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Author Topic: Massive hack hit 760 companies  (Read 1105 times)
Brian DeLoach
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October 28, 2011, 03:58:19 AM
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We're getting some more information about the RSA hack into Northrop Grumman.

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A massive cyberattack that led to a vulnerability in RSA's SecurID tags earlier this year also victimized Google, Facebook, Microsoft and many other big-named companies, according to a new analysis released this week.

http://money.cnn.com/2011/10/27/technology/rsa_hack_widespread/index.htm?hpt=hp_t2
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fivebells
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October 28, 2011, 08:14:57 AM
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Very uninformative article.
Brian DeLoach
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October 28, 2011, 08:47:36 AM
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From Brian Kreb's blog:

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A few caveats are in order here. First, many of the network owners listed are Internet service providers, and are likely included because some of their subscribers were hit. Second, it is not clear how many systems in each of these companies or networks were compromised, for how long those intrusions persisted, or whether the attackers successfully stole sensitive information from all of the victims. Finally, some of these organizations (there are several antivirus firms mentioned  below) may be represented because they  intentionally compromised internal systems in an effort to reverse engineer malware used in these attacks.

That explains the lack of detail.
cruikshank
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October 28, 2011, 09:08:36 AM
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Gotta love it when reporters without any IT background talk about these things:

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Hacks are almost a form of currency in the cybercrime economy. Hackers launch cyberattacks on as many victims as they can in order to sell their access to interested third parties.

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Phinnaeus Gage
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October 28, 2011, 01:59:56 PM
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Gotta love it when reporters without any IT background talk about these things:

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Hacks are almost a form of currency in the cybercrime economy. Hackers launch cyberattacks on as many victims as they can in order to sell their access to interested third parties.

No biggie! As long as Google doesn't index incorrect information, there's no harm none. http://www.google.com/search?gcx=w&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=%22Hackers+launch+cyberattacks+on+as%22
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October 29, 2011, 11:15:02 PM
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I meant that the reporter was being silly calling hacks a sort of currency, when they are actually product. Which would be an ok mistake, if the article didn't have that second sentence.

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October 29, 2011, 11:20:00 PM
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Gotta love it when reporters without any IT background talk about these things:

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Hacks are almost a form of currency in the cybercrime economy. Hackers launch cyberattacks on as many victims as they can in order to sell their access to interested third parties.

I guess hackers now gotta get a banking license before doing any hacking.

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