Bitcoin Forum
December 16, 2017, 06:54:23 PM *
News: Latest stable version of Bitcoin Core: 0.15.1  [Torrent].
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 »  All
  Print  
Author Topic: How many of these mistakes are you making?  (Read 1421 times)
brownbear
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 91


View Profile
February 21, 2014, 08:34:11 AM
 #1

Here is a list of some of the most common mistakes and misconceptions people have about e-mail usage. The purpose of this list is to help users become more aware of the security and privacy risks involved in using e-mail, especially from the big e-mail providers.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

MISTAKE 1: I use a popular e-mail provider

Hotmail, Gmail and Yahoo are some of the worst e-mail providers available. They are run by the largest IT corporations in the world where e-mail is just a segment of their business rather than the main service, and because they are very popular they focus more in acquiring and maintaining a large user base rather than offering basic security and privacy features you could expect from a decent service. As an example, until not long ago none of them supported secure connection (SSL/TLS) while you were logged in, so if you were checking your e-mails from a public Wi-Fi, café or hotel anyone could easily intercept and read your messages.



MISTAKE 2: I think only the recipients can read my messages

When you send e-mails they reach the destination almost instantly, but to accomplish that they often travel through many machines, networks and even countries, and they can be easily intercepted by anyone who is in between such as network administrators, corporations and governments. It is similar to someone opening up your mail, reading it, copying it, putting it back in the envelope and forwarding it to you, except that with e-mail it leaves no traces that the message was intercepted.



MISTAKE 3: When I empty the trash bin I believe my messages were erased forever

When you empty the trash bin all you do is to erase the messages from yourself, from your own sight, but in fact they are still there stored in your e-mail provider's servers in the form of backup for an undisclosed period of time, possibly forever. That means that in the future all those messages you thought had been erased years ago can be leaked, exposed and used against you, some of which you certainly would't like to become public.



MISTAKE 4: I think it is great that my e-mail account is free

Nothing is for free and your e-mail account is no different. While you don't pay the companies directly for it with money you do it with your privacy, which worths much more to them.

They track everything they can possibly obtain about you, including to whom you communicate, how often you communicate, the contents of your messages, your physical location, and other personally identifiable information. This is not limited to e-mails only. Since those companies also operate other business such as search engines, software development, social networks and online advertising, they often extend their tracking methods to those services and combine your data obtained from all of them to build a gigantic profile of yourself.

Now imagine all things you've ever searched during the last years combined in a single database that could be exposed or given to authorities at any time. That's what they have about you. And why do they do it? For two reasons: to sell you intrusive advertising based on your usage behavior, and to comply with government surveillance programs.

When they say they collect "certain types of personal information about our users" to "improve our service", that's exactly what they mean.



MISTAKE 5: I own my own messages, they are mine

In the US e-mails lose their status of protected communication after 6 months, which means that after this period the US government doesn't need a court order to break its secrecy, a single request (a subpoena) is enough for them obtain it. Note that you don't have to be in the US for that to happen, as long as you use a provider that has servers in the US, or your messages are routed through the US, you can expect that to happen. This applies to all messages you keep in your account, as well as the messages you deleted but they keep them in the form of backups for more than 6 months (which they all do).



MISTAKE 6: I think cryptography is unecessary

What is really unecessary is to send your messages exposed like a postal card so anyone can read them. Everybody uses e-mail these days and it is impossible to avoid the risks it poses, but there are many ways to protect against those risks, one of them is by using cryptography. Cryptography allows you to encode all your messages so only the recipient can decode them.

You have easily available to you high level cryptography for free that only brings benefits to you. It takes minutes to set up and and once configured it can be set to automatic, so you don't have to worry about enabling or choosing it every time. Another benefit is that it is compatible with any e-mail provider and you can still communicate with people who don't use cryptography if you want.

If you don't use cryptography you automatically indicate to others that you don't care about your privacy and security, as well as theirs, which lowers your credibility and makes it difficult for others to contact you to exchange more personal, sensitive information.



MISTAKE 7: I don't care about what the NSA is doing

You should because they care about what you are doing. Often people don't care because they don't live in the US, or they think they have nothing to hide.

The NSA is spying and monitoring digital communications from all around the world, not only the US. If you use an american e-mail provider then you are technically inside the US, subjected to US laws.

