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Author Topic: Bitcoin-accepting organizations' acceptance/usage of GoDaddy which supports SOPA  (Read 7107 times)
mizerydearia
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December 23, 2011, 05:35:42 PM
 #21

The list in my original post is complete as of now.
Each block is stacked on top of the previous one. Adding another block to the top makes all lower blocks more difficult to remove: there is more "weight" above each block. A transaction in a block 6 blocks deep (6 confirmations) will be very difficult to remove.
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December 23, 2011, 05:37:31 PM
 #22

anyone else care to elaborate what could be done to downsize piracy on the net?   or how SOPA could be used to censor the internet? excluding wikileaks example, as it's obvious and probably single instance where sopa could be utilized in such a way.

I don't honestly think that it will be possible to protect IP in the future.  I'm just stating this as a fact and not trying to present an opinion in favor or against the concept of IP.  Organizations will have to develop business models that don't rely on IP protection.

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December 23, 2011, 05:46:58 PM
 #23

anyone else care to elaborate what could be done to downsize piracy on the net?   or how SOPA could be used to censor the internet? excluding wikileaks example, as it's obvious and probably single instance where sopa could be utilized in such a way.

I don't honestly think that it will be possible to protect IP in the future.  I'm just stating this as a fact and not trying to present an opinion in favor or against the concept of IP.  Organizations will have to develop business models that don't rely on IP protection.

there is nothing wrong with open source as there is nothing wrong with closed source models. if someone want's to share their work it is their choice right as it is their right if they want to sell or license their work. presently, piracy unpunishably undermines abilities of those who wish to offer their works on limited terms. that is the issue.   it is not a philosophical question what is ultimately and in most humane sense ideal. anyone should have a choice and ability to do with their work as they wish and if their rights to do so are discriminated or severed, there should be serious legal or criminal implications to those who undermine these rights of others.
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December 23, 2011, 06:01:34 PM
 #24

My thread wins by about 4 hours. You didn't see it because I decided to be "good" and put it in the  "Politics & Society" sub-forum.

As I point out in that post, Godaddy goes by many names, including "Domains By Proxy" "Wild West Domains". The most highly rated comment of this reddit thread explains how to avoid such pitfalls. In general, watch for the star trademark* in the logo and avoiding any registrar making use of "SECURESERVER.NET."

As any government censorship, sopa will only hurt honest ppl. Pirates are already doing illegal things, one more won't stop them. Pirates will probably keep doing what they are already doing

Not true!

Due to the SOPA, the Pirate Party of Canada has moved from GoDaddy to NameCheap for their domain hosting.

Quote from: Serge
if someone want's to share their work it is their choice right as it is their right if they want to sell or license their work. presently, piracy unpunishably undermines abilities of those who wish to offer their works on limited terms. that is the issue.

Did You Say “Intellectual Property”? It's a Seductive Mirage(Essay by Richard M. Stallman)

The problem is that the "Intellectual Property" narrative is fiction. You can't transfer ideas, only share them. You can't destroy ideas, only suppress them. One thig I found disappointing about that essay is that RMS did not make it clear that "Intellectual Property" does have a technical legal meaning, related to the GATT treaty forming WIPO. Recent treaties such as ACTA repeat the same language.

The biggest problem with "Intellectual Property" is that it tramples property rights. I can no longer easily buy a "general Purpose" computer: they are being increasingly locked down so as to resemble consoles or cell-phones. Speaking of consoles, Sony remote revoked "Other OS" functionality on the FAT PS3's at the mere hint that somebody may be able to break out of the hypervisor. That is, millions of comsumers have had their property tampered with in the name of protecting "Intellectual Property" like copyrighted games.


*I have not verified that it is a registered trademark.

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December 23, 2011, 06:04:00 PM
 #25

anyone else care to elaborate what could be done to downsize piracy on the net?   or how SOPA could be used to censor the internet? excluding wikileaks example, as it's obvious and probably single instance where sopa could be utilized in such a way.

I don't honestly think that it will be possible to protect IP in the future.  I'm just stating this as a fact and not trying to present an opinion in favor or against the concept of IP.  Organizations will have to develop business models that don't rely on IP protection.

there is nothing wrong with open source as there is nothing wrong with closed source models. if someone want's to share their work it is their choice right as it is their right if they want to sell or license their work. presently, piracy unpunishably undermines abilities of those who wish to offer their works on limited terms. that is the issue.   it is not a philosophical question what is ultimately and in most humane sense ideal. anyone should have a choice and ability to do with their work as they wish and if their rights to do so are discriminated or severed, there should be serious legal or criminal implications to those who undermine these rights of others.

