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Author Topic: Which countries have the cheapest electricity?  (Read 14843 times)
Timo Y
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January 21, 2011, 12:12:28 PM
 #21

Set up your own windmill for your household needs and generate bitcoin only when there is excess electricity at peak times.

Then you are getting your electricity for free.

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January 21, 2011, 12:20:29 PM
 #22

In the UK there are alternatives to the standard residential fee structure. One of those provides very cheap off-peak electricity in exchange for slightly increased peak prices. For most people it's not a good deal, but for someone who wanted to use their computer normally in the day but mine all night it would be perfect.
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January 21, 2011, 02:46:58 PM
 #23

Set up your own windmill for your household needs and generate bitcoin only when there is excess electricity at peak times.

Then you are getting your electricity for free.

Thats a pretty cool idea. Too bad about the hw going unused for most of the time!
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January 21, 2011, 04:15:42 PM
 #24

Residentail rates are $0.05 kwh and industrial are $0.08 kwh CDN, here in Vancouver, Canada. The entire province runs on hydro-electric.

That sounds backwards, as the larger customers tend to have bigger discounts.  Why is it this way, is residential electric subsidised?

Well... I'm not speaking as a large industrial client. It's well known that large industrial customers (eg. Teck-Cominco aluminium smelter) get super sweet deals on bulk power. I'm only speaking as someone who maintains an office in a light industrial area of town.

In a related note, our power utility is considering offering a different pricing structure that involves the installation of real-time meters and discounts during off-peak times, combined with surcharges during peak times. I think this has been done quite effectively in other parts of the world.
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January 21, 2011, 05:25:43 PM
 #25

What would be nice is if you could sell "space heater" appliances to people who were already going to use the electricity anyway for home heating, which also happened to generate Bitcoins at the same time.

Price per kWh = $0.00

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January 21, 2011, 05:37:53 PM
 #26

In the UK there are alternatives to the standard residential fee structure. One of those provides very cheap off-peak electricity in exchange for slightly increased peak prices. For most people it's not a good deal, but for someone who wanted to use their computer normally in the day but mine all night it would be perfect.

For consumer use, time-of-use pricing would provide a nice benefit. [edited]

When equipment is dedicated for mining -- as long as the cost of peak electricity is below the revenue from mining during that same period of time, mining will not likely be curtailed for any part of the day whatsoever.

Time-of-use electric pricing irrelevant — Mining is 24x7:   http://www.bitcoinminer.com/post/2858427974/time-of-use-pricing

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January 21, 2011, 06:56:01 PM
 #27

What would be nice is if you could sell "space heater" appliances to people who were already going to use the electricity anyway for home heating, which also happened to generate Bitcoins at the same time.

Price per kWh = $0.00

It's true when comparing to space heaters, but not true when comparing to heat pumps, which can move 2~4 times energy than what they consume.
humble
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January 21, 2011, 09:35:44 PM
 #28

The space heater model is the one I'm working with. My industrial space is divided into several spaces. One of which is fully heated by a miner. Another of which is about 50% heated by a miner. I'm thinking of adding some to the main space but noise is a factor. Gotta think it through a bit more. Summer is going to be a problem...
bitcoinex
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January 31, 2011, 01:11:58 AM
 #29

Russia: ~$0.0667 per kW/h

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January 31, 2011, 05:51:59 AM
 #30

Russia: 0.023$/kWh.
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January 31, 2011, 06:14:34 AM
 #31

China:$0.09 kwh, about for residential.

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MoonShadow
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February 01, 2011, 08:40:34 AM
 #32

Russia: 0.023$/kWh.

Wait, What?

Where is this?

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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February 02, 2011, 11:32:44 PM
 #33

Russia: 0.023$/kWh.

Wait, What?

Where is this?

Do not know about Russia, but in Ukraine it's currently about 0.032$/kWh but the gov promised to rise it in near future  Angry
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April 13, 2011, 05:38:54 PM
 #34

Not in near future, they'll become raising now. Just do the math - electric systems are a part of global economic system. The main goal today is to optimize the network/in simple words unified way to deliver the power of electricity to your home/ and lower the costs of el. companies/respectively their losses/ and to raise the bills for the end users.

Yes, in the near future prices for kWh will be too close one to each other for different countries. They''ll be also higher.
alexdrans
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May 13, 2011, 04:42:36 PM
 #35

Just took a look at my last bill and it averaged out to about .12 USD/kWh here in Korea. From a low of about .05 USD/kWh for the first 100 kWh, .11 for the 2nd 100, .17 for the 3rd 100, to .25 for the 4th 100. That's the last bill I got before I started mining so I'm pretty curious to see the next one.

There is no way that I could afford my lifestyle with your energy rates.

Car gas is also pretty expensive.

I should point out that I only pay about 6% income tax, which is negligible in my mind compared to what I paid in Canada, so it balances out. Medical care and food are pretty cheap here as well.

Where do you live?
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May 14, 2011, 12:19:39 PM
 #36

It's not looking so good here in Western Australia with Synergy we have something like 20.42 or 40.14 cents per kilowatt hour depending on the time of day and if its summer or winter and 10.78 cents/kWh off peak 9pm to 7am.  http://www.synergy.net.au/docs/SmartPower.pdf

So it looks like if I want to keep mining I can only do it offpeak and even then I should be looking at getting the highest amount of per kilowatt hashing rather than the highest hash rate. Damn I just bought a 6950 as well. Maybe I should undervolt and underclock my CPU and only mine offpeak but even the offpeak rate isn't cheap here. Other than that I may have to start thinking about biological computing that I could just feed kitchen scraps. You know FPGA's in DNA etc.

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jasonk
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May 15, 2011, 03:44:32 AM
 #37

In Northern California, I pay 11 cents per Kwhr.  California average is 15c i think...  I live a few miles away from a 676Mw Dam (Shasta Dam).

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May 15, 2011, 09:26:49 AM
 #38

I don't know about other countries (I'm just an ignorant American :-), but Wyoming supposedly has the least expensive electricity in the U.S..  I pay after taxes and fees, I pay about $0.09/kWh here.

Really? 0.09/kwh is the cheapest in the USA? That stinks!

Up in ontario average rate is about 0.07/kwh

It dips down to 0.05 at night and up to 0.09 during the day I believe.

My condominium building is free however Wink I am saving about $200/month right now!
caston
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May 15, 2011, 05:16:54 PM
 #39

So what should I do if electricity is so expensive here? I'm seriously heart broken now that I know what synergy charge.  Cry


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May 15, 2011, 07:56:50 PM
 #40

I was looking over the tariffs for Utah,

Business rates are around $0.026Kwh offpeak and $0.04 Kwh onpeak.

   But ...

I dont get the charge they have called a "Power charge" that is per KW

I am guessing that is in addition to the "Energy charge" that is measured by Kwh


If anybody is familiar with this Industrial pricing structure let me know what they mean by that Power charge, that is listed per KW


http://www.rockymountainpower.net/content/dam/rocky_mountain_power/doc/About_Us/Rates_and_Regulation/Utah/Approved_Tariffs/Rate_Schedules/Large_General_Service_1_000_kW_and_Over_Distribution_Voltage.pdf


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