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Author Topic: Add this guy to the list of names of whom Satoshi Nakamoto is.  (Read 1205 times)
Phinnaeus Gage
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September 03, 2013, 05:26:28 AM
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-hbxxLgpsQ
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September 03, 2013, 07:55:24 AM
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http://iang.org/papers/


Bitcoin & Gresham's Law - the economic inevitability of Collapse
This is the Conclusion written in October 2011 (which seems to be the most recent)

Conclusion
The security of Bitcoin relies on a single party or cartel of parties not being able to dominate the capacity for mining.
Therefore Bitcoin relies on a large and diversified network of miners. Yet, the proof-of-work mechanism, the
existence of free entry and no limits to honesty ensure that botnets will cause a breach of Gresham's Law: stolen
electricity will drive out honest miners. Once botnets take over, criminality increases, honest users decamp and
collapse follows.
Hence, the requirement of diversification is broken by Bitcoin's very mechanism to make diversification work fairly:
proof-of-work. Attempts to repair the design generally result in the replacement of Bitcoin with some other
architectural base.
The Bitcoin economy is highly vulnerable to attack. If an agent were to decide to attack Bitcoin, he has several
strategies available. One could operate a mining botnet and slowly lower the Bitcoin market price by regularly selling
small amounts of bitcoins with a declining price. As the honest miners are squeezed out, further manipulations of the
Bitcoin system are possible. A second strategy is to pump & dump to generate volatility. Both strategies result in the
honest mass market decamping for other fields. Once the market takes on the taint of criminality, the Feds are
encouraged to shut it down by targeting the exchange makers; fear of criminality and the appearance of the Feds
work together to cause the collapse.
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September 03, 2013, 10:13:37 AM
 #3

monochrom: Ian Grigg about the Flower Currency Project (1)

Tulips?  Huh



Ok, after watching it, actually what he proposes is like Ripple (the original from 2004), or the "Digital Coin" proposal from "Money as Debt II" (for which there exists no proof of concept or even just a paper how it would exactly work though).

https://localbitcoins.com/?ch=80k | BTC: 1LJvmd1iLi199eY7EVKtNQRW3LqZi8ZmmB
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September 03, 2013, 10:15:00 AM
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Sounds like from AnonyMint

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September 03, 2013, 10:23:19 AM
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monochrom: Ian Grigg about the Flower Currency Project (1)

Tulips?  Huh



Ok, after watching it, actually what he proposes is like Ripple (the original from 2004), or the "Digital Coin" proposal from "Money as Debt II" (for which there exists no proof of concept or even just a paper how it would exactly work though).

maybe satoshi is one of the RIpple devs :-)
many smart btc devs are working for ripple, maybe 1 is satoshi in disguise.
manfred
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September 03, 2013, 06:06:10 PM
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I would not say so, Ian Grigg, is a financial cryptography expert, and has submitted testimony papers to the U.S. Senate.

This is the papers page for Ian Grigg. Each of these papers has been written and circulated with some seriousness in various fora. Many have been published in some formal academic conference or journal. Sorted in most recent first.

  • Philipp Güring and Ian Grigg: Bitcoin & Gresham's Law - the economic inevitability of Collapse
    Events overtook this paper. We had hoped to present it at some interesting conference, but with the development of full-scale attacks on the Bitcoin economy, it is better out now, so as to explain the reasons. October-December 2011
  • Ian Grigg: An Open Audit of an Open Certification Authority
    resented as an invited talk at the 22nd Large Installation Systems Administration Conference (LISA 2008) 13th November 2008
  • Ian Grigg The Market for Silver Bullets
    This paper is part of a group of papers emerging from an investigation into Information Security and Signalling.
  • Ian Grigg The Ricardian Contract
    Kindly presented by Mark Miller at First IEEE International Workshop on Electronic Contracting, (WEC) 6th July 2004
  • Pareto-Secure (postscript)
    Pareto-Secure was one of the three papers presented in the founding issue of Advances in Financial Cryptography . As editor, publisher and chief gopher that was an easy decision for me!
  • Triple Entry Accounting (PS)
    A new paper that attempts to meld our ground-breaking digital issuance innovations with classical accountancy. In Financial Cryptography it is an article of faith that double entry bookkeeping has taken a broadside from the digital certificate, and is expected to sink any year now.
  • James Nesfield and Ian Grigg Mutual Funds and Financial Flaws
    This paper was submitted as testimony to the U.S. Senate's finance subcommittee during hearings on the mutual funds scandal , 27th January 2004.  
  • Ian Grigg Financial Cryptography in 7 Layers
    The paper was presented at Financial Cryptography 2000 (FC00) and was originally published in the Proceedings of Financial Cryptography Fourth International Conference, FC 2000 Anguilla, British West Indies, February 21-24, 2000, Springer-Verlag LNCS 1962.
  • Ian Grigg Digital Trading
    It was presented at the first Digital Money conference, London, October 1997, and appeared in the November 1997 issue of Virtual Finance Report.  
  • Ian Grigg and C Petro Using Electronic Markets to Achieve Efficient Task Distribution
    It was presented at Financial Cryptography 1997
  • Ian Grigg, Critique on the 1994 EU Report on Prepaid Cards
    published in The Journal of Internet Banking and Commerce ,  
  • Ian Grigg, The Effect of Internet Value Transfer Systems on Monetary Policy
    his paper was written in April-June 1996 as primary assessment for Professor Michael Kuczynski's International Financial Systems elective in the London's MBA programme.  

