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Author Topic: What we've learnt today.  (Read 78554 times)
Phinnaeus Gage
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November 21, 2012, 06:24:03 AM
 #341

Taking 5 year old Tramadol fucks you up. You're not going to believe this, but I took a falling barn to the knee. At least I didn't drop the running chainsaw. It happened so slow motion. I had enough time to clear the falling barn, but didn't take into consideration the lumber pile that was amass in my escape route, coupled with the sun being at the horizon obscured by clouds. I gave up on trying to sleep, hence this post. Amazingly, it's being penned grammatically correct, but when morning comes, I'll re-read it and see if that truism still holds water.

~Frank~
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November 21, 2012, 07:00:29 AM
 #342

Taking 5 year old Tramadol fucks you up. You're not going to believe this, but I took a falling barn to the knee. At least I didn't drop the running chainsaw. It happened so slow motion. I had enough time to clear the falling barn, but didn't take into consideration the lumber pile that was amass in my escape route, coupled with the sun being at the horizon obscured by clouds. I gave up on trying to sleep, hence this post. Amazingly, it's being penned grammatically correct, but when morning comes, I'll re-read it and see if that truism still holds water.

~Frank~

Quoted for truth.

Also:

I gave up on trying to sleep, hence this post.

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  General Statistics - Phinnaeus Gage
   
Total Time Spent Online:    88 days, 15 hours and 16 minutes.
Total Posts:    9320 posts
Total Topics Started:    299 topics
Number of Polls Created:    25 polls
Number of Votes Cast:    90 votes

Lastly, and most importantly: get better, Phinn!


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Your mining rig is on fire, yet you're very calm.
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November 21, 2012, 07:05:24 AM
 #343

Back in early 1940's, when everything in USSR was heavily rationed and appropriated for the war, my grandpa used to steal wire which the fences around people's houses were made out of. He then sold them the service of wiring up their houses for electricity, using their own stolen wire.

My dad and his friend were caught stealing a stove and sentence to a Belgium reformatory during his formidable youth. He was released in time to travel with his family aboard the U.S.S America to Ellis Island in the mid 50's. Years later, while working at Pyle National in Chicago, he was a machinist, the only person capable of producing gold plated hardest unknown material at the time for the US military spy planes. Many other parts left the factory hidden in his socks to be sold as scrap to feed his family (his handsome paycheck found its way to the local pubs). He finally got wise and quit selling to the scrap dealer for pennies on the dollar. He sold it for nickels on the dollar to the competition of which he had an insider as the purchasing agent, thus splitting the loot. As a kid, it was great for me, for I was upgraded from using a cane pole to a Abu Garcia 170.

My first descendent  to emigrate to Australia was a prizefighter who broke a guy's jaw in his first fight in Australia and donated the purse money on the hospital bill  Cheesy

Phinnaeus Gage
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November 21, 2012, 08:48:51 AM
 #344

Taking 5 year old Tramadol fucks you up. You're not going to believe this, but I took a falling barn to the knee. At least I didn't drop the running chainsaw. It happened so slow motion. I had enough time to clear the falling barn, but didn't take into consideration the lumber pile that was amass in my escape route, coupled with the sun being at the horizon obscured by clouds. I gave up on trying to sleep, hence this post. Amazingly, it's being penned grammatically correct, but when morning comes, I'll re-read it and see if that truism still holds water.

~Frank~

Quoted for truth.

Also:

I gave up on trying to sleep, hence this post.

Quote
  General Statistics - Phinnaeus Gage
   
Total Time Spent Online:    88 days, 15 hours and 16 minutes.
Total Posts:    9320 posts
Total Topics Started:    299 topics
Number of Polls Created:    25 polls
Number of Votes Cast:    90 votes

Lastly, and most importantly: get better, Phinn!


Going to try to go to sleep now. Thanks for the get better. Old pill is working somewhat but got a slight headache.

