Bitcoin Forum
December 07, 2016, 08:39:26 PM *
News: Latest stable version of Bitcoin Core: 0.13.1  [Torrent].
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Scientific Voltage Supply  (Read 694 times)
Electricbees
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 322


We are bees, and we hate you.


View Profile
November 09, 2011, 05:23:36 AM
 #1

Okay, here's a theoretical question.
Put the case that you have a large amount of expensive scientific power supplies at your disposal. (The sort with the Volt and Amp regulating knobs)
Could one, theoretically, hook something like this up to feed graphics cards?
I know the cards will need to pull varying amounts of current @12volts, but with ANY amount of work, could this be done?

Just a thought, wondering the inherent difference between comp and scientific power supplies.

Donations are welcome!
1BEES19ds5gEnRBoU1qNFPfjRXe94trMG3
1481143166
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481143166

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481143166
Reply with quote  #2

1481143166
Report to moderator
1481143166
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481143166

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481143166
Reply with quote  #2

1481143166
Report to moderator
"There should not be any signed int. If you've found a signed int somewhere, please tell me (within the next 25 years please) and I'll change it to unsigned int." -- Satoshi
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
DeathAndTaxes
Donator
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1218


Gerald Davis


View Profile
November 09, 2011, 06:42:32 AM
 #2

Not sure how you can have an amp regulating knob.  Power supply sets the voltage.  The device's load determines the amperage. 

Essentially any power supply which can deliver sufficient amount of current @ 12 VDC "can" be used.  Doesn't mean it is a good idea to use it or that it would be efficient but it can be used.  If you have a power supply which has adjustable voltage you need to set it to 12 VDC.  Make sure you get polarity right.  You want current flowing FROM the 12V PCIe connector TO the ground PCIe connector.
Electricbees
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 322


We are bees, and we hate you.


View Profile
November 09, 2011, 07:09:15 AM
 #3

Not sure how you can have an amp regulating knob.  Power supply sets the voltage.  The device's load determines the amperage. 


I'm surely remembering what I've seen incorrectly then. The supplies definitely have two knobs, and we use them for electromagnetic experiments here at the university...  Huh
I would never trust myself to use such a setup with my precious videocards, but I had seen a mod where people used PSUs as scientific supplies. Seems that you should be able to do the reverse, right? Not worth the time and effort in any case...


Donations are welcome!
1BEES19ds5gEnRBoU1qNFPfjRXe94trMG3
cicada
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 196


View Profile
November 09, 2011, 04:22:53 PM
 #4

Turning a computer PSU into a scientific power supply gives you a cheap, well regulated supply with the disadvantage that voltages aren't adjustable.  They're perfect for working with microcontrollers and such as you get nice, stable 3.3V, 5V, and 12V rails with usually a +/- 10% variance at most.

A real scientific bench power supply is much more expensive, has the advantage of adjustable voltage, but generally are rated for relatively low amperage.  The voltages are spot on, with +/- 1% variance on a good supply.  That sensitivity is attained by basically ignoring efficiency - they do whatever it takes to get you a stable current.

So, unless you have a bunch sitting around like you do, and don't need to care about efficiency, it's generally not worthwhile to go in the other direction Wink

Team Epic!

All your bitcoin are belong to 19mScWkZxACv215AN1wosNNQ54pCQi3iB7
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!