But is it really to the point where we need to give the government the right to censor the internet, even to the point of having ISPs just outright block certain content providers based on their say so?  I mean I'm definitely not a Libertarian, but I certainly don't want to see the government get this kind of capability. 

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December 23, 2011, 06:17:28 PM
 #26

anyone else care to elaborate what could be done to downsize piracy on the net?   or how SOPA could be used to censor the internet? excluding wikileaks example, as it's obvious and probably single instance where sopa could be utilized in such a way.

I don't honestly think that it will be possible to protect IP in the future.  I'm just stating this as a fact and not trying to present an opinion in favor or against the concept of IP.  Organizations will have to develop business models that don't rely on IP protection.

there is nothing wrong with open source as there is nothing wrong with closed source models. if someone want's to share their work it is their choice right as it is their right if they want to sell or license their work. presently, piracy unpunishably undermines abilities of those who wish to offer their works on limited terms. that is the issue.   it is not a philosophical question what is ultimately and in most humane sense ideal. anyone should have a choice and ability to do with their work as they wish and if their rights to do so are discriminated or severed, there should be serious legal or criminal implications to those who undermine these rights of others.

But is it really to the point where we need to give the government the right to censor the internet, even to the point of having ISPs just outright block certain content providers based on their say so?

I don't believe SOPA will be an effective method in censoring the internet. Every time a gov wants to censor something they would have to tie it up with piracy or counter-fitting, other than cases such as wikileaks it will be very hard for them to justify and prosecute a censorship case with SOPA. and people will take notice and react if it occurs, so I'm not really worried about SOPA censoring anything effectively. but the issue with piracy remains...
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December 23, 2011, 06:22:26 PM
 #27

anyone else care to elaborate what could be done to downsize piracy on the net?   or how SOPA could be used to censor the internet? excluding wikileaks example, as it's obvious and probably single instance where sopa could be utilized in such a way.

I don't honestly think that it will be possible to protect IP in the future.  I'm just stating this as a fact and not trying to present an opinion in favor or against the concept of IP.  Organizations will have to develop business models that don't rely on IP protection.

there is nothing wrong with open source as there is nothing wrong with closed source models. if someone want's to share their work it is their choice right as it is their right if they want to sell or license their work. presently, piracy unpunishably undermines abilities of those who wish to offer their works on limited terms. that is the issue.   it is not a philosophical question what is ultimately and in most humane sense ideal. anyone should have a choice and ability to do with their work as they wish and if their rights to do so are discriminated or severed, there should be serious legal or criminal implications to those who undermine these rights of others.

But is it really to the point where we need to give the government the right to censor the internet, even to the point of having ISPs just outright block certain content providers based on their say so?

I don't believe SOPA will be an effective method in censoring the internet. Every time a gov wants to censor something they would have to tie it up with piracy or counter-fitting, other than cases such as wikileaks it will be very hard for them to justify and prosecute a censorship case with SOPA. and people will take notice and react if it occurs, so I'm not really worried about SOPA censoring anything effectively. but the issue with piracy remains...

Well this isn't a thread about piracy, so it isn't really a relevant discussion to have.  Feel free to start another thread in the relevant forum though. 

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Serge
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December 23, 2011, 06:35:06 PM
 #28

anyone else care to elaborate what could be done to downsize piracy on the net?   or how SOPA could be used to censor the internet? excluding wikileaks example, as it's obvious and probably single instance where sopa could be utilized in such a way.

I don't honestly think that it will be possible to protect IP in the future.  I'm just stating this as a fact and not trying to present an opinion in favor or against the concept of IP.  Organizations will have to develop business models that don't rely on IP protection.

there is nothing wrong with open source as there is nothing wrong with closed source models. if someone want's to share their work it is their choice right as it is their right if they want to sell or license their work. presently, piracy unpunishably undermines abilities of those who wish to offer their works on limited terms. that is the issue.   it is not a philosophical question what is ultimately and in most humane sense ideal. anyone should have a choice and ability to do with their work as they wish and if their rights to do so are discriminated or severed, there should be serious legal or criminal implications to those who undermine these rights of others.

