Bitcoin Forum
September 22, 2017, 01:07:37 AM *
News: Latest stable version of Bitcoin Core: 0.15.0.1  [Torrent]. (New!)
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 »  All
  Print  
Author Topic: BIP 17  (Read 8711 times)
Gavin Andresen
Legendary
*
qt
Offline Offline

Activity: 1652


Chief Scientist


View Profile WWW
January 20, 2012, 04:53:31 PM
 #1

I haven't seen discussion of BIP 17 anywhere besides IRC, so I thought I'd start one.

I'll start by saying that I'm trying hard to put aside my biases and dispassionately evaluating the proposal on its merits (I'll just say that I'm not happy with the way BIP 17 came to be, but it is what it is).

Quick executive summary of BIP 17:

A new opcode is proposed, OP_CODEHASHVERIFY, that replaces OP_NOP2.

It is used in a new "standard" scriptPubKey that looks like:

Code:
<hash> OP_CODEHASHVERIFY OP_POP

... which is redeemed using a scriptSig like (for example, a 2-of-2 CHECKMULTISIG):

Code:
OP_0 <signature> OP_CODESEPARATOR 2 <pubkey1> <pubkey2> 2 OP_CHECKMULTISIG


OP_CODEHASHVERIFY is defined to take the hash of everything in the scriptSig from the last OP_CODESEPARATOR and compare it to the top item on the stack. If the hashes match, then it is a no-op, otherwise script validation fails. (see the spec for all the details for what happens if there is no CODESEPARATOR or a CODEHASHVERIFY is put in the scriptSig)


BIP 17 is an alternative to BIP 16, which has a scriptPubKey:

Code:
OP_HASH160 <hash> OP_EQUAL

... which is redeemed with:

Code:
OP_0 <signature> OP_PUSHDATA(2 <pubkey1> <pubkey2> 2 OP_CHECKMULTISIG)


I see the appeal of BIP 17 -- the redeeming opcodes aren't "hidden" as serialized bytes, they're right there in the scriptSig. That feels less like a hack.

However, there are a couple of practical reasons I like BIP 16 better:

  • Old clients and miners count each OP_CHECKMULTISIG in a scriptSig or scriptPubKey as 20 "signature operations (sigops)."  And there is a maximum of 20,000 sigops per block.  That means a maximum of 1,000 BIP-17-style multisig inputs per block.  BIP 16 "hides" the CHECKMULTISIGs from old clients, and (for example) counts a 2-of-2 CHECKMULTISIG as 2 sigops instead of 20. Increasing the MAX_SIGOPS limit would require a 'hard' blockchain split; BIP 16 gives 5-10 times more room for transaction growth than BIP 17 before bumping into block limits.
  • With BIP 17, both transaction outputs and inputs fail the old IsStandard() check, so old clients and miners will refuse to relay or mine both transactions that send coins into a multisignature transaction and transactions that spend multisignature transactions.  BIP 16 scriptSigs look like standard scriptSigs to old clients and miners. The practical effect is as long as less than 100% of the network is upgraded it will take longer for BIP 17 transactions to get confirmed compared to BIP 16 transactions.
  • Old clients and miners will immediately accept ANY scriptSig for BIP 17 transactions as valid. That makes me nervous; if anybody messes up and sends coins into a BIP 17 transaction before 50% of hashing power supports it anybody can claim that output. An advantage of BIP 16 is the "half-validation" of transactions; old clients and miners will check the hash in the scriptPubKey.

I also have some theoretical, "just makes me feel uncomfortable" reasons for disliking BIP 17:

  • OP_CHECKSIG feels like it was originally designed to be in the scriptPubKey-- "scriptSig is for signatures." Although I can't see any way to exploit an OP_CHECKSIG that appears in the scriptSig instead of the scriptPubKey, I'm much less confident that I might have missed something.  I'm much more confident that BIP 16 will do exactly what I think it will (because it is much more constrained, and executes the CHECKSIG exactly as if it appeared directly in the scriptPubKey).
  • Changing from the scriptSig being just "push data onto the stack" to "do the bulk of verification" also makes me nervous, especially since nodes that relay transactions can add whatever they like to the beginning of the scriptSig before relaying the transaction. Again, I can't think of any way of leveraging that into an exploit, but the added complexity of code in the scriptSig and requiring OP_CODESEPARATORs in the right place makes me nervous.
  • I've never liked OP_CODESEPARATOR-- it is not like the other opcodes, the way it isn't affected at all by OP_IF and the way it 'steps out' and causes the raw bytes of the transaction to be hashed.  Nobody has been able to figure out how to use it, and the best guess is it is like your appendix:  maybe useful in the past, but not useful now.  Safer to get rid of it entirely, in my opinion.