Update from Phinnaeus Gage post below
.
Phinnaeus Gage
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September 03, 2013, 08:08:02 PM
 #7




http://web.archive.org/web/20000902184233/http://iang.org/
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September 03, 2013, 08:53:01 PM
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Quote
Bitcoin & Gresham's Law - the economic inevitability of Collapse

I for one can't believe Satoshi would have written that paper.
The argument is really quite weak - it's a bit like saying nobody will accept gold as payment because tinpot dictators in third world countries control the gold mines (and it's not really connected to Gresham's Law).

Or, suppose for argument's sake that there was a group of gangsters who went around the world using their muscle to take over all the Bitcoin mining rigs by force. The activity would of course be illegal, but just for argument's sake again, suppose they could not be stopped. What impact does this have on Bitcoin users (as opposed to miners)? Nothing.
Now suppose that these gangsters decided they hated Bitcoin and shut all the mining rigs down. The difficulty drops, other people around the world can mine with anything to hand as a result (I'm ignoring the nightmare scenario of *immediate* off-lining of huge hashing power - that's a different issue). What else could they do? Arguments like this:
Quote
One could operate a mining botnet and slowly lower the Bitcoin market price by regularly selling small amounts of bitcoins with a declining price. As the honest miners are squeezed out, further manipulations of the Bitcoin system are possible. A second strategy is to pump & dump to generate volatility.
.. are patently false; Bitcoin has already experienced and continues to experience huge volatility, but that is clearly not a dealbreaker as it displays other properties making it a superior form of money. The worst thing about this analysis is it doesn't even discuss the far more important potential attack: the double spend attack. The gangsters could certainly try that.
But people forget that the double spend attack is not a "network blows up scenario" or an "evil genius takes all the bitcoins" scenario either. To quote Satoshi from the whitepaper:
Quote from: SN
We consider the scenario of an attacker trying to generate an alternate chain faster than the honest chain. Even if this is accomplished, it does not throw the system open to arbitrary changes, such as creating value out of thin air or taking money that never belonged to the attacker. Nodes are not going to accept an invalid transaction as payment, and honest nodes will never accept a block containing them. An attacker can only try to change one of his own transactions to take back
money he recently spent.

The given scenario of botnets is exactly the same as that of the gangsters. This argument is weak and Satoshi already addressed it to a great extent before Bitcoin was ever released.


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Phinnaeus Gage
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September 03, 2013, 09:03:00 PM
 #9

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financial_cryptography

Quote
Financial cryptography is frequently seen to have a very broad scope of application. Ian Grigg sees financial cryptography in seven layers [1], being the combination of seven distinct disciplines: cryptography, software engineering, rights, accounting, governance, value, and financial applications. Business failures can often be traced to the absence of one or more of these disciplines, or to poor application of them. This views FC as an appropriately crossdiscipline subject. Indeed, inevitably so, given that finance and cryptography are each built upon multiple disciplines.
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September 03, 2013, 09:12:52 PM
 #10

I'm waiting for this guy to weigh in: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=846
manfred
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September 04, 2013, 08:04:13 AM
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It was a "Work in Progress" in the 2000 papers page and not listed on the last update of it on October-December 2011.
That is the straight link http://web.archive.org/web/20010107145600/http://www.iang.org/papers/universal_value.html

Meanwhile some extracts from his rants page from the time (April 2001).

Quote
My rants!

First up, and alone until I can find the others, is a brave attack on the world of banking, derived from a discovery of the perfect MP3:

    rtprio(1) plays mp3s, hangs record companies, and passes death sentence on the banks
I don't write too many rants, about one a year. Here's one forced by exigencies of waiting for the inevitable, as my first hurricane approached...
    It's Sunday and there's a hurricane coming...
You had to be there!

Sadly, my first ever rant is lost to prosterity, even though it was a cypherpunks-posted mini-epic, and we know that all cypherpunks posts are archived... Therein lies the tale of another rant, which, sadly, lacks that critcal element, inspiration, and, until then,

Enjoy!

Also
Quote
I wonder what it is like when my borrowers have dozens of payment systems at their disposal?
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September 04, 2013, 10:41:43 AM
 #12

The first video is from 20 May 2006, this is the phase 2 video is was uploaded on 26 Nov 2006 very interesting on 3:50
Is Bitcoin phase 3?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLwg6ZAmBwE
.
At the time he was writing Java crypto functions for the now defunct cryptix project http://www.cryptix.org/ for which Jeroen C. van Gelderen = Satoshi also wrote some code, in my opinion.
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September 04, 2013, 12:56:21 PM
 #13

The first video is from 20 May 2006, this is the phase 2 video is was uploaded on 26 Nov 2006 very interesting on 3:50
Is Bitcoin phase 3?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLwg6ZAmBwE
.

bitcoin miners need to produce moar flowerzzz

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