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Author Topic: Using the Blockchain to Document Intellectual Property Rights  (Read 6870 times)
luv2drnkbr
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August 25, 2014, 10:09:02 AM
 #21

https://pay.reddit.com/r/Bitcoin/comments/1zyvdt/dorians_lament/

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Razick
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September 05, 2014, 03:48:18 PM
 #22

"Intellectual Property"?  What is this the dark ages?  

Guess what if you put some information in the block chain I can read it and do whatever I like with that information.  

You don't have to put the information in the blockchain, you have to put the SIGNATURE of the information in the blockchain.

I'm not going to argue about IP, if you don't believe that musicians own their music and authors own their books, that's your problem, but I do.

EDIT: True, calling it proof of IP might be a little misleading, but as I explained it could be used to prove that (for example) the Bitcoin name was in use by someone other than Mt.Gox. before it was trademarked.

ACCOUNT RECOVERED 4/27/2020. Account was previously hacked sometime in 2017. Posts between 12/31/2016 and 4/27/2020 are NOT LEGITIMATE.
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October 16, 2014, 12:18:23 PM
 #23

I had to chime in here, I thought of this idea too!!! Great minds think alike eh? Smiley

I almost cannot see any downside with this : It's definitely better than the current way of investigation... For someone to dispute the claim, they'd have to say that the person pretty much held him to hostage and took the content and then hashed and "registered the existence"...

Coming to think of it, why a blockchain? Why not just a distributed database of hashes that is verified? The blockchain per se may not be necessary right?
Raystonn
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December 09, 2014, 12:29:06 AM
 #24

I had to chime in here, I thought of this idea too!!! Great minds think alike eh? Smiley

I almost cannot see any downside with this : It's definitely better than the current way of investigation... For someone to dispute the claim, they'd have to say that the person pretty much held him to hostage and took the content and then hashed and "registered the existence"...

Coming to think of it, why a blockchain? Why not just a distributed database of hashes that is verified? The blockchain per se may not be necessary right?

Verified by whom?  The blockchain provides the verification.
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December 15, 2014, 04:50:46 PM
 #25

Very unique way of copyrighting intellectual property. From my experience and what I learned about copyrights, is that a copyright claim doesn't need to be filed with any particular government entity, and so long as you can prove that "YOU" published the work in question, by default you are the owner of the copyright. So, for example; if I publish a time stamped news article and then someone copies it, and I take them to court for copyright infringement, so long as I can show that I published the content first, then I am the true holder of the copyright. Integrating copyright material into the blockchain is a very good way of doing this, since the blockchain can not be altered nor the time stamp can be changed. Great stuff.
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December 15, 2014, 11:33:44 PM
 #26

This does a lot less than what most people think it does...

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I must prove that I was the first person to come up with an idea.
Quote
so long as I can show that I published the content first

And yet what the poster goes on to describe does not actually accomplish that.  (and, technically, as an aside being first it not really as relevant for copyright, since independent creation is possible and permitted)

Say you invent something.  Now I can go timestamp it.  And claim to have invented it.

Say you invent something and timestamp it.  I can say "I invented it first, he just timestamped a copy of my idea."

We can both timestamp the same thing (or substantially the same thing) and interdependently go show our timestamps to third parties who will never be aware of the other claim.

These ideas are not new... people were commuting to things back in 2010. These ideas reoccur ever couple of months when people don't bother to do any research and see it's all been done before... people just lose interest in it because its limited enough that the value isn't so great.

Worse, most of the reoccurring proposals are highly inefficient (e.g. require a transaction per commitment, when technically no transactions are required _at all_ to get timestamps), or even outright insecure. (Competent folks have mostly given up reviewing ideas from people who don't spend even a moment doing research.)
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December 17, 2014, 02:48:37 PM
 #27

(e.g. require a transaction per commitment, when technically no transactions are required _at all_ to get timestamps),

What exactly do you mean with this?
JackH
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December 25, 2014, 07:50:15 PM
 #28

I find this way more interesting to be used for storing third party data that can later be verified.

What I still dont get from this post is if the data stored and timestamped can be "big".

For example, if I wanted to store 10000 sessions per second, would it even be possible via the blockchain hash? For the sake of the conversation, lets say these are orders on a very large web store, and I want to store the price + time of the order of an item.

<helo> funny that this proposal grows the maximum block size to 8GB, and is seen as a compromise
<helo> oh, you don't like a 20x increase? well how about 8192x increase?
<JackH> lmao
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December 30, 2014, 01:13:01 PM
 #29

I find this way more interesting to be used for storing third party data that can later be verified.

What I still dont get from this post is if the data stored and timestamped can be "big".

For example, if I wanted to store 10000 sessions per second, would it even be possible via the blockchain hash? For the sake of the conversation, lets say these are orders on a very large web store, and I want to store the price + time of the order of an item.

In your terminology, yes, the data can be "big". As "big" as you want. From your example, I think you'd be interested in what Factom are doing - http://factom.org/.

JackH
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December 30, 2014, 07:03:09 PM
Last edit: December 30, 2014, 07:50:20 PM by JackH
 #30

I find this way more interesting to be used for storing third party data that can later be verified.

What I still dont get from this post is if the data stored and timestamped can be "big".

For example, if I wanted to store 10000 sessions per second, would it even be possible via the blockchain hash? For the sake of the conversation, lets say these are orders on a very large web store, and I want to store the price + time of the order of an item.

In your terminology, yes, the data can be "big". As "big" as you want. From your example, I think you'd be interested in what Factom are doing - http://factom.org/.

From a quick glance I cant gather if they utilize sending a Bitcoin dust payment to an address or not. Do you know? If they do, it wouldn be good as the dust can quickly run into billions.

EDIT: Nevermind, they use a local merkle tree and gather multiple values in one batch and hash that. I guess we either get sidechains or we keep getting these "solutions" to data storage.

<helo> funny that this proposal grows the maximum block size to 8GB, and is seen as a compromise
<helo> oh, you don't like a 20x increase? well how about 8192x increase?
<JackH> lmao
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