Gong to leave this so I can review it again later: http://www.crowdrise.com/InnovateSalone

Nite, John Boy!
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November 21, 2012, 12:39:31 PM
 #345

Taking 5 year old Tramadol fucks you up. You're not going to believe this, but I took a falling barn to the knee. At least I didn't drop the running chainsaw. It happened so slow motion. I had enough time to clear the falling barn, but didn't take into consideration the lumber pile that was amass in my escape route, coupled with the sun being at the horizon obscured by clouds. I gave up on trying to sleep, hence this post. Amazingly, it's being penned grammatically correct, but when morning comes, I'll re-read it and see if that truism still holds water.

~Frank~

Quoted for truth.

Also:

I gave up on trying to sleep, hence this post.

Quote
  General Statistics - Phinnaeus Gage
   
Total Time Spent Online:    88 days, 15 hours and 16 minutes.
Total Posts:    9320 posts
Total Topics Started:    299 topics
Number of Polls Created:    25 polls
Number of Votes Cast:    90 votes

Lastly, and most importantly: get better, Phinn!


Going to try to go to sleep now. Thanks for the get better. Old pill is working somewhat but got a slight headache.

Gong to leave this so I can review it again later: http://www.crowdrise.com/InnovateSalone

Nite, John Boy!

I used to be a sleeper, then I took a barn to the knee.

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Phinnaeus Gage
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November 21, 2012, 07:07:16 PM
 #346

Taking 5 year old Tramadol fucks you up. You're not going to believe this, but I took a falling barn to the knee. At least I didn't drop the running chainsaw. It happened so slow motion. I had enough time to clear the falling barn, but didn't take into consideration the lumber pile that was amass in my escape route, coupled with the sun being at the horizon obscured by clouds. I gave up on trying to sleep, hence this post. Amazingly, it's being penned grammatically correct, but when morning comes, I'll re-read it and see if that truism still holds water.

~Frank~

Quoted for truth.

Also:

I gave up on trying to sleep, hence this post.

Quote
 General Statistics - Phinnaeus Gage
   
Total Time Spent Online:    88 days, 15 hours and 16 minutes.
Total Posts:    9320 posts
Total Topics Started:    299 topics
Number of Polls Created:    25 polls
Number of Votes Cast:    90 votes

Lastly, and most importantly: get better, Phinn!


Going to try to go to sleep now. Thanks for the get better. Old pill is working somewhat but got a slight headache.

Gong to leave this so I can review it again later: http://www.crowdrise.com/InnovateSalone

Nite, John Boy!

I used to be a sleeper, then I took a barn to the knee.

Very seldom am I in the field doing the actual work, only acting as the procurer, buyer and seller of barn wood. But this barn, after being stripped, became unstable, and all my subcontractors were either busy elsewhere or made themselves unavailable, preparing themselves for the upcoming holiday.

Even after carefully planning the collapse via physics, and taking every foreseeable precautions, shit still happened. It could have been a lot worse, for it came down quicker than I imagined it would. I was working alone until the owner decided to show up, wanting to watch it fall. I was always mindful of where he was standing, but after the collapse, I realized he wasn't in the perfect spot, for it careened past his observation point. Luckily that 70+ year old back up enough to watch it fall directly in front of him.

He then came to where I was laying, still grasping the chainsaw, asking if I was okay. Realizing that nothing was broken, but knew I was hurting, I lied to him and said that I was fine. We rapped a little more, then he left to go home.

I'll post images later of the pre-collapse and of the barn on the ground. Meanwhile, I'm enjoying high the from the outdated Tramadol.

~Tony~ (using various names to humorously insinuate that I'm fucked up in the head)
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November 21, 2012, 07:31:22 PM
 #347

Today I've learnt that about 34 millions years ago, there used to be two-meter tall penguins living in Antartica.

http://phys.org/news/2012-11-argentine-experts-giant-penguin-fossils.html
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November 23, 2012, 07:12:31 PM
 #348

Today I've learnt that about 34 millions years ago, there used to be two-meter tall penguins living in Antartica.

http://phys.org/news/2012-11-argentine-experts-giant-penguin-fossils.html


Terrifying.