If you think you have nothing to hide then you better think again. We all have something to hide, especially from the ones who want to monitor us. Here is an example: if the US government decides to monitor everyone who may have an interest in bitcoins they can easily obtain from all e-mail providers the registers of all accounts that have sent or received a message cointaining the word "bitcoin" in the last 5 years. The companies will comply and provide those data to the government since they keep all the registers.

That could happen in any country with any other term. What is perfectly acceptable today, tomorrow may not be so.

Even if you really have nothing to hide in your inbox, you should still be aware that the same companies that provide you your e-mail account are collecting huge amounts of other personally identifiable information about you, which could then be given to authorities to monitor you without your authorization.



MISTAKE 8: I think my messages are safe

Keep this in mind: if something - anything - is stored it can be leaked, breached and made public, and it probably will. In fact we might say it's certain that those things will happen one day and it's not far from now, it's just a matter of time. While the companies don't change their policies and practices, there is nothing you can do to prevent it from happening, except using cryptography.



MISTAKE 9: I trust my e-mail provider

You shouldn't, especially when they have a history of controversial business practicess. First of all they use vague, open-to-interpretation Privacy Policies and Terms of Service. That by itself should be enough reason for you not to trust them. Second, if for whatever reason your data gets compromised or exposed they can't be held responsible for it, it's your loss. And finally, you have your e-mail account for free, so technically you are not even a customer.



MISTAKE 10: I believe I have privacy online

In the digital age if you want privacy you have to go for it. By default most systems you use every day such as e-mail, chat, VoIP and the web lack even basic security simply because most users are not aware of the risks and do not ask for it. Corporations take advantage of this fact and do not invest in improving their services because that would result in increased costs to them without a direct return. If you question them about it they will give canned responses such as how they take their customers' privacy seriously and how they comply with thousands of regulations (which are flawed and don't work at all).

Unfortunately it will take some time until companies start offering more secure systems by default, but that is not an excuse to remain insecure since  there are already many tools available to protect your privacy in all those services. As this post deals primarily with e-mail, we recommend that you use GNU Privacy Guard to protect your e-mails.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

There is much more to cover than what is presented in this list, but hopefully by now you are more aware of some of the privacy and security risks of using e-mail.

If you have any comments or suggestions, feel free to give your feedback by replying to this thread. Thank you!

The Golden Keys Team
1513450463
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1513450463

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1513450463
Reply with quote  #2

1513450463
Report to moderator
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1513450463
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1513450463

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1513450463
Reply with quote  #2

1513450463
Report to moderator
keithers
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1358


This is the land of wolves now & you're not a wolf


View Profile
February 21, 2014, 03:58:46 PM
 #2

Here is a list of some of the most common mistakes and misconceptions people have about e-mail usage. The purpose of this list is to help users become more aware of the security and privacy risks involved in using e-mail, especially from the big e-mail providers.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

MISTAKE 1: I use a popular e-mail provider

Hotmail, Gmail and Yahoo are some of the worst e-mail providers available. They are run by the largest IT corporations in the world where e-mail is just a segment of their business rather than the main service, and because they are very popular they focus more in acquiring and maintaining a large user base rather than offering basic security and privacy features you could expect from a decent service. As an example, until not long ago none of them supported secure connection (SSL/TLS) while you were logged in, so if you were checking your e-mails from a public Wi-Fi, café or hotel anyone could easily intercept and read your messages.



MISTAKE 2: I think only the recipients can read my messages

When you send e-mails they reach the destination almost instantly, but to accomplish that they often travel through many machines, networks and even countries, and they can be easily intercepted by anyone who is in between such as network administrators, corporations and governments. It is similar to someone opening up your mail, reading it, copying it, putting it back in the envelope and forwarding it to you, except that with e-mail it leaves no traces that the message was intercepted.



MISTAKE 3: When I empty the trash bin I believe my messages were erased forever

When you empty the trash bin all you do is to erase the messages from yourself, from your own sight, but in fact they are still there stored in your e-mail provider's servers in the form of backup for an undisclosed period of time, possibly forever. That means that in the future all those messages you thought had been erased years ago can be leaked, exposed and used against you, some of which you certainly would't like to become public.