How often do you get the chance to work on a potentially world-changing project?
1506042457
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1506042457

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1506042457
Reply with quote  #2

1506042457
Report to moderator
1506042457
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1506042457

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1506042457
Reply with quote  #2

1506042457
Report to moderator
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1506042457
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1506042457

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1506042457
Reply with quote  #2

1506042457
Report to moderator
1506042457
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1506042457

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1506042457
Reply with quote  #2

1506042457
Report to moderator
finway
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 714


View Profile
January 20, 2012, 05:06:39 PM
 #2

Gavin's signature:

Help me out:
Ask your favorite miner or mining pool operator to support P2SH for a more secure Bitcoin

Luke-Jr
Legendary
*
expert
Offline Offline

Activity: 2240



View Profile
January 20, 2012, 06:19:01 PM
 #3

I haven't seen discussion of BIP 17 anywhere besides IRC, so I thought I'd start one.
I was waiting until I finished a reference implementation to post about it, but thanks for the early review. Smiley

I'll start by saying that I'm trying hard to put aside my biases and dispassionately evaluating the proposal on its merits (I'll just say that I'm not happy with the way BIP 17 came to be, but it is what it is).
Thanks, and sorry for not being more tactful with introducing it.

Old clients and miners count each OP_CHECKMULTISIG in a scriptSig or scriptPubKey as 20 "signature operations (sigops)."  And there is a maximum of 20,000 sigops per block.  That means a maximum of 1,000 BIP-17-style multisig inputs per block.  BIP 16 "hides" the CHECKMULTISIGs from old clients, and (for example) counts a 2-of-2 CHECKMULTISIG as 2 sigops instead of 20. Increasing the MAX_SIGOPS limit would require a 'hard' blockchain split; BIP 16 gives 5-10 times more room for transaction growth than BIP 17 before bumping into block limits.
This is indeed a benefit to the evaluation-based solutions (both OP_EVAL and BIP16), but I personally feel it's not needed nearly as urgently (how many blocks have over 1000 txns of any kind so far?) and there are many other such hidden-from-old-versions improvements that could be thrown in. BIP 17 does not preclude adding such a solution (ideally without the crucial flaws in BIP 16) in the future should it become necessary, after people have had more time to figure out just what should be added and implement them (for example, I think everyone agrees it would be nice to provide pubkey extraction from signatures).

With BIP 17, both transaction outputs and inputs fail the old IsStandard() check, so old clients and miners will refuse to relay or mine both transactions that send coins into a multisignature transaction and transactions that spend multisignature transactions.  BIP 16 scriptSigs look like standard scriptSigs to old clients and miners. The practical effect is as long as less than 100% of the network is upgraded it will take longer for BIP 17 transactions to get confirmed compared to BIP 16 transactions.
Since scriptSigs must always follow scriptPubKey, does this really make a big difference? ie, if people can't send them, they can't receive them anyway.

Old clients and miners will immediately accept ANY scriptSig for BIP 17 transactions as valid. That makes me nervous; if anybody messes up and sends coins into a BIP 17 transaction before 50% of hashing power supports it anybody can claim that output. An advantage of BIP 16 is the "half-validation" of transactions; old clients and miners will check the hash in the scriptPubKey.
Old clients don't know how to receive any P2SH transactions right now, so they won't display them in any circumstance.. Old miners won't accept them because they fail IsStandard. There is a slight risk of producing a block stealing BIP 17 funds and resending them immediately, but the same attack vector also affects the other solutions and has no effect on people who follow the best practices of waiting for 6 confirmations.

OP_CHECKSIG feels like it was originally designed to be in the scriptPubKey-- "scriptSig is for signatures." Although I can't see any way to exploit an OP_CHECKSIG that appears in the scriptSig instead of the scriptPubKey, I'm much less confident that I might have missed something.  I'm much more confident that BIP 16 will do exactly what I think it will (because it is much more constrained, and executes the CHECKSIG exactly as if it appeared directly in the scriptPubKey).
It's evaluated the exact same way in all 3 scripts, and already accepted in scriptPubKey. If there is an attack vector here (which seems very unlikely), it is there both with or without BIP 17.

