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Author Topic: Bitcoin Core causing severe congestion of Upload Network Bandwidth  (Read 1076 times)
tl121
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May 21, 2014, 06:27:13 PM
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I have Bitcoin Core   0.9.1.0  running through a DSL router with port 8333 open.  Since April this has worked well, but yesterday I observed that my Internet connection was horribly slow, with pings taking more than 1 second and lost packets. I examined the Network Traffic window of Bitcoin Core and observed that it was outputting traffic continuously (Red traffic) while not receiving any download traffic (Green traffic), not a normal pattern for these graphs.

I restarted Bitcoin Core and the problem ceased for a few hours.  The usual traffic pattern of moderate Green traffic, with peaks on new blocks and a moderate level of Red traffic prevailed.  Unfortunately, this situation lasted for only a few hours and it was back to all Red traffic.

Have other people experienced this problem recently?  Is this some kind of attack on bitcoin nodes?  If other people have similar problems then I suspect that there is some serious work needed on the network side of Bitcoin Core to make it more network friendly, or some new attack that needs to be dealt with.

Meanwhile, I've closed port 8333 at my router and will see if this stops the congestion. I am presently running 9 connections and traffic patterns appear normal, with blocks being received and relayed quickly and a low level of background traffic, presumably memory pool activity.

Any comments?
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Transactions can optionally carry transaction fees. Whoever mines the block which ends up containing your transaction will get the fee. The Bitcoin client will sometimes force you to pay a fee when it thinks that no miner will accept your transaction otherwise.
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May 21, 2014, 06:34:40 PM
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I have Bitcoin Core   0.9.1.0  running through a DSL router with port 8333 open.  Since April this has worked well, but yesterday I observed that my Internet connection was horribly slow, with pings taking more than 1 second and lost packets. I examined the Network Traffic window of Bitcoin Core and observed that it was outputting traffic continuously (Red traffic) while not receiving any download traffic (Green traffic), not a normal pattern for these graphs.

I restarted Bitcoin Core and the problem ceased for a few hours.  The usual traffic pattern of moderate Green traffic, with peaks on new blocks and a moderate level of Red traffic prevailed.  Unfortunately, this situation lasted for only a few hours and it was back to all Red traffic.

Have other people experienced this problem recently?  Is this some kind of attack on bitcoin nodes?  If other people have similar problems then I suspect that there is some serious work needed on the network side of Bitcoin Core to make it more network friendly, or some new attack that needs to be dealt with.

Meanwhile, I've closed port 8333 at my router and will see if this stops the congestion. I am presently running 9 connections and traffic patterns appear normal, with blocks being received and relayed quickly and a low level of background traffic, presumably memory pool activity.

Any comments?


So basically you do something for the network (not just downloading, but also uploading) and you complain about it? Its perfectly normal behaviour if someone needs to download old blocks (or even the whole blockchain). If that makes your internet connection unusable you might want to use QoS (quality of service) or other form of traffic shaping on your router. Limiting bitcoin core's outgoing traffic to a low priority and upto 80% of your bandwith should do the trick.

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May 21, 2014, 07:57:00 PM
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It is not normal for congestion to degrade performance to the point where a network is unsable, nor is it normal for people using network software to be experts in congestion control. If bitcoin is to remain distributed and not just disappear into the cloud as a new form of centralized money, the core software needs to work correctly out of the box in the real world of ISP supplied routers.

Other peer to peer protocols and bulk data transfer programs that do file sync have dealt with these problems by automatically recognizing available bandwidth and setting limits and/or allowing the user to control them directly. (Examples are many bittorrent clients.)  It is not realistic to expect the average bitcoiner to set up QoS features in a router supplied by their ISP which may not even have these essential features and certainly lacks decent documentation.

While this degradation was in effect I also observed that the stale rate seen by my miners doubled, even though they were running on a completely separate computer from Bitcoin Core.
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May 21, 2014, 08:24:31 PM
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It is not normal for congestion to degrade performance to the point where a network is unsable, nor is it normal for people using network software to be experts in congestion control. If bitcoin is to remain distributed and not just disappear into the cloud as a new form of centralized money, the core software needs to work correctly out of the box in the real world of ISP supplied routers.

Other peer to peer protocols and bulk data transfer programs that do file sync have dealt with these problems by automatically recognizing available bandwidth and setting limits and/or allowing the user to control them directly. (Examples are many bittorrent clients.)  It is not realistic to expect the average bitcoiner to set up QoS features in a router supplied by their ISP which may not even have these essential features and certainly lacks decent documentation.

While this degradation was in effect I also observed that the stale rate seen by my miners doubled, even though they were running on a completely separate computer from Bitcoin Core.


If your connection was saturated, your latency would be degraded so you would have seen the stale rate increase even though they were on a different machine. 
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May 21, 2014, 09:13:21 PM
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No, it's not an attack. Someone is just downloading blocks from you. Bitcoin core doesn't have rate control so the only ways of dealing with this is with qos or disabling inbound connections.
Have other people experienced this problem recently?  Is this some kind of attack on bitcoin nodes?  If other people have similar problems then I suspect that there is some serious work needed on the network side of Bitcoin Core to make it more network friendly, or some new attack that needs to be dealt with.
This problem has been around for years. If you search around, there are many topics on this dating back to 2012-2011.

It is pitch black. You are likely to be eaten by a grue.

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May 21, 2014, 09:37:59 PM
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I found that Windows 7 Professional allows for QoS through the Group Policy editor.  I set up a policy that limited bitcoind.exe to about 50% of the available bandwidth and I reopened my router to inbound connections.  Hopefully, this will solve my problem.