MISTAKE 4: I think it is great that my e-mail account is free

Nothing is for free and your e-mail account is no different. While you don't pay the companies directly for it with money you do it with your privacy, which worths much more to them.

They track everything they can possibly obtain about you, including to whom you communicate, how often you communicate, the contents of your messages, your physical location, and other personally identifiable information. This is not limited to e-mails only. Since those companies also operate other business such as search engines, software development, social networks and online advertising, they often extend their tracking methods to those services and combine your data obtained from all of them to build a gigantic profile of yourself.

Now imagine all things you've ever searched during the last years combined in a single database that could be exposed or given to authorities at any time. That's what they have about you. And why do they do it? For two reasons: to sell you intrusive advertising based on your usage behavior, and to comply with government surveillance programs.

When they say they collect "certain types of personal information about our users" to "improve our service", that's exactly what they mean.



MISTAKE 5: I own my own messages, they are mine

In the US e-mails lose their status of protected communication after 6 months, which means that after this period the US government doesn't need a court order to break its secrecy, a single request (a subpoena) is enough for them obtain it. Note that you don't have to be in the US for that to happen, as long as you use a provider that has servers in the US, or your messages are routed through the US, you can expect that to happen. This applies to all messages you keep in your account, as well as the messages you deleted but they keep them in the form of backups for more than 6 months (which they all do).



MISTAKE 6: I think cryptography is unecessary

What is really unecessary is to send your messages exposed like a postal card so anyone can read them. Everybody uses e-mail these days and it is impossible to avoid the risks it poses, but there are many ways to protect against those risks, one of them is by using cryptography. Cryptography allows you to encode all your messages so only the recipient can decode them.

You have easily available to you high level cryptography for free that only brings benefits to you. It takes minutes to set up and and once configured it can be set to automatic, so you don't have to worry about enabling or choosing it every time. Another benefit is that it is compatible with any e-mail provider and you can still communicate with people who don't use cryptography if you want.

If you don't use cryptography you automatically indicate to others that you don't care about your privacy and security, as well as theirs, which lowers your credibility and makes it difficult for others to contact you to exchange more personal, sensitive information.



MISTAKE 7: I don't care about what the NSA is doing

You should because they care about what you are doing. Often people don't care because they don't live in the US, or they think they have nothing to hide.

The NSA is spying and monitoring digital communications from all around the world, not only the US. If you use an american e-mail provider then you are technically inside the US, subjected to US laws.

If you think you have nothing to hide then you better think again. We all have something to hide, especially from the ones who want to monitor us. Here is an example: if the US government decides to monitor everyone who may have an interest in bitcoins they can easily obtain from all e-mail providers the registers of all accounts that have sent or received a message cointaining the word "bitcoin" in the last 5 years. The companies will comply and provide those data to the government since they keep all the registers.

That could happen in any country with any other term. What is perfectly acceptable today, tomorrow may not be so.

Even if you really have nothing to hide in your inbox, you should still be aware that the same companies that provide you your e-mail account are collecting huge amounts of other personally identifiable information about you, which could then be given to authorities to monitor you without your authorization.



MISTAKE 8: I think my messages are safe

Keep this in mind: if something - anything - is stored it can be leaked, breached and made public, and it probably will. In fact we might say it's certain that those things will happen one day and it's not far from now, it's just a matter of time. While the companies don't change their policies and practices, there is nothing you can do to prevent it from happening, except using cryptography.



MISTAKE 9: I trust my e-mail provider

You shouldn't, especially when they have a history of controversial business practicess. First of all they use vague, open-to-interpretation Privacy Policies and Terms of Service. That by itself should be enough reason for you not to trust them. Second, if for whatever reason your data gets compromised or exposed they can't be held responsible for it, it's your loss. And finally, you have your e-mail account for free, so technically you are not even a customer.



MISTAKE 10: I believe I have privacy online

In the digital age if you want privacy you have to go for it. By default most systems you use every day such as e-mail, chat, VoIP and the web lack even basic security simply because most users are not aware of the risks and do not ask for it. Corporations take advantage of this fact and do not invest in improving their services because that would result in increased costs to them without a direct return. If you question them about it they will give canned responses such as how they take their customers' privacy seriously and how they comply with thousands of regulations (which are flawed and don't work at all).

