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Author Topic: Which countries have the cheapest electricity?  (Read 14869 times)
Anonymous
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January 20, 2011, 07:11:19 PM
 #1

Has anyone moved there just because they wanted to mine bitcoins?  Cheesy

I think they might look at you strangely if you applied for a visa and your reason was bitcoin mining....
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January 20, 2011, 07:23:36 PM
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I don't know about other countries (I'm just an ignorant American :-), but Wyoming supposedly has the least expensive electricity in the U.S..  I pay after taxes and fees, I pay about $0.09/kWh here.
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January 20, 2011, 07:31:55 PM
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France has massively subsidized nuclear power, meaning that their energy is so cheap and abundant they sell electrons to their neighbors.Smiley

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Anonymous
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January 20, 2011, 07:40:17 PM
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France has massively subsidized nuclear power, meaning that their energy is so cheap and abundant they sell electrons to their neighbors.Smiley

That makes sense.
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January 20, 2011, 08:14:48 PM
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If you're being serious then go to an oil rich developing country like Iran. They have lots of oil to burn for domestic electricity so it costs next to nothing (even poor citizens easily afford it). Energy consumption in Iran is 6.5 times that of global average because people don't give a fuck as it's nearly free.


Note how generation exceeds consumption by far,


Quote
It is estimated that 18.5% of electricity generated in Iran is wasted before it reaches consumers due to technical problems. Electric power wastage hit $1.1 billion in 2006.

This is a country that does not care about resource-conservation due to over-abundance.
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January 20, 2011, 08:28:13 PM
 #6

France has massively subsidized nuclear power, meaning that their energy is so cheap and abundant they sell electrons to their neighbors.Smiley
Our energy might be abundant, but it's definitely not that cheap.
0.11 EUR/kwh.

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January 20, 2011, 08:47:41 PM
 #7

I don't know about other countries (I'm just an ignorant American :-), but Wyoming supposedly has the least expensive electricity in the U.S..  I pay after taxes and fees, I pay about $0.09/kWh here.

Last I checked, my residential electric rates were under 8 cents per KWH.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
Anonymous
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January 20, 2011, 10:23:33 PM
 #8

I don't know about other countries (I'm just an ignorant American :-), but Wyoming supposedly has the least expensive electricity in the U.S..  I pay after taxes and fees, I pay about $0.09/kWh here.

Last I checked, my residential electric rates were under 8 cents per KWH.

Thats cheap!
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January 20, 2011, 10:32:58 PM
 #9

I don't know about other countries (I'm just an ignorant American :-), but Wyoming supposedly has the least expensive electricity in the U.S..  I pay after taxes and fees, I pay about $0.09/kWh here.

Last I checked, my residential electric rates were under 8 cents per KWH.

Thats cheap!

I live about five miles from a 80 megawatt hydroelectric plant.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McAlpine_Locks_and_Dam

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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January 20, 2011, 10:49:03 PM
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The Electricity pricing Wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_pricing#Global_electricity_price_comparison shows the price per kWh in over two dozen countries.  The top three of those where electricity is the cheapest are Spain, Canada and Finland, each of which show electricity under $0.07 US per kWh. Germany, the Netherlands, Italy and Denmark are at the end of that list with electric rates over $0.30 US per kWh.

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Though the U.S. average is now a little over $0.10 US per kWh, according to a U.S. Department of Energy monthly report http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/epm/table5_3.html , the residential average is $0.12 US.  On the high end, excluding areas outside the contiguous U.S., are the Northeast states of New York, Connecticut and New Jersey with rates approaching $0.20 US.  On the low end are the Pacific Northwest states Washington and Idaho which are under $0.09 US.  As a rule of thumb, commercial rates can be calculated as being about 90% that of residental, though the report provides specific rates for each state.

http://www.bitcoinminer.com/post/2361900289/where-to-mine-prices-of-electricity

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January 20, 2011, 11:37:37 PM
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In Russia (excepting Moscow & St.Petersburg)  1kWh = $0.06..$0.07
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January 20, 2011, 11:45:01 PM
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All Europe prices: http://www.energy.eu/
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January 20, 2011, 11:49:03 PM
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I don't have numbers, but Australia is said to have very cheap electricity.

Looking forward to quantum computing so we can have qubitcoins.
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January 20, 2011, 11:55:19 PM
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Just took a look at my last bill and it averaged out to about .12 USD/kWh here in Korea. From a low of about .05 USD/kWh for the first 100 kWh, .11 for the 2nd 100, .17 for the 3rd 100, to .25 for the 4th 100. That's the last bill I got before I started mining so I'm pretty curious to see the next one.

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January 21, 2011, 12:06:10 AM
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Just took a look at my last bill and it averaged out to about .12 USD/kWh here in Korea. From a low of about .05 USD/kWh for the first 100 kWh, .11 for the 2nd 100, .17 for the 3rd 100, to .25 for the 4th 100. That's the last bill I got before I started mining so I'm pretty curious to see the next one.

There is no way that I could afford my lifestyle with your energy rates.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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January 21, 2011, 12:15:39 AM
 #16

Just took a look at my last bill and it averaged out to about .12 USD/kWh here in Korea. From a low of about .05 USD/kWh for the first 100 kWh, .11 for the 2nd 100, .17 for the 3rd 100, to .25 for the 4th 100. That's the last bill I got before I started mining so I'm pretty curious to see the next one.

Is high speed Internet free in S. Korea? I heard the HS Internet adoption rate is very high there.

Access cost is important to the mining too.
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January 21, 2011, 12:24:21 AM
 #17

Just took a look at my last bill and it averaged out to about .12 USD/kWh here in Korea. From a low of about .05 USD/kWh for the first 100 kWh, .11 for the 2nd 100, .17 for the 3rd 100, to .25 for the 4th 100. That's the last bill I got before I started mining so I'm pretty curious to see the next one.

Is high speed Internet free in S. Korea? I heard the HS Internet adoption rate is very high there.

Access cost is important to the mining too.

No it's not free but it's pretty cheap as far as I know. We pay about $30 a month which is cheaper than what I paid in Canada last time I lived there.  Adoption is super high. You can also find PC rooms, think internet cafes, stuffed full of pretty decent gaming rigs basically everywhere you go. And by everywhere I mean if you're standing somewhere and there aren't 2-3 within sight, or at least within a block of you, it's kind of strange. Those you can use for under a $1 an hour last time I checked.

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January 21, 2011, 12:41:54 AM
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Just took a look at my last bill and it averaged out to about .12 USD/kWh here in Korea. From a low of about .05 USD/kWh for the first 100 kWh, .11 for the 2nd 100, .17 for the 3rd 100, to .25 for the 4th 100. That's the last bill I got before I started mining so I'm pretty curious to see the next one.

There is no way that I could afford my lifestyle with your energy rates.

Car gas is also pretty expensive.

I should point out that I only pay about 6% income tax, which is negligible in my mind compared to what I paid in Canada, so it balances out. Medical care and food are pretty cheap here as well.

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January 21, 2011, 03:59:40 AM
 #19

Residentail rates are $0.05 kwh and industrial are $0.08 kwh CDN, here in Vancouver, Canada. The entire province runs on hydro-electric.
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January 21, 2011, 05:24:33 AM
 #20

Residentail rates are $0.05 kwh and industrial are $0.08 kwh CDN, here in Vancouver, Canada. The entire province runs on hydro-electric.

That sounds backwards, as the larger customers tend to have bigger discounts.  Why is it this way, is residential electric subsidised?

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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