But is it really to the point where we need to give the government the right to censor the internet, even to the point of having ISPs just outright block certain content providers based on their say so?

I don't believe SOPA will be an effective method in censoring the internet. Every time a gov wants to censor something they would have to tie it up with piracy or counter-fitting, other than cases such as wikileaks it will be very hard for them to justify and prosecute a censorship case with SOPA. and people will take notice and react if it occurs, so I'm not really worried about SOPA censoring anything effectively. but the issue with piracy remains...

Well this isn't a thread about piracy, so it isn't really a relevant discussion to have.  Feel free to start another thread in the relevant forum though.  

this thread is about rallying opposition to SOPA as many concerned it might be used as a tool to censor the internet, but no one can explain how it would be effectively utilized in such a way ?
if SOPA goes into effect, who do you think in terms of censorship will be government's targets, who will they shutdown on premises of SOPA?
hope this is more relevant to topic than piracy concerns.
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December 23, 2011, 06:44:18 PM
 #29

I don't believe SOPA will be an effective method in censoring the internet. Every time a gov wants to censor something they would have to tie it up with piracy or counter-fitting, other than cases such as wikileaks it will be very hard for them to justify and prosecute a censorship case with SOPA. and people will take notice and react if it occurs, so I'm not really worried about SOPA censoring anything effectively. but the issue with piracy remains...

How SOPA's 'circumvention' ban could put a target on Tor

I'm sure the same reasoning could be used for bitcoin when it is used to circumvent payment processor blockades to controversial sites.

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December 23, 2011, 06:52:50 PM
 #30

I will be starting the process of moving away from goaddy in the first week of the new year if they do not so that they may reverse their position on SOPA.

Take decisive action to cause effective action else immediate penalty. When I read if I hear never. Take a stand for what you believe and let them know.



but no one can explain how it would be effectively utilized in such a way ?
if SOPA goes into effect, who do you think in terms of censorship will be government's targets, who will they shutdown on premises of SOPA?

If I lived in the United States it would concern me greatly that my government is granting itself unjust powers, whether it only affects others, or is only theoretical, or not defensible. All Americans it seems are criminals by some law or another. It's sick. You should fight it at ever step of the way and try to reverse the trend. Go take a poll. Does any citizen actually support this bill? Question your democracy.

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December 23, 2011, 06:55:47 PM
 #31

if SOPA goes into effect, who do you think in terms of censorship will be government's targets, who will they shutdown on premises of SOPA?

Anyone and anything they don't like. Tomorrow it might be all sites related to Bitcoin.

And they won't need to justify it to anyone or need any court approval... just like with America's assassinations through the use of drones.

You may agree with your government today but what about the next one which comes to power in the traditional ways governments come to power ( more often than not having little to do with anything like democracy )?  

If we could trust entities like this we wouldn't need things like Bitcoin.  

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December 23, 2011, 06:58:38 PM
 #32

Actually I'd like to go back to something you posted earlier.  


I don't believe SOPA will be an effective method in censoring the internet. Every time a gov wants to censor something they would have to tie it up with piracy or counter-fitting, other than cases such as wikileaks it will be very hard for them to justify and prosecute a censorship case with SOPA. and people will take notice and react if it occurs, so I'm not really worried about SOPA censoring anything effectively. but the issue with piracy remains...

If it does pass, it will be easy to get around it as you said.  However this brings up a whole new set of problems as outlined in this paper
http://www.circleid.com/posts/20110525_experts_urge_congress_to_reject_proposed_dns_filtering_protect_ip/

Quote
   The U.S. Government and private industry have identified Internet security and stability as a key part of a wider cyber security strategy, and if implemented, the DNS related provisions of PROTECT IP would weaken this important commitment.
  
 DNS filters would be evaded easily, and would likely prove ineffective at reducing online infringement. Further, widespread circumvention would threaten the security and stability of the global DNS.
    
The DNS provisions would undermine the universality of domain names, which has been one of the key enablers of the innovation, economic growth, and improvements in communications and information access unleashed by the global Internet.
    
Migration away from ISP-provided DNS servers would harm efforts that rely on DNS data to detect and mitigate security threats and improve network performance.
    
Dependencies within the DNS would pose significant risk of collateral damage, with filtering of one domain potentially affecting users' ability to reach non-infringing Internet content.
    