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May 21, 2014, 11:39:38 PM
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If you're on Windows, get Netlimiter.  It's awesome for things like that.

i.e. Steam only has the option to limit to 500kb/s or 1MB/s, and it doesn't even do a very good job with it at that.... Since I have 10mbps downstream, both of those options suck.  1MB/s is close to saturating my downstream and 500kb/s uses half... so I set it to 900kbps in Netlimiter and it sticks to exactly that.  

alternatively, you could do what I do with my home bitcoin client... just connect to one IP

Dacentec, best deals for US dedicated servers. They regularly restock $20-$25 Opterons with 8-16GB RAM & 2x1-2TB HDD's (ofc, usually lots of other good stuff to choose from).  I did a Serverbear benchmark of one of my $20/mo Opteron (June last year), it's here.  Have had about a half dozen different servers with Dacentec, & none have failed to sustain at least 40MB/s (burst higher). My favorite is a 12-month rent-to-own ZT Systems 2XL5520 16GB 2x2TB SATA for $40/month (got lucky with the 'off-brand', haven't seen a RTO 2xL5520 for under $50/mo since -- at least for monthly contracts).  wholesaleinternet.com has some ancient 2-core intel CPUs @ $10/mo sometimes (I got an Intel Core 2 6300 @ 1.86GHz, with a 250GB HDD with 46000 hours on it, LOL. $20 @ Dacentec is much better, if you can grab one). joesdatacenter.com (same location as Wholesale Internet) also occasionally has specials (or if you don't want to wait, it has an AMD Opteron 170 @ $16/mo).
shorena
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May 22, 2014, 06:29:46 AM
 #8

It is not normal for congestion to degrade performance to the point where a network is unsable, nor is it normal for people using network software to be experts in congestion control. If bitcoin is to remain distributed and not just disappear into the cloud as a new form of centralized money, the core software needs to work correctly out of the box in the real world of ISP supplied routers.

Yes it is normal for networks to become unusable when a single service is to demanding.

"Normal" people dont open ports. By opening a port you say: "Hello Internet I am a Server now, please enjoy your stay". You should be aware of this. There might be lot of "internet" coming your way. Well, you ask for it by opening the port.
Most ISPs give you the worst possible router. If you are lucky you can just make a DMZ and forward all traffic to your actual router that knows how to handle traffic. Sometimes the hardware is fine, so you just need new software (e.g. OpenWRT), but depending on the country you life in, that might be illegal. Sometimes you want to build your own router (see fli4l) or just invest a little in a good router (a linksys wrt54gl still does amazing work).

The bitcoin core software works correctly out of the box, noone asked you to open your port and configure your router to forward traffic. While its nice that you want to support the network, it can be demanding. So -as sugested- either stop supporting (close port) or shape traffic (QoS etc., proper router, local solution)

Other peer to peer protocols and bulk data transfer programs that do file sync have dealt with these problems by automatically recognizing available bandwidth and setting limits and/or allowing the user to control them directly.

It took them years. I dont use bittorrent anymore, but I have been around when you couldnt even get your mails because a single user in your network had a bittorrent client running for over 1 hour. And that was on a 2MBit/s connection when most peopl still had dial up connections. Bittorrent used to kill routers because of the number of connections and clog up the network without proper QoS. Many modern BT clients support some form of bandwith limitation because otherwise noone would use them. In every home network I managed for the past 10 years you "felt" when someone turned on the bittorrent client. Even with QoS bittorent is hard to handle when you still want VoIP and gaming, because you can only shape the traffic in your network, not the responses from the internet.

(Examples are many bittorrent clients.)  It is not realistic to expect the average bitcoiner to set up QoS features in a router supplied by their ISP which may not even have these essential features and certainly lacks decent documentation.

As I said above, most ISPs wont even give you a router that is able (by software) to do QoS. But imho it is also not realistic to expect the average bitcoiner to setup a server and open ports.

While this degradation was in effect I also observed that the stale rate seen by my miners doubled, even though they were running on a completely separate computer from Bitcoin Core.


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May 25, 2014, 03:59:23 AM
 #9



https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/issues/273
Quote
Speed limit / throttle network usage #273 Open
slothbag opened this issue on May 26, 2011


Quote
You misunderstand how open source development works. We work on this in our
spare time so we decide for ourselves what is important and want to spend
time on.

If you want something to be very badly implemented it is *your*
responsibility to make that happen, not ours.

Can you contribute to solving this issue?

Or are you willing to pay to have the feature implemented? You could offer
an bounty.


Such is life.

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May 25, 2014, 02:48:53 PM
 #10

http://www.netlimiter.com/nl4testing.php

has a 30 day (or 28?) trial with all features.

i've been using it for a while, so i don't know if they improved the uninstaller or not, but you used to have to remove some drivers manually when uninstalling.  would rank it up there in the top 3 utils for windows



my settings for wtfleg

Dacentec, best deals for US dedicated servers. They regularly restock $20-$25 Opterons with 8-16GB RAM & 2x1-2TB HDD's (ofc, usually lots of other good stuff to choose from).  I did a Serverbear benchmark of one of my $20/mo Opteron (June last year), it's here.  Have had about a half dozen different servers with Dacentec, & none have failed to sustain at least 40MB/s (burst higher). My favorite is a 12-month rent-to-own ZT Systems 2XL5520 16GB 2x2TB SATA for $40/month (got lucky with the 'off-brand', haven't seen a RTO 2xL5520 for under $50/mo since -- at least for monthly contracts).  wholesaleinternet.com has some ancient 2-core intel CPUs @ $10/mo sometimes (I got an Intel Core 2 6300 @ 1.86GHz, with a 250GB HDD with 46000 hours on it, LOL. $20 @ Dacentec is much better, if you can grab one). joesdatacenter.com (same location as Wholesale Internet) also occasionally has specials (or if you don't want to wait, it has an AMD Opteron 170 @ $16/mo).
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