Bitcoin Forum
December 11, 2016, 04:25:51 AM *
News: Latest stable version of Bitcoin Core: 0.13.1  [Torrent].
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 »  All
  Print  
Author Topic: fanless heatsink...finally some quiet mining?  (Read 1604 times)
trouserless
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 65


View Profile
July 13, 2011, 01:02:59 PM
 #1

http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/89710-the-fanless-spinning-heatsink-the-heatsink-is-the-fan

Looks like the big brains at Sandia National labs have come up with a new heatsink that actually rotates as it heats up on an "air bearing" spinning a sort of metal impeller that draws cool air in and expels hot air.  Too bad it looks like it only operates on an horizontal surface.
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
pdawg
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 252


View Profile
July 13, 2011, 01:06:39 PM
 #2

Pure awesomeness.....

tosku
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 368



View Profile WWW
June 27, 2012, 02:06:40 AM
 #3

Almost a year later, I find this article: http://www.extremetech.com/computing/131656-the-fanless-heatsink-silent-dust-immune-and-almost-ready-for-prime-time

The idea sure looks cool on video, but I wonder how much a CPU cooler like this would cost.

Skude.se/BTC - an easier way to request your daily free coins!
Koooooj
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 75



View Profile
June 27, 2012, 03:35:34 AM
 #4

I saw something like this on Tom's Hardward a few days ago! I wonder when it'll be available to purchase

Just one more reason I want to work at Sandia!
gamebak
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 103


View Profile
June 27, 2012, 03:44:22 AM
 #5

impresive heatsink, but it seems a little big don't you agree ?
silentseawolf
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 29


View Profile
June 27, 2012, 04:41:07 AM
 #6

Rule 4: there is no such thing as a heat sink that is too big, especially on a custom rig.

you have too look at it in terms of potential, not practical.  and by the look of it, there it LOTS of potential there, lol. Cheesy
tosku
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 368



View Profile WWW
June 27, 2012, 08:59:22 AM
 #7

Do you think this thing has to be positioned horizontally? It looks in the video like the fan & heat sink part would fall of if you tilted it.

Skude.se/BTC - an easier way to request your daily free coins!
silentseawolf
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 29


View Profile
June 27, 2012, 04:45:30 PM
 #8

naa, it would be impossible to sell a product where you could only mount it on a horizontal plane.  the motor shaft looks like it would hold it on, and when its running it floats on air, so that would not be a problem of orientation.
Fiyasko
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1428


Okey Dokey Lokey


View Profile
June 27, 2012, 06:21:25 PM
 #9

naa, it would be impossible to sell a product where you could only mount it on a horizontal plane.  the motor shaft looks like it would hold it on, and when its running it floats on air, so that would not be a problem of orientation.
LOL YES IT WOULD BE A PROBLEM!

Gavity is everything!

http://bitcoin-otc.com/viewratingdetail.php?nick=DingoRabiit&sign=ANY&type=RECV <-My Ratings
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=857670.0 GAWminers and associated things are not to be trusted, Especially the "mineral" exchange
nedbert9
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 252

Inactive


View Profile
June 27, 2012, 08:50:36 PM
 #10




very cool stuff.  What about uses in heat exchangers?

Let's say, what is the possible impact to AC units with fixed radiators?
RDWHAHB
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 24


View Profile
June 27, 2012, 11:12:20 PM
 #11

naa, it would be impossible to sell a product where you could only mount it on a horizontal plane.  the motor shaft looks like it would hold it on, and when its running it floats on air, so that would not be a problem of orientation.
LOL YES IT WOULD BE A PROBLEM!

Gavity is everything!

well harddrives use an airbearing to allow the arm (head?) to float over the spinning platter at a ridiculously small distance, and I don't believe there is any active control to adjust downward force to correct for a change in orientation.

The air bearing upward force is balanced by a downward magnetic force. As long as these "springs" are very stiff relative to the weight of the impeller, it shouldn't be an issue.
Fiyasko
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1428


Okey Dokey Lokey


View Profile
June 27, 2012, 11:34:22 PM
 #12

Yeah... IF the springs are relativly stiff, But at the same time, if you put the impeller on it's side, Wouldnt you spilt the overall durability in half by putting majority of the weight down onto lets say 3/6 springs?

