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Author Topic: The Great SIM Heist -- latest Snowden leak  (Read 1356 times)
Chef Ramsay
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February 20, 2015, 10:00:01 PM
 #1

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AMERICAN AND BRITISH spies hacked into the internal computer network of the largest manufacturer of SIM cards in the world, stealing encryption keys used to protect the privacy of cellphone communications across the globe, according to top-secret documents provided to The Intercept by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The hack was perpetrated by a joint unit consisting of operatives from the NSA and its British counterpart Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ. The breach, detailed in a secret 2010 GCHQ document, gave the surveillance agencies the potential to secretly monitor a large portion of the world’s cellular communications, including both voice and data.

The company targeted by the intelligence agencies, Gemalto, is a multinational firm incorporated in the Netherlands that makes the chips used in mobile phones and next-generation credit cards. Among its clients are AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint and some 450 wireless network providers around the world. The company operates in 85 countries and has more than 40 manufacturing facilities. One of its three global headquarters is in Austin, Texas and it has a large factory in Pennsylvania.

In all, Gemalto produces some 2 billion SIM cards a year. Its motto is “Security to be Free.”

With these stolen encryption keys, intelligence agencies can monitor mobile communications without seeking or receiving approval from telecom companies and foreign governments. Possessing the keys also sidesteps the need to get a warrant or a wiretap, while leaving no trace on the wireless provider’s network that the communications were intercepted. Bulk key theft additionally enables the intelligence agencies to unlock any previously encrypted communications they had already intercepted, but did not yet have the ability to decrypt.


More...https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/02/19/great-sim-heist/
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BitMos
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"PLEASE SCULPT YOUR SHIT BEFORE THROWING. Thank U"


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February 20, 2015, 10:29:27 PM
 #2

https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=961896.0

money is faster...
ajareselde
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Satoshi is rolling in his grave. #bitcoin


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February 20, 2015, 10:33:49 PM
 #3

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AMERICAN AND BRITISH spies hacked into the internal computer network of the largest manufacturer of SIM cards in the world, stealing encryption keys used to protect the privacy of cellphone communications across the globe, according to top-secret documents provided to The Intercept by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The hack was perpetrated by a joint unit consisting of operatives from the NSA and its British counterpart Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ. The breach, detailed in a secret 2010 GCHQ document, gave the surveillance agencies the potential to secretly monitor a large portion of the world’s cellular communications, including both voice and data.

The company targeted by the intelligence agencies, Gemalto, is a multinational firm incorporated in the Netherlands that makes the chips used in mobile phones and next-generation credit cards. Among its clients are AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint and some 450 wireless network providers around the world. The company operates in 85 countries and has more than 40 manufacturing facilities. One of its three global headquarters is in Austin, Texas and it has a large factory in Pennsylvania.

In all, Gemalto produces some 2 billion SIM cards a year. Its motto is “Security to be Free.”

With these stolen encryption keys, intelligence agencies can monitor mobile communications without seeking or receiving approval from telecom companies and foreign governments. Possessing the keys also sidesteps the need to get a warrant or a wiretap, while leaving no trace on the wireless provider’s network that the communications were intercepted. Bulk key theft additionally enables the intelligence agencies to unlock any previously encrypted communications they had already intercepted, but did not yet have the ability to decrypt.


More...https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/02/19/great-sim-heist/


I was quite impressed with their work with hard drives compromised in similar fashion in recent news, and now this one.. well they sure know their game.
Its typical for US to act untouchable by any other laws but their own, and to reach out and take whatever they want without giving it a second thought about basic human rights and privacy.
I was going to ask; what will happen now, but i realised that is a dumb question, because nothing will happen, they wont be charged, they wont be trialed, and they will continue to whatevery they want, and that is our freedom.

cheers

BitMos
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February 20, 2015, 10:36:27 PM
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AMERICAN AND BRITISH spies hacked into the internal computer network of the largest manufacturer of SIM cards in the world, stealing encryption keys used to protect the privacy of cellphone communications across the globe, according to top-secret documents provided to The Intercept by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The hack was perpetrated by a joint unit consisting of operatives from the NSA and its British counterpart Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ. The breach, detailed in a secret 2010 GCHQ document, gave the surveillance agencies the potential to secretly monitor a large portion of the world’s cellular communications, including both voice and data.

