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Author Topic: Criteria for choosing a good bounty  (Read 68 times)
freighttrain
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July 31, 2018, 02:45:38 AM
 #1

Your criteria for choosing a good bounty should be practically the same as that criteria you would have if you were considering making a financial investment in the project. Remember, even if you're not investing money, when you participate in a bounty you're still investing. You're simply investing time rather than money. And you expect compensation for it. Why would you participate in a bounty for a project you're not interested in investing in? It makes no sense. Overview of what you should look for:

1. Does their project solve an actual need? Do they actually have a business here which they can monetize?
2. Look for some kind of MVP at the very least. Are they actually building something technically interesting? What do they have so far
3. Team. Can they pull it off?
4. Cryptoeconomics. Do they actually need a token as part of their business model. Hint: most don't. Projects like Augur for example do.
5. Who have they partnered with? Being partnered with big names e.g. BitcoinSuisse/AmaZix is a lot better as they projects do much more in depth due diligence and help hold the projects to account. If the project is managing their own bounty, instead of it being professionally managed, what reason do they have to actually pay you?
6. Look for projects that are straight forward & blunt with people. Not projects that vomit out useless marketing pieces about how they're going to "revolutionize the world". Also avoid projects that are too focused on getting your money / giving investors discounts/bonuses
7. Ask yourself if you think the project will be successful and highly sought after. Will they hit their hardcap? If they only reach 1/4 of their hard cap, chances are their token price won't hold up too well.
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audaciousbeing
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July 31, 2018, 05:15:00 AM
 #2

Your criteria for choosing a good bounty should be practically the same as that criteria you would have if you were considering making a financial investment in the project. Remember, even if you're not investing money, when you participate in a bounty you're still investing. You're simply investing time rather than money. And you expect compensation for it. Why would you participate in a bounty for a project you're not interested in investing in? It makes no sense. Overview of what you should look for:

1. Does their project solve an actual need? Do they actually have a business here which they can monetize?
2. Look for some kind of MVP at the very least. Are they actually building something technically interesting? What do they have so far
3. Team. Can they pull it off?
4. Cryptoeconomics. Do they actually need a token as part of their business model. Hint: most don't. Projects like Augur for example do.
5. Who have they partnered with? Being partnered with big names e.g. BitcoinSuisse/AmaZix is a lot better as they projects do much more in depth due diligence and help hold the projects to account. If the project is managing their own bounty, instead of it being professionally managed, what reason do they have to actually pay you?
6. Look for projects that are straight forward & blunt with people. Not projects that vomit out useless marketing pieces about how they're going to "revolutionize the world". Also avoid projects that are too focused on getting your money / giving investors discounts/bonuses
7. Ask yourself if you think the project will be successful and highly sought after. Will they hit their hardcap? If they only reach 1/4 of their hard cap, chances are their token price won't hold up too well.

All of those criterion you listed there are very much valid which any serious bounty hunter should try as much as possible to get clarifications on but at the same time, those criterion are more for an investor than a bounty hunter because most of the things you listed there don't always happen for majority of the projects at the beginning of laughing the campaign rather its during the development phase that you get to see Tue partnerships materializing and some until after the entire pre-sale and ICO sale which means a bounty itself would have been long gone  or completed already before you have the answers.

One potent way that has low rate of failure is the quality of the bounty manager. There are certain people when in charge of a campaign one thing is sure, you will get paid and for the mere that they can attach their name to that project means its going to perform at the least an average success rate.

cuong1610
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August 01, 2018, 12:18:10 PM
 #3

Your criteria for choosing a good bounty should be practically the same as that criteria you would have if you were considering making a financial investment in the project. Remember, even if you're not investing money, when you participate in a bounty you're still investing. You're simply investing time rather than money. And you expect compensation for it. Why would you participate in a bounty for a project you're not interested in investing in? It makes no sense. Overview of what you should look for:

1. Does their project solve an actual need? Do they actually have a business here which they can monetize?
2. Look for some kind of MVP at the very least. Are they actually building something technically interesting? What do they have so far
3. Team. Can they pull it off?
4. Cryptoeconomics. Do they actually need a token as part of their business model. Hint: most don't. Projects like Augur for example do.
5. Who have they partnered with? Being partnered with big names e.g. BitcoinSuisse/AmaZix is a lot better as they projects do much more in depth due diligence and help hold the projects to account. If the project is managing their own bounty, instead of it being professionally managed, what reason do they have to actually pay you?
6. Look for projects that are straight forward & blunt with people. Not projects that vomit out useless marketing pieces about how they're going to "revolutionize the world". Also avoid projects that are too focused on getting your money / giving investors discounts/bonuses
7. Ask yourself if you think the project will be successful and highly sought after. Will they hit their hardcap? If they only reach 1/4 of their hard cap, chances are their token price won't hold up too well.
Now there are a lot of bounty With me, I will enter the bounty that is already exists.
               + If that bounty has many people interested
               + What is that bounty doing?  Is it useful?
               + Can evaluate their team ?
               + Will they return them much?
And sometimes it may be because I find it interesting. That's my own opinion, maybe it's sketchy but that's what I do when choosing a bonus
SuiMikira
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August 01, 2018, 12:38:10 PM
 #4

First thing i consider is team of the project, a good project must have strong team with good background, clearly information. It's the most important thing because many scam ICO use fake team information. Second thing is its partners, a good ICO need good partner to help them success. The partnership must be public by 2 sides to confirm it. Third is the Bounty campaign manage by trust Bounty agencies.

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chulos
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August 01, 2018, 05:37:03 PM
 #5

Thank you for the technical analysis for choosing a good bounty. It is up to everyone to invest with rationality or not. Your points will be helpful for many beginners. I also look at the following points for choosing - the skilled people stand behind her, a well-known and successful past, something different from the flood of other coins, it often writes about it (if nobody knows about it, it probably will not be used) and it has a real use in the world.
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August 01, 2018, 09:13:36 PM
 #6

First the project must be possible to do and it must be people need.Then there must be a strong and visible team.And the bounty manager must be trusted and a good manager.
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