Unfortunately it will take some time until companies start offering more secure systems by default, but that is not an excuse to remain insecure since  there are already many tools available to protect your privacy in all those services. As this post deals primarily with e-mail, we recommend that you use GNU Privacy Guard to protect your e-mails.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

There is much more to cover than what is presented in this list, but hopefully by now you are more aware of some of the privacy and security risks of using e-mail.

If you have any comments or suggestions, feel free to give your feedback by replying to this thread. Thank you!

The Golden Keys Team

You raise some valid concerns, but don't provide any potential solutions/workarounds
Lethn
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1484



View Profile WWW
February 21, 2014, 04:53:51 PM
 #3

11: You believe that banks respect your privacy and your details are kept secret whenever you purchase something with a debit/credit card

Don't use them, any time you make a purchase and you enter in your personal information that really is posted across the whole internet and the information will be kept on multiple insecure servers

12: You think Bitcoins are truly anonymous

Anoncoin looks to me to be the most promising alternative to Bitcoin if you really want to keep transactions anonymous, they even allow you to connect your wallet to the darknet and are making some genuine progress updating their code.
keithers
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1358


This is the land of wolves now & you're not a wolf


View Profile
February 21, 2014, 05:01:10 PM
 #4

11: You believe that banks respect your privacy and your details are kept secret whenever you purchase something with a debit/credit card

Don't use them, any time you make a purchase and you enter in your personal information that really is posted across the whole internet and the information will be kept on multiple insecure servers

12: You think Bitcoins are truly anonymous

Anoncoin looks to me to be the most promising alternative to Bitcoin if you really want to keep transactions anonymous, they even allow you to connect your wallet to the darknet and are making some genuine progress updating their code.

In terms of exchange, Cryptsy is the only one that supports Anoncoin right?
Nik1ab
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 574


freedomainradio.com


View Profile
February 21, 2014, 06:00:08 PM
 #5

I make none of these mistakes.

No signature ad here, because their conditions have become annoying.
practicaldreamer
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 756


View Profile
February 21, 2014, 06:28:07 PM
 #6

You raise some valid concerns, but don't provide any potential solutions/workarounds

Bitmessage
Lethn
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1484



View Profile WWW
February 21, 2014, 08:29:21 PM
 #7

11: You believe that banks respect your privacy and your details are kept secret whenever you purchase something with a debit/credit card

Don't use them, any time you make a purchase and you enter in your personal information that really is posted across the whole internet and the information will be kept on multiple insecure servers

12: You think Bitcoins are truly anonymous

Anoncoin looks to me to be the most promising alternative to Bitcoin if you really want to keep transactions anonymous, they even allow you to connect your wallet to the darknet and are making some genuine progress updating their code.

In terms of exchange, Cryptsy is the only one that supports Anoncoin right?

Vircurex trades them too Smiley


Don't forget about http://twister.net.co/ - This is in very early alpha though
dissident
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 238


View Profile
February 22, 2014, 03:21:26 PM
 #8

I really don't care if the NSA is spying on me. I should, but I don't do anything illegal. I just don't have that 'rebel' sort of personality. I should care.... I used to care... but I don't. They would just get bored. I'm willing to trade some freedom for extra security and truly believe the NSA is really just trying to keep arab terrorists and other undesirables at bay... why there are even arab terrorists threatening us and our foreign policy decisions is a subject of another discussion entirely.  They are not going to care about blue collar joe schmo going smoking pot or speeding or something like that. They don't have time for that. Only local law enforcement cares about that...and you have to get caught doing that even. Does the NSA care that people have bitcoins? Perhaps, since bitcoin does attract people who participate in illegal activities. Just your average altcoin trader not reporting his capital gains?  I suppose if you get good enough at it...

Why should I not use gmail? I'm more concerned with joe bitcoin hacker bypassing my 2 factor authentication than I am the NSA caring about what I'm doing. I look at google as a company positively.. they benefit society and for the most part offer innovation and higher levels of open source than for example Apple, spending money on projects that benefit people.  I'd be more concerned about a phone rep giving away my password without the proper credentials or even with the proper credentials.. I doubt the NSA is looking to steal people's identities and run away with their money.. that's something criminals do... for the most part, I look at the system, look at what these agencies do, and I'm satisfied enough that I can trust my accounts to my gmail... with my 32 random character password and 2 factor authentication, shredder at home to try to not keep personal information laying around in case someone decides to rob the place, and online bill statements whenever possible to eliminate personal information via the snail mail... these are the precautions I take.

