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Author Topic: death of a star??  (Read 718 times)
indiguy
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May 29, 2014, 07:23:46 AM
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The process will take decades as far as I know too. take for example comets take years to even disappear.
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May 29, 2014, 07:30:13 AM
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I just saw a star die, i was smoking a cig and looked up and noticed a star was bigger and brighter than normal, then it turned blue, then red, then it shrunk quickly and completely disappeared from the sky, does nasa have a way to confirm this?
IMAO no way light can travel that fast to you to even see it with the naked eye like that buy I could be wrong.  I see  stars turn colors all the time from glares.  which star was it, you should be able to read it from the constellations

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May 29, 2014, 07:48:40 AM
 #23

I just saw a star die, i was smoking a cig and looked up and noticed a star was bigger and brighter than normal, then it turned blue, then red, then it shrunk quickly and completely disappeared from the sky, does nasa have a way to confirm this?
IMAO no way light can travel that fast to you to even see it with the naked eye like that buy I could be wrong.  I see  stars turn colors all the time from glares.  which star was it, you should be able to read it from the constellations

God people are stupid around here.  Light travels at 186,000 miles per second.  What does it matter if you are a block away or 25 light years?  The light still travels at that speed.  You are not seeing the event in "real time", just the time it took for light to travel to you.  In fact we can see star light from 13.5 billion years ago (estimated age of the universe)  And if you had read the thread, I posted a link showing that you can in fact see a star explode with your naked eyes.

http://www.space.com/22453-nova-delphinus-star-explosion-naked-eye.html
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May 29, 2014, 07:51:03 AM
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I just saw a star die, i was smoking a cig and looked up and noticed a star was bigger and brighter than normal, then it turned blue, then red, then it shrunk quickly and completely disappeared from the sky, does nasa have a way to confirm this?
IMAO no way light can travel that fast to you to even see it with the naked eye like that buy I could be wrong.  I see  stars turn colors all the time from glares.  which star was it, you should be able to read it from the constellations

God people are stupid around here.  Light travels at 186,000 per second.  What does it matter if you are a block away or 25 light years?  The light still travels at that speed.  You are not seeing the event in "real time", just the time it took for light to travel to you.  In fact we can see star light from 13.5 billion years ago (estimated age of the universe)  And if you had read the thread, I posted a link showing that you can in fact see a star explode with your naked eyes.

http://www.space.com/22453-nova-delphinus-star-explosion-naked-eye.html

haha, you said what i thought but didn't want to say out loud. i don't even understand what he's talking about... light not being fast enough to see? i.. don't know.
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May 29, 2014, 10:09:32 AM
 #25

I just saw a star die, i was smoking a cig and looked up and noticed a star was bigger and brighter than normal, then it turned blue, then red, then it shrunk quickly and completely disappeared from the sky, does nasa have a way to confirm this?
IMAO no way light can travel that fast to you to even see it with the naked eye like that buy I could be wrong.  I see  stars turn colors all the time from glares.  which star was it, you should be able to read it from the constellations

God people are stupid around here.  Light travels at 186,000 per second.  What does it matter if you are a block away or 25 light years?  The light still travels at that speed.  You are not seeing the event in "real time", just the time it took for light to travel to you.  In fact we can see star light from 13.5 billion years ago (estimated age of the universe)  And if you had read the thread, I posted a link showing that you can in fact see a star explode with your naked eyes.

http://www.space.com/22453-nova-delphinus-star-explosion-naked-eye.html

I can travel at over 186,000 nanometers per second! Remember to include your units.

But yes, people here seem to lack basic science knowledge. I wonder if it's a regional thing (a lot of people that lack a basic science education seem to be Indian).

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