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Author Topic: Hard Fork  (Read 89 times)
nedian
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August 16, 2018, 06:51:07 AM
 #1

What is Hard Fork in any Blockchain?
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August 16, 2018, 07:25:10 AM
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Your question has been answered so many times here on the forum. For example, start here:

https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=4227118.0

Also, Andreas has a nice explanation of this topic in his book Mastering Bitcoin:

Quote
In Blockchain Forks we looked at how the bitcoin network may briefly diverge, with two parts of the network following two different branches of the blockchain for a short time. We saw how this process occurs naturally, as part of the normal operation of the network and how the network reconverges on a common blockchain after one or more blocks are mined.

There is another scenario in which the network may diverge into following two chains: a change in the consensus rules. This type of fork is called a hard fork, because after the fork the network does not reconverge onto a single chain. Instead, the two chains evolve independently. Hard forks occur when part of the network is operating under a different set of consensus rules than the rest of the network. This may occur because of a bug or because of a deliberate change in the implementation of the consensus rules.

Hard forks can be used to change the rules of consensus, but they require coordination between all participants in the system. Any nodes that do not upgrade to the new consensus rules are unable to participate in the consensus mechanism and are forced onto a separate chain at the moment of the hard fork. Thus, a change introduced by a hard fork can be thought of as not "forward compatible," in that nonupgraded systems can no longer process the new consensus rules.
Source: https://github.com/bitcoinbook/bitcoinbook/blob/develop/ch10.asciidoc The emphasis is mine
Paigewatkins
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August 16, 2018, 08:55:21 AM
 #3

Hardfork is the old code copy of the software and is repaired to create a new one, the new one that changes dramatically and all that does not accept the old one is called Hardfork. In the past, ETH has been hard fork to succeed and produce another distinct currency that is ETC.
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August 16, 2018, 09:25:04 AM
 #4

HardFork is a split that creates a software update that is more different than the old version. Bitcoin HardFork is scheduled to create two competing Bitcoin versions, at which time the Bitcoin price is pushed. Up to 24% of the major reason for people to buy is due to a specific HardFork incident on HardFork. Those who own Bitcoin receive a corresponding amount of bitcoin on the chain of decomposition in accordance with the amount of Bitcoin chain origin.
Allison1998
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August 16, 2018, 11:51:13 AM
 #5

Hard Fork is a permanent dump on Blockchain, which occurs when nodes that are not upgraded cannot validate the blocks generated by the updated nodes that are following the authentication rules for the new Block.
This is due to a change in the Blockchain protocol, which in turn blocks/transactions from being authenticated. This forces all nodes of the user to upgrade to the latest version on the protocol.
This is inevitable to create a fork on Blockchain, one that will follow the new path, upgrade Blockchain, and the other one will continue the old path. In general, after a short period of time, people choosing the old route will realize that their Blockchain version is outdated or unrelated, and will also upgrade to the latest version.
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August 16, 2018, 12:17:11 PM
 #6

https://cryptocurrencyfacts.com/understanding-hard-forks-cryptocurrency/

If you want the simplest term read on how that article described it.

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August 16, 2018, 03:39:31 PM
 #7

Creating another coin and managed by the same team



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August 17, 2018, 12:06:55 AM
 #8

Creating another coin and managed by the same team
Huh Nope
Let's say the hard fork is improvement of the particular coin features , implementing hard fork on the particular coin will result chain split so as result it will create a another coin.


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August 17, 2018, 08:53:29 PM
 #9

Also, Andreas has a nice explanation of this topic in his book Mastering Bitcoin:

Quote
In Blockchain Forks we looked at how the bitcoin network may briefly diverge, with two parts of the network following two different branches of the blockchain for a short time. We saw how this process occurs naturally, as part of the normal operation of the network and how the network reconverges on a common blockchain after one or more blocks are mined.

There is another scenario in which the network may diverge into following two chains: a change in the consensus rules. This type of fork is called a hard fork, because after the fork the network does not reconverge onto a single chain. Instead, the two chains evolve independently. Hard forks occur when part of the network is operating under a different set of consensus rules than the rest of the network. This may occur because of a bug or because of a deliberate change in the implementation of the consensus rules.

Hard forks can be used to change the rules of consensus, but they require coordination between all participants in the system. Any nodes that do not upgrade to the new consensus rules are unable to participate in the consensus mechanism and are forced onto a separate chain at the moment of the hard fork. Thus, a change introduced by a hard fork can be thought of as not "forward compatible," in that nonupgraded systems can no longer process the new consensus rules.

I like his explanation. Hard forks are most easily understood as incompatible consensus changes.

Unfortunately, we use a slightly different definition in Bitcoin development. Generally, “hard forks” refer to consensus forks where rules are removed. “Soft forks” refer to consensus forks where rules are added — these are compatible with previous versions as long as they are enforced by a majority of hash power. But “User-activated soft forks (UASFs)” are a priori incompatible with previous versions, because they activate without regard for hash power.

...which brings me back to my original thought. Andreas’ definition is much easier. Cheesy

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