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Author Topic: Dear Drug Lord Douche bags:  (Read 16844 times)
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July 13, 2011, 12:47:05 PM
 #61

Dear Drug Lord Douche Bags:

Isn't in funny when your payments get intercepted by law enforcement? Isn't it hilarious when your own couriers abscond with your cash? It must be difficult to guard all your loot- I mean after all there is only so much cash you can stuff up your ass in a condom.

You can build submarines, but you're too stupid to understand Bitcoin.  Hiding, storing and transferring money discretely and securely apparently is beyond your capabilities. You must be much more skilled at manufacturing poison and chopping off heads. 

Thank you for not polluting our community with your presence. Know this: We, a bunch of nerds, could do your job almost effortlessly.  The only reason we don't is because we are not parasites and because it's so entertaining to watch you fail.

Sincerely,
Bitcoin Nation
that could be the most stupid display of what bitcoin is able to do. even to a crowd that we (certaintly not i) dont want to attract .
fun facts.. "drug lord douche bags" can hire/rent/"own" a "nerd" to do their work if they needed to.
i really do not understand what was on your mind when you started this post..


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July 13, 2011, 12:59:45 PM
 #62

i've never had the honor.
yours maybe?
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July 13, 2011, 05:53:52 PM
 #63

I don't think the Bitcoin economy is anywhere near large enough to sustain serious money laundering. Any operation worth considering would end up being many times the size of the rest of the economy. That's not what you want if you're looking to launder money.

Not yet. But all a drug organization has to do is to open above-board Bitcoin exchanges in countries where they want them.

If drug organizations ever did start using Bitcoin, you would notice.

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July 13, 2011, 09:24:40 PM
 #64

It would be nice if they started using it, then the price could go up 10x easily if over 400billion was laundered in 1 year. sure the bitcoin market might be killed for a few weeks, but the price would make me retire before i get my first real job.

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July 13, 2011, 11:09:59 PM
 #65

I think the fact no drug lord has been caught using bitcoin yet speaks for itself.

 Huh

Am I missing something and the DEA actually held a press conference showing off a tonne of cocaine and a couple of usb sticks ?
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July 14, 2011, 12:54:01 AM
 #66


if i was a druglord douchebag i prolly wouldn't need bitcoin.



You probably would. Properly used, it enables a 100% anonymous payment method for customers with internet access.

Why do you think silkroad dealers prefer BTC?


LOL @ SILK ROAD!

those noobs aren't druglords.

that site is shit. and soon to be gone.

How do you intend to shut down a site over TOR?

all it takes is staged buyers. but fortunately for silk road's sake it's too small and amateur to interest anyone with an agenda.

like i said - it's a shit site. with shitty overpriced drugs.

Overpriced? I disagree. Maybe the street drugs are, but the benzo's (Xanax, Valium) are about the same as I was paying from a "street pharmacist" that was giving me deals cuz he's been a friend of mine since before he started selling 'em...
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July 14, 2011, 02:06:32 AM
 #67

Overpriced? I disagree. Maybe the street drugs are, but the benzo's (Xanax, Valium) are about the same as I was paying from a "street pharmacist" that was giving me deals cuz he's been a friend of mine since before he started selling 'em...

That reminds me, medical supplies in the US are overpriced and corrupt. id bet you paid lower than you would at a real "pharmacy" and your friend probably still made a little profit.

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July 14, 2011, 02:31:28 AM
 #68

Smugglers are heroes.  

They resist the coercive State to help supply meet demand, a most noble cause.

We owe them our thanks for their bravery.


Quote
http://townhall.com/columnists/walterewilliams/2011/04/27/smugglers_as_heroes


Smugglers are heroes of sorts. The essence of what a smuggler offers is: "Government tyrants want to either prevent or interfere with peaceable voluntary exchange among individuals. I can reduce the impact of that interference." Let's look at smuggling, keeping in mind that not everything illegal is immoral and not everything legal is moral.  

Leading up to our War of Independence, the British, under the Navigation Acts, had levied taxes on a wide range of imports. One of those taxes was on molasses imported from non-British islands. John Hancock, whose flamboyant signature graces our Declaration of Independence, had a thriving business smuggling an estimated 1.5 million gallons of molasses a year. His smuggling practices financed much of the resistance to British authority. In fact, a joke of the time was "Sam Adams writes the letters (to newspapers) and John Hancock pays the postage."

Hancock's smuggling, as well as that of many others, made the people of our nation better off by providing cheaper prices for molasses used for making rum. British oppressors were worse off by having lower tax revenues.

In 1920, the 18th Amendment, prohibiting the production, distribution and sale of alcoholic beverages in the United States, went into effect. It had wide public support. In my opinion, no case can be made for stopping another person from enjoying beer, wine and whiskey. That's oppression, but along came heroes to the rescue. The ink hadn't dried on the 18th Amendment before smugglers started smuggling beer and whiskey from Canada and Mexico. Ships lined up along our shores, just beyond the three-mile limit, to off-load whiskey onto speedboats. Smugglers and bootleggers spared millions of Americans from do-gooder oppression.

While the smuggler qua smuggler is my hero, several important negative effects surround his activity. Smuggling is illegal. It becomes a sometimes-nasty criminal enterprise because those who engage in it tend to be people with an overall lower regard for the law. Since smuggling is illegal, disputes must be settled with guns and violence instead of courts. Plus, police and other public officials are corrupted. Worse of all is the reduced respect for laws by the public at large. After the 18th Amendment's repeal, virtually all of the crime and corruption associated with Prohibition disappeared.


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July 14, 2011, 02:34:09 AM
 #69

being a drug lord myself- i find this thread offensive... haters gon' hate

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July 14, 2011, 02:43:30 AM
 #70

Smugglers are heroes. 

They resist the coercive State to help supply meet demand, a most noble cause.

We our them our thanks for their bravery.

Actually true.  They are the 'front line' do the true dirty deeds, good point, neat article, I like.

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