The company targeted by the intelligence agencies, Gemalto, is a multinational firm incorporated in the Netherlands that makes the chips used in mobile phones and next-generation credit cards. Among its clients are AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint and some 450 wireless network providers around the world. The company operates in 85 countries and has more than 40 manufacturing facilities. One of its three global headquarters is in Austin, Texas and it has a large factory in Pennsylvania.

In all, Gemalto produces some 2 billion SIM cards a year. Its motto is “Security to be Free.”

With these stolen encryption keys, intelligence agencies can monitor mobile communications without seeking or receiving approval from telecom companies and foreign governments. Possessing the keys also sidesteps the need to get a warrant or a wiretap, while leaving no trace on the wireless provider’s network that the communications were intercepted. Bulk key theft additionally enables the intelligence agencies to unlock any previously encrypted communications they had already intercepted, but did not yet have the ability to decrypt.


More...https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/02/19/great-sim-heist/


I was quite impressed with their work with hard drives compromised in similar fashion in recent news, and now this one.. well they sure know their game.
Its typical for US to act untouchable by any other laws but their own, and to reach out and take whatever they want without giving it a second thought about basic human rights and privacy.
I was going to ask; what will happen now, but i realised that is a dumb question, because nothing will happen, they wont be charged, they wont be trialed, and they will continue to whatevery they want, and that is our freedom.

cheers

your daughters, wife, loved ones, gf...

cheers

money is faster...
sickhouse
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February 20, 2015, 11:35:43 PM
 #5

Not surprised. Any way to protect myself? I don't trust the app SMSsecure or w/e it's called.

Turn off the news and read. Watch Psywar, learn something important about our society and PR, why and how it got started and how it brainwashes you.
ajareselde
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Satoshi is rolling in his grave. #bitcoin


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February 21, 2015, 01:05:23 AM
 #6

Quote
AMERICAN AND BRITISH spies hacked into the internal computer network of the largest manufacturer of SIM cards in the world, stealing encryption keys used to protect the privacy of cellphone communications across the globe, according to top-secret documents provided to The Intercept by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The hack was perpetrated by a joint unit consisting of operatives from the NSA and its British counterpart Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ. The breach, detailed in a secret 2010 GCHQ document, gave the surveillance agencies the potential to secretly monitor a large portion of the world’s cellular communications, including both voice and data.

The company targeted by the intelligence agencies, Gemalto, is a multinational firm incorporated in the Netherlands that makes the chips used in mobile phones and next-generation credit cards. Among its clients are AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint and some 450 wireless network providers around the world. The company operates in 85 countries and has more than 40 manufacturing facilities. One of its three global headquarters is in Austin, Texas and it has a large factory in Pennsylvania.

In all, Gemalto produces some 2 billion SIM cards a year. Its motto is “Security to be Free.”

With these stolen encryption keys, intelligence agencies can monitor mobile communications without seeking or receiving approval from telecom companies and foreign governments. Possessing the keys also sidesteps the need to get a warrant or a wiretap, while leaving no trace on the wireless provider’s network that the communications were intercepted. Bulk key theft additionally enables the intelligence agencies to unlock any previously encrypted communications they had already intercepted, but did not yet have the ability to decrypt.


More...https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/02/19/great-sim-heist/


I was quite impressed with their work with hard drives compromised in similar fashion in recent news, and now this one.. well they sure know their game.
Its typical for US to act untouchable by any other laws but their own, and to reach out and take whatever they want without giving it a second thought about basic human rights and privacy.
I was going to ask; what will happen now, but i realised that is a dumb question, because nothing will happen, they wont be charged, they wont be trialed, and they will continue to whatevery they want, and that is our freedom.

cheers

your daughters, wife, loved ones, gf...

cheers

lol, i was thinking more in a financial interest, not domestic. if they take my family, they would return them the next day because theres just so much that one can handle, even if they are worlds most powerfull :]
control of information has become most profitable enterprise, but if that wasnt the case, and if we were to be in slave era once more, i doubt they would restrain themselves from that also..

cheers

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