I've never liked OP_CODESEPARATOR-- it is not like the other opcodes, the way it isn't affected at all by OP_IF
Isn't it?

and the way it 'steps out' and causes the raw bytes of the transaction to be hashed.
This is only true when BIP 17 is in use. Why is it a problem to hash the script executed, as opposed to execute the script hashed?

cm68jd
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 22


View Profile
January 20, 2012, 06:26:28 PM
 #4

I support BIP 17 or a proposal like it. I think that a standard method should be used. Worrying about old clients is not a valid concern, IMO. Bitcoin is still evolving. If every change had to worry about old clients, then in 10 years the bitcoin protocol is going to be a mess. Creating hackish instead of elegant solutions will only make the bitcoin protocol a convoluted mess several years down the road.

On release, a big warning can be placed on it to not use the feature until > 50% of clients support. Easy as that. Bitcoin has survived years without these features. It will survive a couple more months for a solid implementation to be created / adopted.
Red Emerald
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 742



View Profile WWW
January 20, 2012, 09:16:34 PM
 #5

I'm glad to see discussion about these proposals.  It's always nice to have working code now, but considering we are building the currency of the future, lets take time and make sure we do it right.

I'm still not sure which proposal I like the best.

Is either proposal easier for a client to manage?  It looks like both require the client to keep track of the script since it is not in the blockchain.  Is this correct?  Is there a potential to "lose" the script, or can it be recovered in some way?

Luke-Jr
Legendary
*
expert
Offline Offline

Activity: 2240



View Profile
January 20, 2012, 09:19:00 PM
 #6

Is either proposal easier for a client to manage?  It looks like both require the client to keep track of the script since it is not in the blockchain.  Is this correct?  Is there a potential to "lose" the script, or can it be recovered in some way?
That's the same for all 3 BIPs; the client already needs to manage a private key. The scripting sugar is easy to reproduce if you have that.

interlagos
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 497


View Profile
January 21, 2012, 03:31:40 PM
 #7

What if we implement both approaches on two different networks: BIP16 on Bitcoin and BIP17 on Litecoin.
I consider Litecoin a healthy alternative to Bitcoin, it might be lacking some marketing as of now, but that might change in the future.
This way we will have a backup solution for Bitcoin in case the approach taken was a mistake.
Luke-Jr
Legendary
*
expert
Offline Offline

Activity: 2240



View Profile
January 21, 2012, 03:36:29 PM
 #8

Litecoin
How about we leave scams out of this? Off topic.

Gavin Andresen
Legendary
*
qt
Offline Offline

Activity: 1652


Chief Scientist


View Profile WWW
January 21, 2012, 05:12:10 PM
 #9

I haven't seen discussion of BIP 17 anywhere besides IRC, so I thought I'd start one.
I was waiting until I finished a reference implementation to post about it, but thanks for the early review. Smiley

By the way... if there is no fully-functional reference implementation yet, you really shouldn't be putting "CHV" in your coinbases yet. The string in the coinbase really aught to mean "this code is all ready to support this feature,"  because full support from a majority of hashing power is what we want to measure.

Quote
With BIP 17, both transaction outputs and inputs fail the old IsStandard() check, so old clients and miners will refuse to relay or mine both transactions that send coins into a multisignature transaction and transactions that spend multisignature transactions.
Since scriptSigs must always follow scriptPubKey, does this really make a big difference? ie, if people can't send them, they can't receive them anyway.

Imagine you're an early adopter.  You ask people to send you money into your spiffy new ultra-secure wallet.

With BIP 16, transactions TO you will take longer to get into a block because not everybody is supporting the new feature.

But transactions FROM you will look like regular transactions, so the people you are paying won't have to wait.

That is not a big difference, but it is an advantage of the BIP 16 approach.

Quote
OP_CHECKSIG feels like it was originally designed to be in the scriptPubKey-- "scriptSig is for signatures." Although I can't see any way to exploit an OP_CHECKSIG that appears in the scriptSig instead of the scriptPubKey, I'm much less confident that I might have missed something.
It's evaluated the exact same way in all 3 scripts, and already accepted in scriptPubKey. If there is an attack vector here (which seems very unlikely), it is there both with or without BIP 17.

No, they are not evaluated in the same way.  The bit of code in bitcoin transaction validation that makes me nervous is:
Code:
   txTmp.vin[nIn].scriptSig = scriptCode;
... in SignatureHash(), which is called from the CHECKSIG opcodes.  scriptCode is the scriptPubKey from the previous (funding) transaction, txTmp is the transaction being funded.

This is the "Copy the scriptPubKey into the scriptSig before computing the hash that is signed" part of what OP_CHECKSIG does.

I like BIP 16 better than OP_EVAL/BIP 17 because BIP 16 does two complete validations, once with the scriptPubKey set to HASH160 <hash> OP_EQUAL and then once again with the scriptPubKey set to (for example) <pubkey> OP_CHECKSIG.

BIP 16 essentially says "If we see a P2SH transaction, validate it, then treat it is a normal, standard transaction and validate it again."

BIP 17 will run OP_CHECKSIGs when it is executing the scriptSig part of the transaction, which is a completely different context from where they are executed for the standard transactions we have now.

Again, I can't see a way to exploit that but it makes me very nervous.

How often do you get the chance to work on a potentially world-changing project?
Steve
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 868



View Profile WWW
January 21, 2012, 05:22:26 PM
 #10

I sat down and studied these proposals this morning.  However these proposals came about should be set aside in favor of doing what's best for bitcoin.  I have no idea what transpired, so I feel my judgement isn't clouded in that respect (could be in other respects, but not that one).

Disclaimers: I've not considered any backward compatibility issues which might trump everything I have to say.  I've also not considered any implementation concerns (complexity of the code, etc).  That might also trump what I have to say.  And finally, while I think I have a good grasp of bitcoin scripting, I am by no means an expert.

I think sending coins to a script hash is good thing and perhaps the way it should have always been done, even for simple transactions.  The BIPs say that P2SH makes it possible for the recipient to define the script required to spend coins.  But here's an observation:  It has always been the case that the recipient defines the script required to spend coins.  It's just that there has, to this point, been a universal assumption that when the recipient sends you an address, that the recipient desires that a specific kind of script (a simple single signature).  It's also not true that with P2SH that the recipient doesn't need to tell the sender the form of the script that is desired.  The recipient is telling the sender the form of the script.  It's just that since the script is only executed when spending coins, the only thing necessary to communicate to the sender is a hash of the script, not the entire script.  All transactions should work this way (the sender will never have to ask whether this is a simple, single signature transaction, or a P2SH transaction…they will all be a P2SH).

I think BIP17 is a superior proposal to BIP16 and BIP12.  BIP12 (OP_EVAL) simply adds complexity to the method of executing scripts.  Validation of scripts now needs to look into the content of data push opcodes.  I can't see that it introduces any particular security holes (i.e. AFAIK there's no way to put something onto the stack that didn't originate inside the script itself …akin to a SQL injection attack).  However, I also can't see that it adds value.  BIP16 feels like it's caught somewhere between BIP12 and BIP17.  It's neither a general purpose OP_EVAL proposal and yet it still requires special handling and execution of code pushed onto the stack for no other reason than to compute its hash.  This just feels a bit hacky to me, especially in light of OP_CODESEPARATOR, which seems to be designed for this sort of thing.

I'm not sure why the use of OP_CODESEPARATOR is a concern.  It seems to me that the way BIP17 is using it is exactly what it was intended for.  It's purpose as far as I can tell is to provide a means of isolating the portions of a script that should be subject to a hash/signature from those that shouldn't (i.e. you obviously wouldn't want a signature to actually be included as part of the hash used for signing purposes).  I assume that there is an implicit OP_CODESEPARATOR that sits between the ScriptSig and ScriptPubKey (the terminology here should probably be updated to better reflect what these two things really are…but I'm not sure how I would describe them).  I supposed if I had it to do over, I would have created an opcode to push a segment of script onto the stack…it would push just the portion of code since the last OP_CODESEPARATOR.  Then you could have something like

   scriptSig: [signature] OP_CODESEPARATOR [pubkey] OP_CHECKSIG OP_PUSHCODE
   scriptPubKey: OP_HASH160 [20-byte-hash of {[pubkey] OP_CHECKSIG} ] OP_EQUAL

Now that I type this, I realize this would only require one new opcode, OP_PUSHCODE instead of OP_CHECKHASHVERIFY…maybe BIP18?  Like BIP17 (unlike BIP12 and BIP16), there are no special execution semantics, and OP_PUSHCODE seems a little more generally useful than OP_CHECKHASHVERIFY (which is generally desirable for things that are going to consume an opcode).

I don't see any issue with using OP_CHECKSIG in the ScriptSig.  And, in fact, it's in the scriptSig in both BIP16 and BIP17 (the only difference is a meaningless difference the mechanics of how it gets executed as far as I can see).  But if someone can come up with a plausible reason to be concerned, they should certainly voice it.  I don't however think it's good to make a decision based on a vague feelings (for or against).

(gasteve on IRC) Does your website accept cash? https://bitpay.com
Luke-Jr
Legendary
*
expert
Offline Offline

Activity: 2240



View Profile
January 21, 2012, 05:37:08 PM
 #11

I assume that there is an implicit OP_CODESEPARATOR that sits between the ScriptSig and ScriptPubKey (the terminology here should probably be updated to better reflect what these two things really are…but I'm not sure how I would describe them).
There used to be, but before the protocol was made immutable it was changed so the scripts are instead executed in sequence with only the main stack inherited between them.

I supposed if I had it to do over, I would have created an opcode to push a segment of script onto the stack…it would push just the portion of code since the last OP_CODESEPARATOR.  Then you could have something like

   scriptSig: [signature] OP_CODESEPARATOR [pubkey] OP_CHECKSIG OP_PUSHCODE
   scriptPubKey: OP_HASH160 [20-byte-hash of {[pubkey] OP_CHECKSIG} ] OP_EQUAL

Now that I type this, I realize this would only require one new opcode, OP_PUSHCODE instead of OP_CHECKHASHVERIFY…maybe BIP18?  Like BIP17 (unlike BIP12 and BIP16), there are no special execution semantics, and OP_PUSHCODE seems a little more generally useful than OP_CHECKHASHVERIFY (which is generally desirable for things that are going to consume an opcode).
I agree this would be better, but I'm pretty sure it's impossible to make it backward compatible.

Steve
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 868



View Profile WWW
January 21, 2012, 06:20:29 PM
 #12

On further thought, I would revise this:

   scriptSig: [signature] OP_CODESEPARATOR [pubkey] OP_CHECKSIG OP_PUSHCODE
   scriptPubKey: OP_HASH160 [20-byte-hash of {[pubkey] OP_CHECKSIG} ] OP_EQUAL

To be:

   scriptSig: [signature] OP_CODESEPARATOR [pubkey] OP_CHECKSIG
   scriptPubKey: OP_PUSHCODE OP_HASH160 [20-byte-hash of {[pubkey] OP_CHECKSIG} ] OP_EQUAL

The reason is that in the previous form if you wanted to attack it, it's only necessary to reverse the hash160 function with whatever the scriptSig leaves on the stack.  In the second form, not only would you need to reverse the hash160 function, but it would also have to be a valid script sequence (a bit more secure).

(gasteve on IRC) Does your website accept cash? https://bitpay.com
Steve
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 868



View Profile WWW
January 22, 2012, 02:44:26 AM
 #13

Regarding backward compatibility, I think Gavin makes good points about BIP-17 in the OP (especially the point about spend transactions automatically being considered valid no matter what by old nodes).

The more I study this, the more I'm starting to feel that allowing just a specific set of standard transaction types is an unnecessary constraint on the system.  Is it an irrational fear?  Why not allow all valid scripts?  What is the risk?  It seems like it's going to be a real problem going forward if every time someone comes up with some new type of transaction they want to craft that they need to get the entire network to upgrade in order to do it (especially with P2SH).  This kind of coordinated upgrade should only be necessary if you're adding or changing the behavior of the opcodes.  Soon after the P2SH transition happens, you're then going to need to convince miners to start accepting various multi-sig transaction types.  Each time you do this, you have to be very careful or risk serious chain split.  It seems to me that the need for more interesting transaction types, and the risk of chain split when adopting them, warrants serious study of lifting the "standard transactions" restrictions.

(gasteve on IRC) Does your website accept cash? https://bitpay.com
scintill
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 448


View Profile WWW
January 22, 2012, 03:36:41 AM
 #14

The more I study this, the more I'm starting to feel that allowing just a specific set of standard transaction types is an unnecessary constraint on the system.  Is it an irrational fear?  Why not allow all valid scripts?  What is the risk?

From what I understand, part of the risk is that scripts could consume unpredictably large amounts of resources (time, memory, etc.), so we try to constrain the system to put upper bounds on what is possible.  The different proposals are seeking to find the best way to add as many new features as possible (including the ones we haven't dreamed up yet), without making the scripts too "powerful."

I suppose the others can explain more, or correct me if I'm wrong. Wink

1SCiN5kqkAbxxwesKMsH9GvyWnWP5YK2W | donations
Maged
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1260


View Profile
January 22, 2012, 03:48:47 AM
 #15

This kind of coordinated upgrade should only be necessary if you're adding or changing the behavior of the opcodes.
That's exactly what this is: "adding or changing the behavior of the opcodes". A non-P2SH multisig could be released today and individual miners could start accepting it immediately. The only downside is that the newly-whitelisted transactions wouldn't be considered standard yet by most clients, so it won't be as easily relayed to the miners that would accept the transaction. Also, the transactions wouldn't be mined as quickly.

Steve
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 868



View Profile WWW
January 22, 2012, 05:41:28 AM
 #16

This kind of coordinated upgrade should only be necessary if you're adding or changing the behavior of the opcodes.
That's exactly what this is: "adding or changing the behavior of the opcodes". A non-P2SH multisig could be released today and individual miners could start accepting it immediately. The only downside is that the newly-whitelisted transactions wouldn't be considered standard yet by most clients, so it won't be as easily relayed to the miners that would accept the transaction. Also, the transactions wouldn't be mined as quickly.
I'm aware of that.  But right after P2SH is supported, you then have to whitelist new transactions to get multi-sig.  This whitelisting process requires coordination.  I just wonder whether most (if not all) valid scripts should be allowed along with the p2sh change (subject to limitations on the number and complexity of operations).  Since the script language is not turing complete, it is possible to estimate the cost of executing a script and impose such limitations.  Otherwise, every time a new type of transaction becomes desired, you have to go through this process of coordinating the upgrade of clients to support it.

(gasteve on IRC) Does your website accept cash? https://bitpay.com
interlagos
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 497


View Profile
January 23, 2012, 07:49:51 PM
 #17

I'm wondering, which of the two approaches is easier to deprecate?
Or is it cut in stone after it is deployed?
Imagine somebody comes up with a new way of doing multisig in a year and everybody agrees that it's the right way.

Also what approach makes it easier to add new features on top of?
Think of the list of features for the next couple of years and see if the discussed multisig proposals fit nicely or not.
Luke-Jr
Legendary
*
expert
Offline Offline

Activity: 2240



View Profile
January 23, 2012, 08:10:02 PM
 #18

I'm wondering, which of the two approaches is easier to deprecate?
Or is it cut in stone after it is deployed?
Imagine somebody comes up with a new way of doing multisig in a year and everybody agrees that it's the right way.
It's easy to deprecate (= stop using) just about anything. However, dropping support for it is not quite as simple - in any case, we'd need everyone to spend transactions still using it.

Also what approach makes it easier to add new features on top of?
Think of the list of features for the next couple of years and see if the discussed multisig proposals fit nicely or not.
BIP 12 is the most flexible. BIP 16 gets a one-shot at changing any aspect of the scripting system (and it's being wasted on merely recounting sigops...). BIP 17 cannot change any scripting fundamentals, but can be used for one additional check at any part of a scriptPubKey. If BIP 17 is deployed, something like a combination of BIP 12 and 16 could be still easily used in the future as an upgrade.

Steve
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 868



View Profile WWW
January 23, 2012, 08:33:50 PM
 #19

Can someone remind me why BIP-12 has fallen out of favor?  OP_EVAL might add some amount of flexibility (regarding where a script is defined vs when it is actually executed), but none of these proposals seems radically different form one another.

(gasteve on IRC) Does your website accept cash? https://bitpay.com
Luke-Jr
Legendary
*
expert
Offline Offline

Activity: 2240



View Profile
January 23, 2012, 08:54:24 PM
 #20

Can someone remind me why BIP-12 has fallen out of favor?  OP_EVAL might add some amount of flexibility (regarding where a script is defined vs when it is actually executed), but none of these proposals seems radically different form one another.
BIP 12 cannot be statically analyzed. AFAIK no practical need for static analysis has surfaced yet, but so long as things are being rushed, it's not safe to say they won't in the future either...

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 »  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!