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Author Topic: Our Habanero board build pictures  (Read 644 times)
bronan
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June 04, 2014, 12:29:40 AM
 #1

We ordered a couple of habanero boards from Peppermining

These boards will get hot i decided to go with a fairly new watercooling complete solution
Since i was not impressed by the performance of the corsair one we choose another solution.

The one we decided to use is the coolermaster nepton 280l Unboxing video here

The full album with the pictures made this far Habanero build pictures

First you need to attach the radiator to the board which is done by our engineer
Put the spacers where the screw holes are for the water block
Apply the thermal paste on the waterblock and then put the watercooler block onto 4 cores of the Habanero

If you would like your habanero to be mounted and prepared by our engineer you can contact me by pm
Ofcourse you pay the postage, handling, needed parts and the time our engineer need to build and test the board
If you want to buy a second batch Habanero and want us to fix the cooler then contact us first before order.
After payement received you receive the address to send the boards to which you can put into the order form.
 
 



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June 04, 2014, 05:49:58 AM
 #2

that looks fantastic!
one possible change... depending on orientation, maybe flip the fans.  this way they would pull which is more efficient in the radiator, and would blow air across the backplate Wink
of course i could be wrong too  Shocked

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June 04, 2014, 06:22:45 AM
 #3

What screws did you use to hold down the pump?

What kind of standoffs are those?
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June 04, 2014, 06:25:17 AM
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Looks pretty good. I agree with jasemoney on the orientation of the fans. One other comment is that appears to be a ton of thermal paste. I have found that using so much causes problems. Perhaps I am wrong. I would be curious to know exactly what kind it is and what kind of performance you ultimately get out of your set up.

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June 04, 2014, 11:14:03 PM
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<engineer here> After a fair bit of consideration, I mounted the fans as I did due to the plans I had for mounting the pair of haba's in a ducted coldbox. They are going to receive a 4" duct of AC dedicated to their coldbox, with a second drawing away the heated air and exhausting it from the building.

I used some #5-40 (1/2 or 3/4" i can't rem) SHCS to mount the pump/block module to the board.

When i took the picture there was about 4x the amount of thermal paste as i left for actual mounting.  I used some very good paste that I use for some of our industrial applications (I don't have the spec on hand, can provide if needed).  Applied, rubbed around a bunch, spread with a razor, then scraped with a gauge that I made several years ago to leave .005-.010" of thermal compound in a nice even layer.  I always put a much larger patch of paste than the chip that is being sinked, and in this case, it's probably well over  6x the actual chip surface.

Didn't take pictures of the ducted cold box...it's ugly as homemade soap...its done gorilla style (ugly but tough)
Testing at present how the boards run at current build
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June 04, 2014, 11:48:22 PM
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<engineer here> After a fair bit of consideration, I mounted the fans as I did due to the plans I had for mounting the pair of haba's in a ducted coldbox. They are going to receive a 4" duct of AC dedicated to their coldbox, with a second drawing away the heated air and exhausting it from the building.

I used some #5-40 (1/2 or 3/4" i can't rem) SHCS to mount the pump/block module to the board.

When i took the picture there was about 4x the amount of thermal paste as i left for actual mounting.  I used some very good paste that I use for some of our industrial applications (I don't have the spec on hand, can provide if needed).  Applied, rubbed around a bunch, spread with a razor, then scraped with a gauge that I made several years ago to leave .005-.010" of thermal compound in a nice even layer.  I always put a much larger patch of paste than the chip that is being sinked, and in this case, it's probably well over  6x the actual chip surface.

Didn't take pictures of the ducted cold box...it's ugly as homemade soap...its done gorilla style (ugly but tough)
Testing at present how the boards run at current build
I figured as much. Your clarification will probably save a few people from some thermal paste induced agony. I assume you are using NON conductive past as well. For those that don't know the difference, loading up a big patch of Arctic Silver or something similar could really cause problems. Do let us know your final performance numbers and type of paste. Always curious to hear whats working best.

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