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Author Topic: BitFury 110GH/s per rack?  (Read 10088 times)
rjk
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May 22, 2012, 01:39:21 PM
 #21

Holy epic shiet, this is an awesome setup.

EDIT: I'm pretty sure someone has this in their profile pic...

http://bitfury.org/bitstream/shafull.jpg

That was eldentyrell with his own FPGA configuration Tongue
No, his was 3 distinct colors for each of the unrolled hashers.

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May 22, 2012, 03:26:07 PM
 #22

Nice chilled water setup to keep those cores cool. This is the shit I'd like to do, if I knew how to program for FPGAs. I have the cooling experience but lack that critical skill  Grin

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May 22, 2012, 04:48:43 PM
 #23

RS485 bus. I had same idea months ago... I need to quit job...

Under development Modular UPGRADEABLE Miner (MUM). Looking for investors.
Changing one PCB with screwdriver and you have brand new miner in hand... Plug&Play, scalable from one module to thousands.
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May 22, 2012, 04:59:43 PM
 #24

For those of you that were trying to figure out the network overhead, here is some good info:

Quote
110 Gigahash/sec (two SHA256)
25.6 partial solutions (shares) per second
40 getworks per second (only partial range scan)

Also, those copper busses look like exactly what I need for my rig. I'll have to study the pics a bit more.

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May 22, 2012, 05:35:44 PM
 #25

This thread is boring, it's just speculation on a very uncompetitive product.
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May 22, 2012, 05:42:32 PM
 #26

This thread is boring, it's just speculation on a very uncompetitive product.
Although the parts may not be very modern, the ideas and things surrounding it are very relevant and fun to discuss. Theoretically if designed correctly, it should be possible to replace all the little FPGA modules with 28nm models when those come along, or even specially designed ASICs.

Mining Rig Extraordinaire - the Trenton BPX6806 18-slot PCIe backplane [PICS] Dead project is dead, all hail the coming of the mighty ASIC!
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May 22, 2012, 05:57:50 PM
 #27

This thread is boring, it's just speculation on a very uncompetitive product.
Although the parts may not be very modern, the ideas and things surrounding it are very relevant and fun to discuss. Theoretically if designed correctly, it should be possible to replace all the little FPGA modules with 28nm models when those come along, or even specially designed ASICs.

Indeed, specialise in heating/cooling systems like that, make the FPGA/ASIC's modules, well, modular, publish specs, get me on the board of directors, lol. You got yourself a killer niche here.

I actually want to buy myself a few of those rigs minus FPGA modules.

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May 22, 2012, 06:03:19 PM
 #28

This thread is boring, it's just speculation on a very uncompetitive product.
Although the parts may not be very modern, the ideas and things surrounding it are very relevant and fun to discuss. Theoretically if designed correctly, it should be possible to replace all the little FPGA modules with 28nm models when those come along, or even specially designed ASICs.

28nm is still very far away.

on the -7 series the routing resource is far different form spartan6, so this design can not be simply transplant to -7 series, but this architecture is still useful.

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DeathAndTaxes
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May 22, 2012, 07:15:51 PM
 #29

This thread is boring, it's just speculation on a very uncompetitive product.
Although the parts may not be very modern, the ideas and things surrounding it are very relevant and fun to discuss. Theoretically if designed correctly, it should be possible to replace all the little FPGA modules with 28nm models when those come along, or even specially designed ASICs.

28nm is still very far away.

on the -7 series the routing resource is far different form spartan6, so this design can not be simply transplant to -7 series, but this architecture is still useful.
Any word yet if the low end -7 series will have metal heatspreader.  I would imagine you could get 20 to 30 Mhz more out of the Spartans if it like trying to pull that heat through the low conductivity plastic package.
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May 22, 2012, 07:19:29 PM
 #30

This thread is boring, it's just speculation on a very uncompetitive product.
Someone's being a little extra pissy this morning. I didn't see the sticky indicating that no FPGAs could be discussed unless it beats the BFL offerings.

I wouldn't say this is uncompetitive at all. If they built it for US$90K and it gets 110GH/s, it's the cheapest of the LX150 options. The power consumption is pretty high, but I'd be interested to see the actual breakdown. 110GH/s÷360 = 305MH/s, and they claim their 300MH/s bitstream consumes 12W which seems reasonable compared to other LX150s. For 360 FPGAs, that's 4.32kW. The remainder at 2.7kW seems a little high for the microcontroller backplanes, Atom boards and inefficiencies in the power supplies.

As for the price, it's moot since they haven't sold any at that price as far as anyone here knows. For that matter, BFL isn't selling their minirigs either. At this point they're just taking people's money as an interest free loan for an indeterminate amount of time.
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May 22, 2012, 07:40:34 PM
 #31

The woman, my first love had a tattoo of a butterfly a bit like this, so I am attracted to anything to do with butterflies and because of this, Butterfly Labs have won my heart as soon as I heard about them.

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May 22, 2012, 07:49:19 PM
 #32

The woman, my first love had a tattoo of a butterfly a bit like this, so I am attracted to anything to do with butterflies and because of this, Butterfly Labs have won my heart as soon as I heard about them.


Did she also have an ass like that?
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May 22, 2012, 07:57:23 PM
 #33

I wouldn't say this is uncompetitive at all. If they built it for US$90K and it gets 110GH/s, it's the cheapest of the LX150 options.

No, Enterpoint's cairnsmore1 pre-order prices are cheaper. It will do at the very least 800 Mh/s with an average-performing bitstream (more likely 850 Mh/s) at $640. This is 1.25 Mh/s/$ (more likely 1.33 Mh/s/$). BitFury is more expensive at 1.22 Mh/s/$.

I guess one could say BitFury is cheaper on a technicality: Cairnsmore1 has not shipped yet.
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May 22, 2012, 08:02:08 PM
 #34

I wouldn't say this is uncompetitive at all. If they built it for US$90K and it gets 110GH/s, it's the cheapest of the LX150 options.

No, Enterpoint's cairnsmore1 pre-order prices are cheaper. It will do at the very least 800 Mh/s with an average-performing bitstream (more likely 850 Mh/s) at $640. This is 1.25 Mh/s/$ (more likely 1.33 Mh/s/$). BitFury is more expensive at 1.22 Mh/s/$.

I guess one could say BitFury is cheaper on a technicality: Cairnsmore1 has not shipped yet.

The Cairnsmore are cheaper, but that's a time limited special offer (at least according to them). At the regular price of US$1280, they'd be more expensive.
ngzhang
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May 22, 2012, 08:06:56 PM
 #35

This thread is boring, it's just speculation on a very uncompetitive product.
Although the parts may not be very modern, the ideas and things surrounding it are very relevant and fun to discuss. Theoretically if designed correctly, it should be possible to replace all the little FPGA modules with 28nm models when those come along, or even specially designed ASICs.

28nm is still very far away.

on the -7 series the routing resource is far different form spartan6, so this design can not be simply transplant to -7 series, but this architecture is still useful.
Any word yet if the low end -7 series will have metal heatspreader.  I would imagine you could get 20 to 30 Mhz more out of the Spartans if it like trying to pull that heat through the low conductivity plastic package.

by our review, not only heat. Smiley
some thing other limit break out when we solved over-heat.

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rjk
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May 22, 2012, 08:10:09 PM
 #36

Any word yet if the low end -7 series will have metal heatspreader.  I would imagine you could get 20 to 30 Mhz more out of the Spartans if it like trying to pull that heat through the low conductivity plastic package.

by our review, not only heat. Smiley
some thing other limit break out when we solved over-heat.
How were you solving the overheat? Liquid nitrogen? Grin

Mining Rig Extraordinaire - the Trenton BPX6806 18-slot PCIe backplane [PICS] Dead project is dead, all hail the coming of the mighty ASIC!
Inspector 2211
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May 22, 2012, 08:34:09 PM
 #37

On their website, they state:
Then after choosing serial round design it was very challenging to fit it exactly into 240 slices (8 x 32 area). As you see in snapshot image on the left, magenta color shows exactly two SHA256 rounds location. These double-SHA256 with round and round expanders and additional control logic fits into 240 slices. This took another month of development. Fitting in 240 slices was important to obtain good fill of XC6SLX150 right part.

I hate to break the news, but 8 x 32 is not 240. It is 256. At least, where I grew up.  Roll Eyes

So, what did they really do? Fit two rounds of SHA-256 into 240 slices, including control logic? I find that hard to believe.
Or fit two rounds of SHA-256 into 256 slices - I find that slightly easier to believe, but it still would be a major achievement.
ngzhang
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May 22, 2012, 08:48:25 PM
 #38

On their website, they state:
Then after choosing serial round design it was very challenging to fit it exactly into 240 slices (8 x 32 area). As you see in snapshot image on the left, magenta color shows exactly two SHA256 rounds location. These double-SHA256 with round and round expanders and additional control logic fits into 240 slices. This took another month of development. Fitting in 240 slices was important to obtain good fill of XC6SLX150 right part.

I hate to break the news, but 8 x 32 is not 240. It is 256. At least, where I grew up.  Roll Eyes

So, what did they really do? Fit two rounds of SHA-256 into 240 slices, including control logic? I find that hard to believe.
Or fit two rounds of SHA-256 into 256 slices - I find that slightly easier to believe, but it still would be a major achievement.

i believe because we did just exactly the same.  2X 64cycle SHA256 core in 8X32 area, include control logic,  timing report is much over 300MHz.
the coding work is easy(maybe less than 50 lines.) but write the UCF files used month of time, and still have some small bugs now.  Smiley

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ngzhang
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May 22, 2012, 08:50:04 PM
 #39

Any word yet if the low end -7 series will have metal heatspreader.  I would imagine you could get 20 to 30 Mhz more out of the Spartans if it like trying to pull that heat through the low conductivity plastic package.

by our review, not only heat. Smiley
some thing other limit break out when we solved over-heat.
How were you solving the overheat? Liquid nitrogen? Grin

at present no comment, but
much easier than you think...  Grin

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Inspector 2211
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May 22, 2012, 10:49:13 PM
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On their website, they state:
Then after choosing serial round design it was very challenging to fit it exactly into 240 slices (8 x 32 area). As you see in snapshot image on the left, magenta color shows exactly two SHA256 rounds location. These double-SHA256 with round and round expanders and additional control logic fits into 240 slices. This took another month of development. Fitting in 240 slices was important to obtain good fill of XC6SLX150 right part.

I hate to break the news, but 8 x 32 is not 240. It is 256. At least, where I grew up.  Roll Eyes

So, what did they really do? Fit two rounds of SHA-256 into 240 slices, including control logic? I find that hard to believe.
Or fit two rounds of SHA-256 into 256 slices - I find that slightly easier to believe, but it still would be a major achievement.

i believe because we did just exactly the same.  2X 64cycle SHA256 core in 8X32 area, include control logic,  timing report is much over 300MHz.
the coding work is easy(maybe less than 50 lines.) but write the UCF files used month of time, and still have some small bugs now.  Smiley

My point was, that 8 x 32 is not 240. It is 256.
If you can fit this in only 240 slices, then maybe 16 x 15 is a better geometry, since 16 x 15 really is 240.
Or am I missing the point here?
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