Wasn't the world great when it had more oxygen in the atmosphere...

"Bitcoin has been an amazing ride, but the most fascinating part to me is the seemingly universal tendency of libertarians to immediately become authoritarians the very moment they are given any measure of power to silence the dissent of others."  - The Bible
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November 23, 2012, 07:26:01 PM
 #349

Today I've learnt that about 34 millions years ago, there used to be two-meter tall penguins living in Antartica.

http://phys.org/news/2012-11-argentine-experts-giant-penguin-fossils.html
Wasn't the world great when it had more oxygen in the atmosphere...

I'm pretty sure the oxygen levels at that time were not much different than today.  I think it was during Paleozoic that they were much higher.

It's true though that before Holocene there used to be all kinds of large animals everywhere, but on the other hand the largest animal who's ever lived on earth still lives today.
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November 23, 2012, 07:47:14 PM
 #350

Today I've learnt that about 34 millions years ago, there used to be two-meter tall penguins living in Antartica.

http://phys.org/news/2012-11-argentine-experts-giant-penguin-fossils.html
Wasn't the world great when it had more oxygen in the atmosphere...

I'm pretty sure the oxygen levels at that time were not much different than today.  I think it was during Paleozoic that they were much higher.

It's true though that before Holocene there used to be all kinds of large animals everywhere, but on the other hand the largest animal who's ever lived on earth still lives today.

Sad thing is there where large Animals almost in every region in the world. Mammoth and Rhinoceros in Europe, Elephants in America and even 3 meter Marsupials in Australia. They all disappeared when the first humos showed up, probably due to them beeing easy prey. A Mammoth didn't fear humans. The only region they survived (on a larger scale) is Africa because this is where Humans evolved and the animals "learned" to view us as the threat we are.


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November 23, 2012, 10:32:25 PM
 #351

Your post includes much conjecture, and should be presented as such:

Sad thing is there where large Animals almost in every region in the world. Mammoth and Rhinoceros in Europe, Elephants in America and even 3 meter Marsupials in Australia. They all disappeared when the first humos showed up, probably possibly due to them beeing easy prey. A Mammoth didn't fear humans. The only region they survived (on a larger scale) is Africa because this is where Humans evolved and the animals might have "learned" to view us as the threat we are.



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Phinnaeus Gage
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November 23, 2012, 10:47:54 PM
 #352

Your post includes much conjecture, and should be presented as such:

Sad thing is there where large Animals almost in every region in the world. Mammoth and Rhinoceros in Europe, Elephants in America and even 3 meter Marsupials in Australia. They all disappeared when the first humos showed up, probably possibly due to them beeing easy prey. A Mammoth didn't fear humans. The only region they survived (on a larger scale) is Africa because this is where Humans evolved and the animals might have "learned" to view us as the threat we are.


There's only one creature worse than a Conjecture Nazi.

Sad thing is there were large Animals in almost every region of the world. Mammoths and rhinoceros in Europe, elephants in America, and even three-meter tall marsupials in Australia. They all disappeared when the first humans arrived, possibly due to being easy prey. A mammoth didn't fear humans. The only region they survived (on a larger scale) is Africa because this is where Humans evolved and the animals might have "learned" to view us as the threat we are.

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November 23, 2012, 10:51:48 PM
 #353

Your post includes much conjecture, and should be presented as such:

Sad thing is there where large Animals almost in every region in the world. Mammoth and Rhinoceros in Europe, Elephants in America and even 3 meter Marsupials in Australia. They all disappeared when the first humos showed up, probably possibly due to them beeing easy prey. A Mammoth didn't fear humans. The only region they survived (on a larger scale) is Africa because this is where Humans evolved and the animals might have "learned" to view us as the threat we are.