If you need more security, more power to you. Make sure you use it! Wink  

TLDR: In the end, I'd be more worried about random joe criminal stealing your identity than the NSA, since you can do quite a bit with a social security number and naive phone reps, but for all I know, some of you reading this are the ones doing the identity stealing...

▀     DeepOnion  |  TOR Integrated & Secured  [ Facebook  Telegram  Bitcointalk  Twitter  Youtube  Reddit ]     ▀
Your Anonymity Guaranteed  ★  Your Assets Secured by TOR  ★  Guard Your Privacy!   ❱❱❱ JOIN AIRDROP NOW!
▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬  File Authenticity Guaranteed by DeepVault  ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
googie4
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 281



View Profile
February 23, 2014, 07:00:05 AM
 #9

I made none of those mistakes.


▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░░▓▓▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░▓▓▓▓░▓▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░▓▓▓▓▓░▒▓░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒▒▓▒░▒▓▓▓▓▓░▒▓░▒░░▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░▓▒░▒▒▓▓▓▓▓▒▒▓░▒▓░░▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░▒▓▒▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░▓▓▓▒▒▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░░▓░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░░▓░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░░▓▒░░▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒▓▒▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░▓▓░░▓░▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░▒░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░░▓▓▓░▒▓░░▓▓░▓▓░▓▓▓▓▓░░░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░░▓▓▓░▓▓░░▓▓▒░▒▓░░░░▓░░░▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░░▓▓▓▓▓▓░░▓▓░░░▒▓▒░░▓▓░░▒▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓░░░░▓▓▓▓▓░░▓▓▒░▓▒░▓▓░░▓▓▒░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓░░▓░░░▓▓▓▓░▓▓▒▓▓▓▓▒▓▓▓░▒▓▓░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▒▒▓▓▒░▓▒░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒▓▓▓▓▓▓░░▓▓░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░░░░▓▓▓░░▓▓▓▓▓▓░▓▓▓░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░░▓▓▓▓▒░▒▓▓░▒▓░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▒░▓▓▒▓▓▓▓▒▓▓▒░▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓




H.O.W.L Awoo~
No ICO  ◊  Mobile  ◊  Howl Market
Kaligulax
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 182


View Profile
February 23, 2014, 10:02:51 AM
 #10

no state secrets. I do not intend to kill the president. They can read all my e-mails.... i dont care... Smiley

1FxCUCAij9FT9fXQSqYHHMiaELhRTAhui6
sqabeloth
Jr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 42


View Profile
February 26, 2014, 09:54:54 AM
 #11

Before I join this forum I was sure that Bitcoin is Anonymus and Decentralized but now  I know I was wrong to think so

Donations: 2bf24eff-1dae-48bd-83fa-84b402ce17f5
superresistant
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1680



View Profile
February 26, 2014, 10:06:27 AM
 #12

I really don't care if the NSA is spying on me. I should, but I don't do anything illegal. I just don't have that 'rebel' sort of personality. I should care.... I used to care... but I don't. They would just get bored. I'm willing to trade some freedom for extra security and truly believe the NSA is really just trying to keep arab terrorists and other undesirables at bay... why there are even arab terrorists threatening us and our foreign policy decisions is a subject of another discussion entirely.  They are not going to care about blue collar joe schmo going smoking pot or speeding or something like that. They don't have time for that. Only local law enforcement cares about that...and you have to get caught doing that even. Does the NSA care that people have bitcoins? Perhaps, since bitcoin does attract people who participate in illegal activities. Just your average altcoin trader not reporting his capital gains?  I suppose if you get good enough at it...

Why should I not use gmail? I'm more concerned with joe bitcoin hacker bypassing my 2 factor authentication than I am the NSA caring about what I'm doing. I look at google as a company positively.. they benefit society and for the most part offer innovation and higher levels of open source than for example Apple, spending money on projects that benefit people.  I'd be more concerned about a phone rep giving away my password without the proper credentials or even with the proper credentials.. I doubt the NSA is looking to steal people's identities and run away with their money.. that's something criminals do... for the most part, I look at the system, look at what these agencies do, and I'm satisfied enough that I can trust my accounts to my gmail... with my 32 random character password and 2 factor authentication, shredder at home to try to not keep personal information laying around in case someone decides to rob the place, and online bill statements whenever possible to eliminate personal information via the snail mail... these are the precautions I take.

