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Author Topic: Someone Random Trademarked "bitcoin" : Now we can't use the term?  (Read 35084 times)
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July 06, 2011, 07:28:04 PM
 #81

I hope the owner of bitcoin.com helps me defend the domain space... he has a lot more to lose.
bitcoin.com, that's $10 reg fee Satoshi should never have saved.
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sadpandatech
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July 06, 2011, 07:28:48 PM
 #82

Remember that decentralized currency.. what was it called? Yeah, I remember, people stopped using it because the government told them they couldn't write it's name down.

Well, arn't you clever....
Assuming you're being sarcastic. I apologize if you are not.


The concern is not within the currecny itself and someone being able to f&*k with the community. That will never happen.

 The concern with gov involvent can and will affect legitimate businesses that want to participate. I for one don't want some random trademark filer to have any potential to shut down a site that could house any amount of average joe's wealth. That would be very bad for business.

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July 06, 2011, 07:30:36 PM
 #83

I hope the owner of bitcoin.com helps me defend the domain space... he has a lot more to lose.
bitcoin.com, that's $10 reg fee Satoshi should never have saved.


Ahh, so true, except its been regged since 2000. ;p  Now, if Godaddy would just let us see for certain if the contract on it ends when the current registration does here at the beginning of 2012...

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July 06, 2011, 07:30:51 PM
 #84

I hope the owner of bitcoin.com helps me defend the domain space... he has a lot more to lose.
bitcoin.com, that's $10 reg fee Satoshi should never have saved.

Maybe he didn't Wink

Did anyone ask the owner of bitcoin.com if he was Satoshi?

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July 06, 2011, 07:35:13 PM
 #85

I hope the owner of bitcoin.com helps me defend the domain space... he has a lot more to lose.
bitcoin.com, that's $10 reg fee Satoshi should never have saved.

Maybe he didn't Wink

Did anyone ask the owner of bitcoin.com if he was Satoshi?


now, that would be one heck of a cool conspiracy. The site as far as I can tell from a snapshot of it in 2009 was one that was intended to facilitate partial and or per usage type payments for software in 'real time'. It is reg'd by go-daddy (but has reg info protection listed in Australia, likely through Go-daddy as well??) and was last hosted on an IP here in FL in an area that did not (to best of my knowledge) have any nationialy advertised hosting, suggesting the owner lives some where clsoe by.

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July 06, 2011, 07:47:07 PM
 #86

I'm surprised you guys are bothered by this. The registrant isn't going to be able to enforce the trademark, so why not save your energy and ignore him?
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July 06, 2011, 07:48:39 PM
 #87

 

Ahh, so true, except its been regged since 2000. ;p  Now, if Godaddy would just let us see for certain if the contract on it ends when the current registration does here at the beginning of 2012...

How does it normally work when valuable domains expire? Is there a known second when they become available and the person with the best internet connection and a lightning script gets the name?

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July 06, 2011, 07:50:57 PM
 #88

I'm glad as hell that someone discovered this.  Could have been a real headache.  Roger, I'll assume you weren't doing research on trademarking 'Bitcoin' yourself, right?  You were probably researching a product or service with 'Bitcoin' in the name.  Anyway, we all owe Roger a big thank you for finding this.

I was thinking about trademarking flexcoin  (since we own it,  I wanted to trademark it so no one tries to illegally use a variation of the domain name or snail mail.. whatever...  and go on a phishing expedition...  I know it won't stop thieves.. but it's just another roadblock)  ....  and when I was there I searched for bitcoin for kicks and was unpleasantly surprised to see that garbage...


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July 06, 2011, 07:52:08 PM
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Ahh, so true, except its been regged since 2000. ;p  Now, if Godaddy would just let us see for certain if the contract on it ends when the current registration does here at the beginning of 2012...

How does it normally work when valuable domains expire? Is there a known second when they become available and the person with the best internet connection and a lightning script gets the name?

pretty much...  There is more to it these days, with Verisgin being the main portal for Registrants of .com names and many registrants assigned under them. The last time I read the fine print on the ability to snag up domains 'before' they open up was more than 5 years ago.

If you're not excited by the idea of being an early adopter 'now', then you should come back in three or four years and either tell us "Told you it'd never work!" or join what should, by then, be a much more stable and easier-to-use system. - GA
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July 06, 2011, 08:01:40 PM
 #90

I'm surprised you guys are bothered by this. The registrant isn't going to be able to enforce the trademark, so why not save your energy and ignore him?

You really don't think that if one were established as the trademark holder on Bitcoin they couldn't cause greif for a domesticly run business that was buying, selling or trading Bitcoin? I'd like to think in the long run the business would win out but at what cost? That is what bothers me about it..

If you're not excited by the idea of being an early adopter 'now', then you should come back in three or four years and either tell us "Told you it'd never work!" or join what should, by then, be a much more stable and easier-to-use system. - GA
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July 06, 2011, 08:39:41 PM
 #91

The domains are not the core problem people....  the problem is literally the use of the word "bitcoin'  that technically as it stands now might be viewed as trademark infringement. 

Post it on your blog?  You're violating a trademark...   say "we accept bitcoins"  no you don't until you pay the guy a licence fee....   get the point?


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July 06, 2011, 08:51:05 PM
 #92

The domains are not the core problem people....  the problem is literally the use of the word "bitcoin'  that technically as it stands now might be viewed as trademark infringement. 

