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Author Topic: What to do with a few bitcoins  (Read 1575 times)
stepkrav
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August 02, 2012, 07:41:25 AM
 #21

not interested in donations or charities, but thank you all.
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DryPowder
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August 02, 2012, 04:18:00 PM
 #22

Invest you coins in mining more coins

Keep Your Powder Dry
Sherkel
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August 02, 2012, 11:09:27 PM
 #23

Invest you coins in mining more coins
At least from what I've seen, you need thousands of dollars in capital to even hope to profit from mining within a few months.

What do you get when you cross dominoes and The Matrix?
<A dominatrix!>
peasant
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August 03, 2012, 12:02:36 AM
 #24

The way it's starting to rise in value i'd hold on to them for a little bit.
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August 03, 2012, 12:19:01 AM
 #25

https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=137.0

Order as many pizzas as you can.

Ƀ ