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Author Topic: Sucking precious power out of Multi-Rails PSU. (PIC)  (Read 1251 times)
Transisto
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August 16, 2011, 02:57:05 AM
 #1

I can't count the number of time I had to do this.

Reroute the 4pin into PCI-e.

That PSU, PowerColor 500w, dedicate a whole 18amp for the CPU


http://i.imgur.com/1HvAd.jpg
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haploid23
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August 16, 2011, 03:08:19 AM
 #2

this was something i was thinking about doing, but wasn't sure if it's safe for the PSU or video card, and i also didn't know the pin assignments. can you show which CPU cable pins to go into which pci-e cable pins?

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August 16, 2011, 03:27:31 AM
 #3

Well ,,,
Black = ground
Yellow = 12v
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August 16, 2011, 09:30:05 AM
 #4

I dont get it, what's wrong with an adaptor that you get when you buy the video card?

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August 16, 2011, 09:58:05 AM
 #5

I dont get it, what's wrong with an adaptor that you get when you buy the video card?
that adapter that comes with the video card pulls power from a peripheral cable, which is probably a different power rail than the CPU power rail on a multi rail PSU. you want to take advantage of the CPU's rail as well since the CPU (for dedicated miners) shouldn't be pulling that much power.

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August 16, 2011, 02:56:49 PM
 #6

I can't count the number of time I had to do this.

Reroute the 4pin into PCI-e.

That PSU, PowerColor 500w, dedicate a whole 18amp for the CPU


http://i.imgur.com/1HvAd.jpg
not sure if i see it right,but you tap the p4 wire?

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August 16, 2011, 03:16:16 PM
 #7

not sure if i see it right,but you tap the p4 wire?

Using the 2nd 4pin for the CPU is never a requirement unless you plan on going 100w +
(miners use Celerons and 25w cpu of the like.)

I have a few 4pin grabbed from dead PSUs that I sometime plug with a molex to power the CPU.

This way I can use the whole 8pin and use them as PCI-e ,,, I am now to use a tool to make custom pci-e without any tampering to the PSU. (warranty safe)
plastic.elastic
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August 17, 2011, 04:15:19 PM
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not sure if i see it right,but you tap the p4 wire?

Using the 2nd 4pin for the CPU is never a requirement unless you plan on going 100w +
(miners use Celerons and 25w cpu of the like.)

I have a few 4pin grabbed from dead PSUs that I sometime plug with a molex to power the CPU.

This way I can use the whole 8pin and use them as PCI-e ,,, I am now to use a tool to make custom pci-e without any tampering to the PSU. (warranty safe)

I understand that, but how did you use your 8pin EPS rail? you tap your PCI-E on it or did you use an adapter 8pin EPS -> PCI-E connector.

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Transisto
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August 17, 2011, 11:48:21 PM
 #9

Stripping the insulation ~1 cm and twisting the other wire on it.
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August 18, 2011, 03:24:49 AM
 #10

Ah i get it now.

How do you know if the PSU reserves a rail for the CPU? Do you ahve to open it?

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vapourminer
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what is this "brake pedal" you speak of?


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August 20, 2011, 01:23:22 PM
 #11

the PSU manual may specify what strings are on what rail.

for example my antec TP 550 new manual (pdf link) tells exactly whats on what.
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August 20, 2011, 04:26:48 PM
 #12

Why not stay away from multi rail psu's? Only buy single rail psu's?
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what is this "brake pedal" you speak of?


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August 20, 2011, 07:30:04 PM
 #13

there are pros and cons to each.

multi rail: Pro - overcurrent protection on each rail. a short on one string (rail) will shut the PSU down before the string wiring can catch fire.

multi rail: Cons - have to balance the rails

single rail: Pros - no load balance worries. jump start your jeep!

single rail: Cons - fire if something shorts big time.. 100 amps on a single wire = bad news.

BTW internally most all "multi rail" PSUs have one 12v source (which also powers 3.3v and 5v rails), each rail has  overcurrent protection though.



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