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Author Topic: Overclocking warranty  (Read 1312 times)
Meni Rosenfeld
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March 25, 2011, 08:07:37 AM
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When I send a graphics card to a shop for replacement under warranty (I gather that it's common in some places to RMA it directly with the manufacturer, but not here), can they tell if I overclocked it? Will they cause problems if they determine that I did? What about underclocking?

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March 25, 2011, 08:33:59 AM
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Unless you flashed an OCed BIOS on the card and didn't wipe it clean, no they cannot know... Even if there are obvious overrheating issues, it cannot be proven it was done by OCing, it could be that you have a sucky case and the program that controlledthe fan was fucked up or some other BS

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March 31, 2011, 05:43:36 PM
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BUT regardless, this is theft. If you damage it (which overclocking is), you should eat the cost.

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March 31, 2011, 06:27:37 PM
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Theft.....not so much.  It would be a violation of the terms of the warranty for most manufacturers.  There are some exceptions, though.
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March 31, 2011, 08:18:36 PM
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Don't know about nVidia but for ATi, the o/cing issue is anything but clear cut. I mean, CCC allows you to o/c your cards (within certain limits, but how can one know if the limit was breached?), and i doubt manufacturers would come up with warranty conditions that contradict ATi's official support.

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March 31, 2011, 08:46:50 PM
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Theft.....not so much.  It would be a violation of the terms of the warranty for most manufacturers.  There are some exceptions, though.

Shall we say defraud then?

If one seeks replacement of hardware knowing that it has been damaged due to something that falls outside of the warranty, they are defrauding the company.
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April 01, 2011, 02:44:34 AM
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Don't know about nVidia but for ATi, the o/cing issue is anything but clear cut. I mean, CCC allows you to o/c your cards (within certain limits, but how can one know if the limit was breached?), and i doubt manufacturers would come up with warranty conditions that contradict ATi's official support.

I know on the nVidia side of things, you have to accept a EULA before overclocking with the software that they provide.  But, ... you're right, it's not clear exactly which cards you can overclock and not void the warranty until you read very carefully.  AMD doesn't need to be the arbiter of what cards can be returned to their manufacturers.  If Company A wants to warranty their card with overclocks and Company B does not, then they can each do their own thing.  People that bought Company A's cards are free to overclock and if their card melts, they can send it back to Company A.  If someone with Company B's card overclocked it and it failed, they can send it back and hope they'll replace it, but that is fraud.
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