Post it on your blog?  You're violating a trademark...   say "we accept bitcoins"  no you don't until you pay the guy a licence fee....   get the point?




Exactly!  Thank you!

If you're not excited by the idea of being an early adopter 'now', then you should come back in three or four years and either tell us "Told you it'd never work!" or join what should, by then, be a much more stable and easier-to-use system. - GA
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July 06, 2011, 08:55:15 PM
 #93

Is there anyway to see whois on company who applied for trade mark?

Edit: nevermind, found it.. what I was hunching about isn't true
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July 06, 2011, 08:58:01 PM
 #94

yea compare the company name with bitcoin.com ... but you guys are SO not thinking big....  it's not the domain name!!   That trademark is gonna spread to every single printed article,  blog story,  business that accepts bitcoins... ect ect...

It can potentially shut down the whole operation by large...  yea it doesn't apply outside of the US... but that's a freaking huge market... 

this has to stop now.


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July 06, 2011, 09:02:56 PM
 #95

yea compare the company name with bitcoin.com ... but you guys are SO not thinking big....  it's not the domain name!!   That trademark is gonna spread to every single printed article,  blog story,  business that accepts bitcoins... ect ect...

It can potentially shut down the whole operation by large...  yea it doesn't apply outside of the US... but that's a freaking huge market... 

this has to stop now.



I'm not sure how TMs work and how opensource project fit into it. I'm thinking OS should have some sort of brand protection from such things, given that OS community was established way before.
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July 06, 2011, 09:07:38 PM
 #96

People are up in arms about a trademark yet fail to see the much larger problem.  Bitcoin does not, and never will, have a patent on its intellectual property.  That's like Coca-Cola trademarking their name but allowing anyone to use their recipe for free.

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July 06, 2011, 09:11:16 PM
 #97

The approach to take in fighting the trademark is that bitcoin is a generic term for describing actual bitcoins and as such is already in the public domain...

"Trademark rights can also be lost through genericity. Sometimes, trademarks that are originally distinctive can become generic over time, thereby losing its trademark protectionKellogg Co. v. National Biscuit Co., 305 U.S. 111 (1938). A word will be considered generic when, in the minds of a substantial majority of the public, the word denotes a broad genus or type of product and not a specific source or manufacturer. So, for example, the term "thermos" has become a generic term and is no longer entitled to trademark protection. Although it once denoted a specific manufacturer, the term now stands for the general type of product. Similarly, both "aspirin" and "cellophane" have been held to be generic. Bayer Co. v. United Drug Co., 272 F.505 (S.D.N.Y. 1921). In deciding whether a term is generic, courts will often look to dictionary definitions, the use of the term in newspapers and magazines, and any evidence of attempts by the trademark owner to police its mark."


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July 06, 2011, 09:20:19 PM
 #98

The approach to take in fighting the trademark is that bitcoin is a generic term for describing actual bitcoins and as such is already in the public domain...

"Trademark rights can also be lost through genericity. Sometimes, trademarks that are originally distinctive can become generic over time, thereby losing its trademark protectionKellogg Co. v. National Biscuit Co., 305 U.S. 111 (1938). A word will be considered generic when, in the minds of a substantial majority of the public, the word denotes a broad genus or type of product and not a specific source or manufacturer. So, for example, the term "thermos" has become a generic term and is no longer entitled to trademark protection. Although it once denoted a specific manufacturer, the term now stands for the general type of product. Similarly, both "aspirin" and "cellophane" have been held to be generic. Bayer Co. v. United Drug Co., 272 F.505 (S.D.N.Y. 1921). In deciding whether a term is generic, courts will often look to dictionary definitions, the use of the term in newspapers and magazines, and any evidence of attempts by the trademark owner to police its mark."




Thats pretty much the whole point. I for one don't care so much about the Bitcoin community having a trademark since it should not be neccesary. The problem is somone else having potential to cause harm to Bitcoin users or businesses because they have one.


And yea, the .com thing was a side track from the whole trademark issue. Thouse, certainly a .com would be much more succeptable to trademark dmg than a .net, etc as was pointed out.

And, trademark and patent are two very different things and I see where people are confusing the issue of this trademark as it relates to the Bitcoin itself and talking about the software, though not applicaple, would fall under patent law if it were.

If you're not excited by the idea of being an early adopter 'now', then you should come back in three or four years and either tell us "Told you it'd never work!" or join what should, by then, be a much more stable and easier-to-use system. - GA
It is being worked on by smart people. -DamienBlack
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July 06, 2011, 09:21:01 PM
 #99


so basically the guys who created bitcoin dropped the ball in respect to trademarking the name.


so how did bittorrent and other opensource programmers do this?

maybe we can just avoid all this nonsense - change the name - and do it right this time.
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July 06, 2011, 09:22:27 PM
 #100


Ahh, so true, except its been regged since 2000. ;p  Now, if Godaddy would just let us see for certain if the contract on it ends when the current registration does here at the beginning of 2012...

How does it normally work when valuable domains expire? Is there a known second when they become available and the person with the best internet connection and a lightning script gets the name?

Pretty much any name worth picking up from a drop is grabbed by sites that auction them off to the highest bidder.  You can place backorders on names.  For names with backorders, they go to the highest bidder to ones with backorders.  That is the gist of it anyway.
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