If you need more security, more power to you. Make sure you use it! Wink  

TLDR: In the end, I'd be more worried about random joe criminal stealing your identity than the NSA, since you can do quite a bit with a social security number and naive phone reps, but for all I know, some of you reading this are the ones doing the identity stealing...


LOL I cannot believe brainwashing is working that great. You must be a troll.

Here's my bag so you don't ask : Bitcoin, tenX, iexec, byteball and pepecash
Kaligulax
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 182


View Profile
February 26, 2014, 02:15:51 PM
 #13

Before I join this forum I was sure that Bitcoin is Anonymus and Decentralized but now  I know I was wrong to think so

well.. now you are quite right... nothing in our world is Anonymus and Decentralized... we are completely under control...

1FxCUCAij9FT9fXQSqYHHMiaELhRTAhui6
Nik1ab
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 574


freedomainradio.com


View Profile
February 26, 2014, 03:02:29 PM
 #14

no state secrets. I do not intend to kill the president. They can read all my e-mails.... i dont care... Smiley
Idiot.

Before I join this forum I was sure that Bitcoin is Anonymus and Decentralized but now  I know I was wrong to think so

well.. now you are quite right... nothing in our world is Anonymus and Decentralized... we are completely under control...
No we aren't. If the encryption is strong enough, the NSA can't read anything.

No signature ad here, because their conditions have become annoying.
skilo
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 321



View Profile
February 26, 2014, 04:45:29 PM
 #15

Technically if both parties used GPG to encrypt the message they can use whatever mail provider they want, If GPG is any good it will be unbreakable by google or NSA or anyone else.

So if you are using GPG it doesnt matter what email service you use.

This thread is silly.
keithers
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1358


This is the land of wolves now & you're not a wolf


View Profile
February 26, 2014, 07:02:22 PM
 #16

Technically if both parties used GPG to encrypt the message they can use whatever mail provider they want, If GPG is any good it will be unbreakable by google or NSA or anyone else.

So if you are using GPG it doesnt matter what email service you use.

This thread is silly.

Excuse my ignorance, but what is GPG and how would I go about learning about it?
skilo
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 321



View Profile
February 26, 2014, 07:06:03 PM
 #17

Technically if both parties used GPG to encrypt the message they can use whatever mail provider they want, If GPG is any good it will be unbreakable by google or NSA or anyone else.

So if you are using GPG it doesnt matter what email service you use.

This thread is silly.

Excuse my ignorance, but what is GPG and how would I go about learning about it?

Ever hear of a site called google?
brownbear
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 91


View Profile
February 26, 2014, 07:07:24 PM
 #18

Excuse my ignorance, but what is GPG and how would I go about learning about it?
Get this book, it's great: https://goldencontest.wordpress.com
keithers
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1358


This is the land of wolves now & you're not a wolf


View Profile
February 26, 2014, 09:58:13 PM
 #19

Technically if both parties used GPG to encrypt the message they can use whatever mail provider they want, If GPG is any good it will be unbreakable by google or NSA or anyone else.

So if you are using GPG it doesnt matter what email service you use.

This thread is silly.

Excuse my ignorance, but what is GPG and how would I go about learning about it?

Ever hear of a site called google?

no, what is the website? lol
techgeak300
Jr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 49


View Profile
February 27, 2014, 12:04:41 AM
 #20

11: You believe that banks respect your privacy and your details are kept secret whenever you purchase something with a debit/credit card

Don't use them, any time you make a purchase and you enter in your personal information that really is posted across the whole internet and the information will be kept on multiple insecure servers

12: You think Bitcoins are truly anonymous

Anoncoin looks to me to be the most promising alternative to Bitcoin if you really want to keep transactions anonymous, they even allow you to connect your wallet to the darknet and are making some genuine progress updating their code.
Look into sx transactions.
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=418071.0
Pages: [1] 2 »  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!