The site redirection envisioned in Section 3(d)(II)(A)(ii) is inconsistent with security extensions to the DNS that are known as DNSSEC. The U.S. Government and private industry have identified DNSSEC as a key part of a wider cyber security strategy, and many private, military, and governmental networks have invested in DNSSEC technologies.
    
If implemented, this section of the PROTECT IP Act would weaken this important effort to improve Internet security. It would enshrine and institutionalize the very network manipulation that DNSSEC must fight in order to prevent cyberattacks and other malevolent behavior on the global Internet, thereby exposing networks and users to increased security and privacy risks.

Quote
First, the DNS filters that would be required to enforce SOPA could be easily defeated, rendering them useless. Criminals could develop ways to redirect users to DNS servers outside the U.S. and SOPA’s influence, and users may even look for these foreign and/or unregulated DNS servers if the sites they are trying to locate have been blocked in their ISP’s DNS as a consequence of SOPA.

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December 23, 2011, 07:06:55 PM
 #33

BTW i don't agree with my government on many things, some might even say my views are anti-american as i mock all of its political circus, i'm all for free speech and i'm concerned about piracy as well.

whoever above said gov could shutdown anyone with SOPA, the gov will need to build the case and argue that it is piracy or counterfeit related, otherwise they would not a stand a chance shutting down sites left and right without any legal justification and evidence of crime.  do you honestly think if they censor your or anybodies else's site based on SOPA and you have nothing to do with piracy and counterfitting you won't be able to defend your case? and what kind of case will prosecution have if they can't present evidence of pirating or counterfeiting ?
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December 23, 2011, 07:07:40 PM
 #34

At first they were like ""Go Daddy has received some emails that appear to stem from the boycott prompt, but we have not seen any impact to our business. We understand there are many differing opinions on the SOPA regulations."
but then "Go Daddy will support it when and if the Internet community supports it."
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December 23, 2011, 07:31:40 PM
 #35


wow
Quote from: ChristineJones
The companies against SOPA maintain the bill would censor free speech on the Internet,   ...
from saying they are wrong to becoming one of them in how long?

She sounded so decisively for SOPA just such a short time ago.

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December 23, 2011, 07:40:17 PM
 #36

That is the power of a boycott - even just the threat with teeth.

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December 23, 2011, 10:10:39 PM
 #37

I removed GoDaddy as a certificate authority from my OS a long time ago, so I always see which sites use one of their certs. Always amuses me when I go to a site that's supposed to be super-secure and their cert is signed by GoDaddy, which is one of the most unreputable companies around.

I'm looking for a registrar with sub-10-dollar renewal fees for com/net/org/in domains, and a pretty and functional administration interface.

If anyone has any recommendations or even referral codes, feel free to post them.

I use Namecheap.

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December 23, 2011, 10:40:30 PM
 #38

I'm looking for a registrar with sub-10-dollar renewal fees for com/net/org/in domains, and a pretty and functional administration interface.

If anyone has any recommendations or even referral codes, feel free to post them.

I use register.com.  The default price is $35, but somewhere on the net (I google for it, it's easy to find) has a promotional link that drops it down to $10.  Always been happy and they are far less spammy than godaddy.

Companies claiming they got hacked and lost your coins sounds like fraud so perfect it could be called fashionable.  I never believe them.  If I ever experience the misfortune of a real intrusion, I declare I have been honest about the way I have managed the keys in Casascius Coins.  I maintain no ability to recover or reproduce the keys, not even under limitless duress or total intrusion.  Remember that trusting strangers with your coins without any recourse is, as a matter of principle, not a best practice.  Don't keep coins online. Use paper wallets instead.
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December 23, 2011, 11:30:46 PM
 #39

Summed up rather nicely in this 4:00 video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvXo4sGB7zM
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December 23, 2011, 11:37:32 PM
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I'm looking for a registrar with sub-10-dollar renewal fees for com/net/org/in domains, and a pretty and functional administration interface.

If anyone has any recommendations or even referral codes, feel free to post them.

I use Namecheap.
Thanks. So far, they seem the most promising.

I'm looking for a registrar with sub-10-dollar renewal fees for com/net/org/in domains, and a pretty and functional administration interface.

If anyone has any recommendations or even referral codes, feel free to post them.

I use register.com.  The default price is $35, but somewhere on the net (I google for it, it's easy to find) has a promotional link that drops it down to $10.  Always been happy and they are far less spammy than godaddy.
Thanks, but I can't do without support for the "in" TLD.

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