Sorry, of course it should. It's a controversial theory after all. Wasn't my intention to present it as facts.

But I don't really understand what the difference between probably and possibly is in this context.

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November 23, 2012, 10:53:21 PM
 #354


....

There's only one creature worse than a Conjecture Nazi.

....


In this case there are competing hypotheses. I don't like people dumbing down science, or misrepresenting it (albeit an accidental misrepresentation). In the end you finish up with "the Bermuda Triangle" and spoonbending.

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November 23, 2012, 10:55:34 PM
 #355

But I don't really understand what the difference between probably and possibly is in this context.

"Probably" means the balance of possibility is in favour of your hypothesis - ie it's more likely than any other. This isn't the case.

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November 23, 2012, 10:57:17 PM
 #356

Your post includes much conjecture, and should be presented as such:

Sad thing is there where large Animals almost in every region in the world. Mammoth and Rhinoceros in Europe, Elephants in America and even 3 meter Marsupials in Australia. They all disappeared when the first humos showed up, probably possibly due to them beeing easy prey. A Mammoth didn't fear humans. The only region they survived (on a larger scale) is Africa because this is where Humans evolved and the animals might have "learned" to view us as the threat we are.


Sorry, of course it should. It's a controversial theory after all. Wasn't my intention to present it as facts.

Well, it is not certain for all megafauna, but it is pretty much sure for a lot of large animals, such as aurochs, Moa, thylacine, and so on.   Many fascinating creatures have been wiped out by humans in the last thousands years, and that is kind of sad indeed.
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November 23, 2012, 11:00:28 PM
 #357

Well, it is not certain for all megafauna, but it is pretty much sure for a lot of large animals, such as aurochs, Moa, thylacine, and so on.   Many fascinating creatures have been wiped out by humans in the last thousands years, and that is kind of sad indeed.

I was only referring to those mentioned in the post - woolly mammoth, rhino, and Australian megafauna. There's evidence that they began to disappear as humans arrived, but ecological conditions changed at those points in time too.

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November 23, 2012, 11:10:56 PM
 #358

Well, it is not certain for all megafauna, but it is pretty much sure for a lot of large animals, such as aurochs, Moa, thylacine, and so on.   Many fascinating creatures have been wiped out by humans in the last thousands years, and that is kind of sad indeed.

I was only referring to those mentioned in the post - woolly mammoth, rhino, and Australian megafauna. There's evidence that they began to disappear as humans arrived, but ecological conditions changed at those points in time too.

Yes, I was explicit referring to the Quaternary extinction. Which was the disappearance of a huge amount of the worlds megafauna. On theory on this is the overkill hypothesis, which makes the appearance of humans responsible for this event.

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November 23, 2012, 11:17:49 PM
 #359



Well, it is not certain for all megafauna, but it is pretty much sure for a lot of large animals, such as aurochs, Moa, thylacine, and so on.   Many fascinating creatures have been wiped out by humans in the last thousands years, and that is kind of sad indeed.

On what basis are you classifying the thylacine as "megafauna"?  The oldest of the species fossils discovered to date indicate that the first thylacines (over 20 million years ago) were actually smaller than the "modern" thylacine (4 million years ago).  Even the modern thylacine was a relatively small animal for an apex predator and definitely not in the "mega-fauna" or even "large animal" class.

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/did-dingo-attacks-drive-the-tassie-tiger-extinct.htm

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November 23, 2012, 11:35:59 PM
 #360

Well, it is not certain for all megafauna, but it is pretty much sure for a lot of large animals, such as aurochs, Moa, thylacine, and so on.   Many fascinating creatures have been wiped out by humans in the last thousands years, and that is kind of sad indeed.

On what basis are you classifying the thylacine as "megafauna"?

I don't.  I was merely talking about "large animals", which is a non-scientific, subjective expression.
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