HDD's are different, The arm is a very solidly connected peice, And yes, It does use an air bearing to stay in the correct place, However, a HDD "disc" is firmly held in place and is Much Much lighter than these proposed impellers..

Where as with these impellers it would seem that simply adding a little bit more weight could make it grind along the bottom of it's rotary platform, I could be totally incorrect tho, But my main point is that the impellers weight is going to be Poorly heldup if just connected straight to the motor (like they show in the demo)

Thoughts?

http://bitcoin-otc.com/viewratingdetail.php?nick=DingoRabiit&sign=ANY&type=RECV <-My Ratings
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=857670.0 GAWminers and associated things are not to be trusted, Especially the "mineral" exchange
RDWHAHB
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 24


View Profile
June 28, 2012, 12:13:47 AM
 #13

I said springs in quotes because there's no springs.

Relevant info from Q&A with the inventor:

Quote
Q: Does the air bearing heat exchanger only work in a horizontal orientation? Or are other angles possible?

    JK: As discussed in the white paper, a downward restoring force many times that of the gravitational force acting on the mass of the heat-sink-impeller is generated by attractive interaction of the permanent magnet rotor and the high magnetic permeability stator. For this reason the device can operate in any orientation and the air gap varies little as a function of orientation angle.
bighecks
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 23


View Profile
June 28, 2012, 12:53:47 AM
 #14

I might want to get one of these my computer gets to much dust Sad
auctioneeeeer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 249


View Profile
June 28, 2012, 12:59:13 AM
 #15

Sign me up for these Smiley
CoinLab
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 270


1CoinLabF5Avpp5kor41ngn7prTFMMHFVc


View Profile WWW
June 28, 2012, 01:16:12 AM
 #16

Almost a year later, I find this article: http://www.extremetech.com/computing/131656-the-fanless-heatsink-silent-dust-immune-and-almost-ready-for-prime-time

The idea sure looks cool on video, but I wonder how much a CPU cooler like this would cost.

Cool video!  I'd love to have these in my home gaming rig.
Fiyasko
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1428


Okey Dokey Lokey


View Profile
June 28, 2012, 01:35:03 AM
 #17

I said springs in quotes because there's no springs.

Relevant info from Q&A with the inventor:

Quote
Q: Does the air bearing heat exchanger only work in a horizontal orientation? Or are other angles possible?

    JK: As discussed in the white paper, a downward restoring force many times that of the gravitational force acting on the mass of the heat-sink-impeller is generated by attractive interaction of the permanent magnet rotor and the high magnetic permeability stator. For this reason the device can operate in any orientation and the air gap varies little as a function of orientation angle.
*bows* I goodsir have been Served, And i verymuch enjoyed my food!, Thankyou!

http://bitcoin-otc.com/viewratingdetail.php?nick=DingoRabiit&sign=ANY&type=RECV <-My Ratings
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=857670.0 GAWminers and associated things are not to be trusted, Especially the "mineral" exchange
tjb0607
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 26


i love jade harley


View Profile WWW
June 28, 2012, 05:39:38 AM
 #18

Well the heatsink would obviously be considerably heavier than a fan, so it would take some more power. Probably not too much, but still a thing to put into consideration.

1tjbo6o7SDHzpuxybYkx3ZDa7RqeUUmgw
phantitox
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 370



View Profile
June 28, 2012, 06:37:02 AM
 #19

do not think it necessarily big as seen in the video, if it is much more efficient as say that the current coolers, in theory the end product should be much smaller.
tosku
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 368



View Profile WWW
June 28, 2012, 09:35:00 AM
 #20

Well the heatsink would obviously be considerably heavier than a fan, so it would take some more power. Probably not too much, but still a thing to put into consideration.

Newton's second law of motion:

Quote
The acceleration a of a body is parallel and directly proportional to the net force F acting on the body, is in the direction of the net force, and is inversely proportional to the mass m of the body, i.e., F = ma.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton's_laws_of_motion

The heavier heatsink would only require more force to spin when it's accelerating. Once it's spinning at top speed, the weight is not of significant importance.

Skude.se/BTC - an easier way to request your daily free coins!
Pages: [1] 2 »  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!