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awesome31312
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November 11, 2014, 07:52:34 PM
 #21

Stay on topic guys!

That includes you, titlicker

What's the topic?  "This is ridiculous"  ??

"US carriers reportedly rejected anti-theft 'kill switch' in Samsung phones"

"Anti-theft insurance profits may trump consumer protection"

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November 11, 2014, 11:56:36 PM
 #22

Regarding the monitoring software on a phone I would consider it a weapon that can be used against you involuntarily
Cell towers already do that to an extent but I guess the difference is that if your phone is stolen and the police aren't after you its not going to be traced with the alternative of everything is logged and traced back to you whether you want it to be so or not.
this is a very good argument as to why this feature should not be implemented. However I would think that the phones would be disabled via the cell towers regardless so if they have no connection to the towers then the phone company would have no way of disabling it (for example if the phone was kept in airplane mode)
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November 12, 2014, 12:41:02 AM
 #23

Regarding the monitoring software on a phone I would consider it a weapon that can be used against you involuntarily
Cell towers already do that to an extent but I guess the difference is that if your phone is stolen and the police aren't after you its not going to be traced with the alternative of everything is logged and traced back to you whether you want it to be so or not.
this is a very good argument as to why this feature should not be implemented. However I would think that the phones would be disabled via the cell towers regardless so if they have no connection to the towers then the phone company would have no way of disabling it (for example if the phone was kept in airplane mode)

Well if they are dedicated enough someone can still get the phone to send a transmission via forcing the tower to geolocate it even in Airplane mode.

7. Police Can Activate Phone GPS Location Tracking
Can police access the GPS data on your phone? According to a recent court ruling, they can not only access it, but activate GPS location tracking if it's disabled. That's one takeaway from last week's U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ruling in a case involving Melvin Skinner, who was convicted of drug trafficking--and sentenced to 20 years in jail. Skinner argued that the GPS data tracking, which DEA agents used to track a motor home he was driving that was filled with 1,100 pounds of marijuana, violated his Fourth Amendment right against unreasonable search. In addition, according to a close reading of the court ruling, it turns out that police may not have merely tracked Skinner, but actually instructed his prepaid phone provider to activate the GPS functionality. The court, however, ruled that the DEA had acted lawfully.

http://www.darkreading.com/risk-management/7-facts-about-geolocation-privacy/d/d-id/1105877?

http://www.informationweek.com/mobile/lose-the-burners-court-okays-prepaid-phone-tracking/d/d-id/1105814?

Appeals court rules law enforcement agencies don't need a warrant to "ping" and track prepaid cellphone locations.
Prepaid cellphone users may be tracked by law enforcement agencies at any time, without police first having to obtain a probable-cause warrant.

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deluxeCITY
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November 12, 2014, 12:50:47 AM
 #24

Regarding the monitoring software on a phone I would consider it a weapon that can be used against you involuntarily
Cell towers already do that to an extent but I guess the difference is that if your phone is stolen and the police aren't after you its not going to be traced with the alternative of everything is logged and traced back to you whether you want it to be so or not.
this is a very good argument as to why this feature should not be implemented. However I would think that the phones would be disabled via the cell towers regardless so if they have no connection to the towers then the phone company would have no way of disabling it (for example if the phone was kept in airplane mode)

Well if they are dedicated enough someone can still get the phone to send a transmission via forcing the tower to geolocate it even in Airplane mode.

7. Police Can Activate Phone GPS Location Tracking
Can police access the GPS data on your phone? According to a recent court ruling, they can not only access it, but activate GPS location tracking if it's disabled. That's one takeaway from last week's U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ruling in a case involving Melvin Skinner, who was convicted of drug trafficking--and sentenced to 20 years in jail. Skinner argued that the GPS data tracking, which DEA agents used to track a motor home he was driving that was filled with 1,100 pounds of marijuana, violated his Fourth Amendment right against unreasonable search. In addition, according to a close reading of the court ruling, it turns out that police may not have merely tracked Skinner, but actually instructed his prepaid phone provider to activate the GPS functionality. The court, however, ruled that the DEA had acted lawfully.

http://www.darkreading.com/risk-management/7-facts-about-geolocation-privacy/d/d-id/1105877?

http://www.informationweek.com/mobile/lose-the-burners-court-okays-prepaid-phone-tracking/d/d-id/1105814?

Appeals court rules law enforcement agencies don't need a warrant to "ping" and track prepaid cellphone locations.
Prepaid cellphone users may be tracked by law enforcement agencies at any time, without police first having to obtain a probable-cause warrant.
WTF this is ridiculous. I would say this is likely some kind of vulnerability at the phone level, not the tower level, so in theory phones could be jailbroken to disable this ability (or google/apple could start using better morals and prevent this from happening at the hardware and/or OS level).

On somewhat of a side-note I would think this would be overturned via the supreme court as your phone's location is not public information and is very different from "metadata" that has generally been held that people do not have a reasonable expectation of keeping private. Not only that but if the phone was in airplane mode then it would be even more clear that the defendant did not want his location disclosed.
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November 12, 2014, 12:58:58 AM
 #25

For the same reason that the screens break very very easy - money, they want you to buy a new one.

Turn off the news and read. Watch Psywar, learn something important about our society and PR, why and how it got started and how it brainwashes you.
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November 12, 2014, 01:48:17 AM
 #26

I think today's smartphone technology such as anti-theft technology has to be installed on the smartphone, it is a sort of competition of the smartphone manufacturers, with the technology it is expected that the theft of smartphones in the world will decline, hopefully this is a sign of progress that will continue to be updated ...  Roll Eyes

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November 12, 2014, 02:44:28 AM
 #27

WTF this is ridiculous. I would say this is likely some kind of vulnerability at the phone level, not the tower level, so in theory phones could be jailbroken to disable this ability (or google/apple could start using better morals and prevent this from happening at the hardware and/or OS level).

