cheesy because you'd see a big "UPS 500" plasted on the box, but that's 500 VA's and usually 300 or so watts.

With your three machines drawing 1500 Watts I'd suggest splitting them up to at least two different outlets/circuits with a surge suppressor or UPS on each.  To get an idea of what you're looking at, check out some of the Cyberpower models.  Cyberpower and APC are generally good brands to look into. 

If you don't want to spend that much on UPS', I'd get two really good power strips and once again, run them from different circuits.
compro01
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June 17, 2011, 08:45:36 PM
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Most UPS model numbers have a number in it and it's usually listing the "Volt-Amps" it can handle, not the watts.  It's pretty cheesy because you'd see a big "UPS 500" plasted on the box, but that's 500 VA's and usually 300 or so watts.

volt-amps is a useful figure (though it gets overemphasized in marketing), though you need to know what it means.  it specifies how much reactive load the unit can handle.

AC power is actually made up of 2 parts - real power (called P and measured in watts, this power is used and given off as heat, light, etc.) and reactive power (called Q and measured in volt-amps reactive.  this power is not actually consumed, it's used to charge capacitors and inductors.  it is send back at the other end of the circuit each cycle, but it still needs to be supplied), which add together (as vectors) and give you apparent power (called S and measured in volt-amps).

without correction, a switched mode power supply (like all computers use) has an pretty lousy power factor (real power divided by apparent power), potentially as low as 0.5.  That means if you're drawing 300 watts, you're also drawing 520VAR and thus the UPS has to provide 600VA.

APC assumes a power factor of 0.52.  cyberpower assumes 0.63.

realistically, the worst you're likely to see is about 0.7 (cheap end passive PFC, which basically just uses a big inductor to cancel out the big caps) and good supplies with active power factor correction can do 0.99.
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