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Author Topic: Intel on chip CPU SHA256 hashing announced  (Read 11258 times)
tstang
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August 05, 2013, 05:30:39 PM
 #21

Dree,


good insight and update !  Wink
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August 05, 2013, 07:00:35 PM
 #22

According to heise.de the new SHA256 instuctions will be introduced with Nights Landing (Xeon Phi) in 2014, and later with Skylake (follow up of Broadwell, which is the follow up of Haswell) - problably in 2015.

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August 05, 2013, 09:17:42 PM
 #23

I am not the most computer/crypto knowldgable person, but does this mean that someone has to write some code to allow people to run asics on intel processors? Will there a time in the future I can use my old intel Core i5 laptop for mining btc? (I know I can now but it is a huge waste of energy).

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August 05, 2013, 11:15:45 PM
 #24

I am not the most computer/crypto knowldgable person, but does this mean that someone has to write some code to allow people to run asics on intel processors?

Yes.

Quote
Will there a time in the future I can use my old intel Core i5 laptop for mining btc? (I know I can now but it is a huge waste of energy).

No.  While this would make a CPU "more" efficient, it wouldn't make it efficient enough.  Say your CPU was 3x (and it likely wouldn't be that much of a speed up) as fast and used the same power.  Would it really matter?
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August 11, 2013, 04:02:38 AM
 #25

i'm no expert on this but could cpu support for hashing also be used for the integration of encryption directly into operating systems/ software instead of mining?

i just had this strange idea of my cpus doing encryption of mails/chats etc. as a background process on-the-fly
or is this just a chimera and my thought approach is way off?  Tongue


 

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August 11, 2013, 08:39:13 PM
 #26

i'm no expert on this but could cpu support for hashing also be used for the integration of encryption directly into operating systems/ software instead of mining?

i just had this strange idea of my cpus doing encryption of mails/chats etc. as a background process on-the-fly
or is this just a chimera and my thought approach is way off?  Tongue
 

Your CPU can do that right now.  These instructions just improve the speed/efficiency of various encryption algorithms.  They don't make possible something that was impossible before.
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August 11, 2013, 09:05:04 PM
 #27

i'm no expert on this but could cpu support for hashing also be used for the integration of encryption directly into operating systems/ software instead of mining?

i just had this strange idea of my cpus doing encryption of mails/chats etc. as a background process on-the-fly
or is this just a chimera and my thought approach is way off?  Tongue
 

Your CPU can do that right now.  These instructions just improve the speed/efficiency of various encryption algorithms.  They don't make possible something that was impossible before.

In fact, your CPU is doing that right now. The very act of visiting these forums, posting, etc., already involves this encryption.
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August 12, 2013, 12:16:04 AM
 #28

thanks for your answers.
so with improving the efficiency/ speed of these operations new cpus are capable of doing more complex encryption processes in the background.
i try to reason what this could mean for the future development of encryption of communication/information especially with Prism/Tempora news in mind.

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August 12, 2013, 01:02:49 AM
 #29

thanks for your answers.
so with improving the efficiency/ speed of these operations new cpus are capable of doing more complex encryption processes in the background.
i try to reason what this could mean for the future development of encryption of communication/information especially with Prism/Tempora news in mind.

Not really.  SHA-256 isn't particuarly computationally intensive.  The average CPU is capable of tens of millions of hashes per second even without this instruction.  Far more than most users could ever hope to need.
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August 12, 2013, 01:47:17 AM
 #30

thanks for your answers.
so with improving the efficiency/ speed of these operations new cpus are capable of doing more complex encryption processes in the background.
i try to reason what this could mean for the future development of encryption of communication/information especially with Prism/Tempora news in mind.

Not really.  SHA-256 isn't particuarly computationally intensive.  The average CPU is capable of tens of millions of hashes per second even without this instruction.  Far more than most users could ever hope to need.

ah ok...what a pity, for a moment i hoped that could represent a glance at newer and safer encryption standards in the future.
so in the end it's more about independent network providers and in what form a software uses the algorithms to push progress in that direction.
nevermind...learnt something new again.
(i read a thread some months ago about the possibility of transporting information via the blockchain that's where my brooding came from)

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August 14, 2013, 03:40:05 PM
 #31

That's pretty cool, although it's not too much use until it's massively parallelized. AMD should add asic SHA hashing to their GPU's. Then we talk.

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ZirconiumX
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August 14, 2013, 05:27:41 PM
 #32

That's pretty cool, although it's not too much use until it's massively parallelized. AMD should add asic SHA hashing to their GPU's. Then we talk.

AMD CPUs would also make things interesting, especially in the server market.

The highest amount of AMD cores in a chip for the desktop market is 8. In the server market, it is 16, and you can get multi-chip motherboards. 64 cores, all with onboard SHA256 hashing.

With that amount of power potentially out there, SHA256 had better be secure...

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August 14, 2013, 05:33:48 PM
 #33

No good. GPU's have thousands of cores. In order for it to be of any real use, it would have to be parallelized to the hundreds if not thousands.

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November 27, 2013, 05:23:01 AM
 #34

It would be interesting to see AMD produce SHA256 or scrypt specific GPUs... I like to imagine they will, considering what steps they're taking to return to profitability. Shares of AMD trade around 3.50 for the last several months... association with bitcoin/cryptocurrency could be very good publicity for them and create another revenue stream.

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November 27, 2013, 07:49:48 AM
 #35

These will go nicely with those new motherboards built just for mining  Roll Eyes


Really these companies missed the boat for our neck of the woods, they're going after something else...

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mmeijeri
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December 21, 2013, 11:30:34 AM
 #36

It obviously doesn't compare to ASIC mining. I mean something like a KnC where you have, possibly, more transistors dedicated to SHA then an entire Intel CPU.

Are you suggesting the Intel implementation is less efficient (in GH/W) than in dedicated ASICs, or just that they are less powerful per die? Because I think what matters is how this will affect centralisation. If the incremental power needed to run a mining process in the background is less expensive than the BTC it yields, then many people might run it. And since there are so many general purpose computers in the world, this might mean significant percentage of the world's hashing power might come from PCs eventually. Dedicated miners would still run dedicated ASICs, but CPU mining might no longer be irrelevant from a decentralisation point of view.

ROI is not a verb, the term you're looking for is 'to break even'.
greenlion
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December 23, 2013, 05:29:29 PM
 #37

This really isn't about regular general-purpose CPU's suddenly becoming competitive for mining, but what it does open up is the possibility that in the future, a multitude of devices can be doing a tiny amount of mining in the background all the time.

A very plausible consumer application (that would really represent the holy grail in Bitcoin usability) would be a credit-card sized kinetically-powered lightweight node that functions as a hardware wallet signing transactions. SHA 256 hardware implementation in a CPU is not necessarily about mining, but could form the basis of a low-power signing implementation.

As far as Intel's motivation, it's kind of naive to assume it's Bitcoin specifically, because SHA-1 and SHA-2 are used in a tremendous amount of applications that have nothing to do with cryptocurrency.
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December 24, 2013, 07:54:09 AM
 #38

The guys over at freebsd had some words..
http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/12/we-cannot-trust-intel-and-vias-chip-based-crypto-freebsd-developers-say/

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