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Author Topic: $7 per pack.  (Read 747 times)
MoonShadow
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July 06, 2011, 09:39:27 PM
 #1

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jul/04/iceland-considers-prescription-only-cigarettes

I don't smoke, but if that is the rate before the proposed regs...

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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Jack of Diamonds
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July 07, 2011, 03:52:24 AM
 #2

Cigarettes already cost 4.40€ per pack of 20 in many EU countries which is about $6.5.
So in that sense it's nothing shocking.

Then again, gas also costs about 1.5 to 1.7€ per litre, which is 6.8€ per gallon ($9.7).

Haven't followed american politics lately, but I'm pretty sure $10/gallon gas would start a violent revolution in the US.
In Europe it's the normal state of affairs.

Life aint cheap in Europe...

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MoonShadow
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July 07, 2011, 04:03:00 AM
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Haven't followed american politics lately, but I'm pretty sure $10/gallon gas would start a violent revolution in the US.


Violence, yes.  A revolution, no.  Americans have become a kept populace, in general, over the course of my lifetime.  Middle class America has become materialistic and soft.  So much so that the only thing that I can imagine getting them off of the couch would be the threat of loss; loss of their comforts, loss of their jobs, loss of their pensions.  And even if that happens, far too many have been asleep for far to long to understand what would be happening, and would join the riots without a cause.  If that day comes, I'll be hanging out with my family at my Mom's farm.  The meek shall inherit the Earth.

Woe to anyone who sneaks upon the farm looking for a free meal without permission, however.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
MtRev
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July 07, 2011, 07:48:07 AM
 #4

It's $9 in NYC, so it's nothing new to me, but try to find a Chinese friend, ask him/her to hook you up. The Chinese in every were have connections to cheaper cigs.. . trust me. Wink

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Drop me a message; will work for BTC, LTC & PPC =]
fascistmuffin
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July 07, 2011, 08:16:30 AM
 #5

Read up on Urban Sprawl on wikipedia, it explains why Americans would get mad at higher gas prices. To summarize, and from personal experience, a lot of Americans cannot get anywhere without a car because a lot of cities are designed like a bowl of shit. To add to the shitty design, most can't/don't find work within 10 miles of where they live. Source: I live in a suburb of Kansas City.

While you're at it, read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_American_streetcar_scandal. Gas needs to skyrocket by a few hundred percent to make average Americans realize how screwed we are in the long run. Public transportation just isn't an option in a lot of towns anymore. In my town the nearest bus stop is over three miles away and the buses don't run anywhere useful.
genjix
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July 07, 2011, 08:59:12 AM
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To echo the guy above, it's well worth reading Jane Jacobs and New Urbanism on Wikipedia. One good book is called 'The Option of Urbanism'
bitplane
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July 07, 2011, 09:22:02 AM
 #7

Here in the UK I have lived without my own car for the last 3 years, and I don't miss it. When I was in Denver not having a car was like not having a toilet. I felt like I'd be charged for vagrancy for walking, y'know, using my legs to get to work in the morning. Call me crazy but I think that legs ought to be the default mode of transport.
MoonShadow
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July 07, 2011, 01:49:06 PM
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Read up on Urban Sprawl on wikipedia, it explains why Americans would get mad at higher gas prices. To summarize, and from personal experience, a lot of Americans cannot get anywhere without a car because a lot of cities are designed like a bowl of shit. To add to the shitty design, most can't/don't find work within 10 miles of where they live. Source: I live in a suburb of Kansas City.

I disagree with this position.  Americans can find housing within 10 miles of their work, they just don't.  I did that, intentionally, four years ago and have ridden a bicycle to work for over 3 years.  Ironicly, I just bought a car for myself yesterday.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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