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Author Topic: Revealed: Elon Musk's Plan to Build a Space Internet  (Read 569 times)
Wilikon
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January 17, 2015, 04:04:47 PM
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Because he doesn't have enough going on, Elon Musk—he of Tesla Motors, SpaceX, SolarCity, and the Hyperloop—is launching another project. Musk wants to build a second Internet in space and one day use it to connect people on Mars to the Web.

Musk is tonight hosting a SpaceX event in Seattle, where the company is opening a new office. The talk will mostly be about SpaceX’s plans for hiring aerospace and software engineers in the Pacific Northwest to boost the company’s rocket-building efforts. But he'll also use the talk to announce his newest idea, which would launch a vast network of communication satellites to orbit earth. The network would do two things: speed up the general flow of data on the Internet and deliver high-speed, low-cost Internet services to the three billion-plus people who still have poor access to the Web. “Our focus is on creating a global communications system that would be larger than anything that has been talked about to date,” Musk told Bloomberg Businessweek ahead of the announcement.

The Space Internet venture, to which Musk hasn’t yet given a name, would be hugely ambitious. Hundreds of satellites would orbit about 750 miles above earth, much closer than traditional communications satellites in geosynchronous orbit at altitudes of up to 22,000 miles. The lower satellites would make for a speedier Internet service, with less distance for electromagnetic signals to travel. The lag in current satellite systems makes applications such as Skype, online gaming, and other cloud-based services tough to use. Musk’s service would, in theory, rival fiber optic cables on land while also making the Internet available to remote and poor regions that don’t have access.

In Musk’s vision, Internet data packets going from, say, Los Angeles to Johannesburg would no longer have to go through dozens of routers and terrestrial networks. Instead, the packets would go to space, bouncing from satellite to satellite until they reach the one nearest their destination, then return to an antenna on earth. “The speed of light is 40 percent faster in the vacuum of space than it is for fiber,” Musk says. “The long-term potential is to be the primary means of long-distance Internet traffic and to serve people in sparsely populated areas.”

This project, he says, will be based in the Seattle office. (Musk has yet to determine the location of the satellite factory.) The office will start with about 60 people and may grow to 1,000 within three to four years. The employees will also work on SpaceX’s Falcon rockets, Dragon capsules, and additional vehicles to carry various supplies (and soon, people) into space. “We want the best engineers that either live in Seattle or that want to move to the Seattle area and work on electronics, software, structures, and power systems,” Musk says. “We want top engineering talent of all kinds.”

Earlier this week, the entrepreneur Greg Wyler announced a similar effort through a startup called OneWeb. Wyler has spent the last 15 years trying to bring Internet access to the so-called “other three billion.” He started a telecommunications company in Rwanda that set up Africa’s first 3G cell network. Later, he founded a company called O3b, which owns a satellite network that delivers fast, cheap Internet to hard-to-reach places along the equator. Through OneWeb, Wyler looks to expand this vision and fill the skies with hundreds of satellites that will beam their signals down to low-cost, solar-powered rooftop antennas.

OneWeb has announced that Qualcomm and the Virgin Group will invest in its effort, which is expected to cost around $2 billion. Wyler has also already secured the spectrum needed to deliver such a service from space and expects to be up and running by 2018. He has a team of more than 30 engineers developing the satellites, antennas, and software for OneWeb.

Musk and Wyler have known each other for years. Musk, in fact, used to crash at Wyler’s guest house in Atherton, Calif. While there are major similarities between the two ventures, Musk says he’ll have an edge through SpaceX’s smarts and manufacturing techniques. “Greg and I have a fundamental disagreement about the architecture,” Musk says. “We want a satellite that is an order of magnitude more sophisticated than what Greg wants. I think there should be two competing systems.”



http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2015-01-17/elon-musk-and-spacex-plan-a-space-internet



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Pro-Choice internet...


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January 17, 2015, 08:01:41 PM
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Lol this guy just doesn't stop Roll Eyes
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January 19, 2015, 06:19:28 AM
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Nothing but great things come from Elon Musk.

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January 19, 2015, 10:01:05 AM
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In Musk’s vision, Internet data packets going from, say, Los Angeles to Johannesburg would no longer have to go through dozens of routers and terrestrial networks. Instead, the packets would go to space, bouncing from satellite to satellite until they reach the one nearest their destination, then return to an antenna on earth. “The speed of light is 40 percent faster in the vacuum of space than it is for fiber,” Musk says. “The long-term potential is to be the primary means of long-distance Internet traffic and to serve people in sparsely populated areas.”


How the packet will "reach the one nearest their destination" without routing?
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January 19, 2015, 10:09:17 AM
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In Musk’s vision, Internet data packets going from, say, Los Angeles to Johannesburg would no longer have to go through dozens of routers and terrestrial networks. Instead, the packets would go to space, bouncing from satellite to satellite until they reach the one nearest their destination, then return to an antenna on earth. “The speed of light is 40 percent faster in the vacuum of space than it is for fiber,” Musk says. “The long-term potential is to be the primary means of long-distance Internet traffic and to serve people in sparsely populated areas.”


How the packet will "reach the one nearest their destination" without routing?

Without routing on terrestial ground. Though a bit of ground based routing is needed to get your packet into space and back again. It will be very vulnerable when the satelites are targeted or fail, the beauty of the internet is it decentralised routing system..

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January 19, 2015, 10:12:18 AM
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It's nice to have dreams and goals
Society will benefit from faster internet access someday in the future and heck if it makes the ride from Earth to Mars more bearable because someday the foundations of space internet will have already been in place I'm all for it.
Best case scenario I'm damn old and get to see it in action myself Grin

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January 19, 2015, 10:52:55 AM
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Without routing on terrestial ground. Though a bit of ground based routing is needed to get your packet into space and back again. It will be very vulnerable when the satelites are targeted or fail, the beauty of the internet is it decentralised routing system..

They still need some sort of routing between the satellites to find out where to send the packet. It's possible to use switching instead of routing but that would be a bit chatty. ...or they have to develop something new. Anyway as you said this solution going to lose (at least in the beginning) some of the most important features of Internet: decentralized routing, redundant network paths.
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January 20, 2015, 05:32:47 AM
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And now Google is rumored to be investing $1 Billion in the project.
http://gizmodo.com/report-googles-finalizing-a-1-billion-investment-in-s-1680500143

This can go huge. Google has been previously active for such an idea with its own 'balloons' to provide WiFi access to the world.
This satellite approach might just work.

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January 20, 2015, 08:54:05 AM
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Musk is a tech messiah, one of the gifted few who see the tremendous need for a vision of human progress transcending the limits this arbitrary Universe set upon us.

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