On somewhat of a side-note I would think this would be overturned via the supreme court as your phone's location is not public information and is very different from "metadata" that has generally been held that people do not have a reasonable expectation of keeping private. Not only that but if the phone was in airplane mode then it would be even more clear that the defendant did not want his location disclosed.

Not a vulnerability but an intentional creation.
The government mandates the GPS function on your cell phone so that they can track you in just this manner.  

http://www.informationweek.com/mobile/mobile-devices/gps-mandatory-on-mobile-phones-by-2018/d/d-id/1100561?

To modernize the 911 system, the FCC has ruled that all wireless carriers must offer GPS; VoIP services also.
In an effort to modernize the 911 system, the Federal Communications Commission issued a rule Sept. 27 that will mandate that all U.S. carriers include GPS in their phones by 2018. That includes VoIP services as well. The goal is to allow emergency workers to find your position when you dial 911, similar to the way they can when you call via landlines.

It just goes to show even ideas with good intentions have consequences.

Details on the conviction
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-08-14/marijuana-runner-had-no-phone-gps-privacy-right-court-says-1-.html

“If a tool used to transport contraband gives off a signal that can be tracked for location, certainly the police can track the signal,” U.S Circuit Judge John M. Rogers wrote. “The law cannot be that a criminal is entitled to rely on the expected untrackability of his tools.”

In a fragmented ruling addressing the affixing of a GPS device to a suspect’s car without a warrant, the high court majority said police in many cases will need a warrant to track suspects using those means.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia faulted the police for encroaching upon “a protected area.”

“No such physical intrusion occurred in Skinner’s case,” Rogers and Clay said in their ruling today.

Dissenting in part, U.S. Circuit Judge Bernice Donald said the discovery of Skinner’s location by using a mobile phone constituted a search as defined by the U.S. Constitution, requiring federal agents to obtain a warrant or explain why they should be granted an exception.

Donald concurred in Skinner’s ultimate conviction on other grounds.

“We do not mean to suggest there was no reasonable expectation of privacy because Skinner’s phone was used in the commission of a crime,” Rogers and Clay said in a footnote to their opinion. “On the contrary, an innocent actor would similarly lack a reasonable expectation of privacy in the inherent external locatability of a tool that he or she bought.”

The case is U.S. v. Skinner. 09-6497, U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit (Cincinnati).

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awesome31312
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November 12, 2014, 06:22:55 AM
 #28

That's true. The government holds all the necessary technology to hunt you through your phone. Even when the SIM is removed.

Thanks, Google!

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November 12, 2014, 08:11:52 AM
 #29

That's true. The government holds all the necessary technology to hunt you through your phone. Even when the SIM is removed.

Thanks, Google!

Well there was also the thread about ISIS and Iphones with the whole gay issue.
That said either phone company has tracking software, but at least with Android you can jailbreak and probably truly disable it if you can find the right software for the job.
awesome31312
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November 12, 2014, 09:55:12 AM
 #30

That's true. The government holds all the necessary technology to hunt you through your phone. Even when the SIM is removed.

Thanks, Google!

Well there was also the thread about ISIS and Iphones with the whole gay issue.
That said either phone company has tracking software, but at least with Android you can jailbreak and probably truly disable it if you can find the right software for the job.

Using bloatware to reduce bloatware makes no sense

Why not just manually uninstall all the crap that Samsung puts in their phones?

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dontCAREhair
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November 13, 2014, 07:54:31 AM
 #31

That's true. The government holds all the necessary technology to hunt you through your phone. Even when the SIM is removed.

Thanks, Google!
This is not necessarily true. It is possible to use a prepaid phone and/or edit the raw information in your phone to disguise your "phones" true "identity"
awesome31312
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November 14, 2014, 09:00:49 AM
 #32

That's true. The government holds all the necessary technology to hunt you through your phone. Even when the SIM is removed.

Thanks, Google!
This is not necessarily true. It is possible to use a prepaid phone and/or edit the raw information in your phone to disguise your "phones" true "identity"

Only on Android devices with root access enabled

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November 15, 2014, 02:56:04 PM
 #33

That's true. The government holds all the necessary technology to hunt you through your phone. Even when the SIM is removed.

Thanks, Google!
This is not necessarily true. It is possible to use a prepaid phone and/or edit the raw information in your phone to disguise your "phones" true "identity"

It is true that government can track any mobile phone without exceptions. If they really want find someone's phone they will find it. They can even spy on turned off electronic devices...


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November 15, 2014, 07:13:12 PM
 #34

They can even spy on turned off electronic devices...

Stop exaggerating the powers of the government

If the phone is turned off and the battery is removed, there is no way for them to track a device unless they planted a GPS chip in it beforehand.

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November 16, 2014, 03:30:57 AM
 #35

They can even spy on turned off electronic devices...

Stop exaggerating the powers of the government

If the phone is turned off and the battery is removed, there is no way for them to track a device unless they planted a GPS chip in it beforehand.
You are taking his statement too literally. His full quote is below:
It is true that government can track any mobile phone without exceptions. If they really want find someone's phone they will find it. They can even spy on turned off electronic devices...
He is saying that even if you have your phone in the "off" mode then the government is able to trick your phone into stealthy turn itself on and broadcast it's location. The same is true for when a phone is in airplane mode.

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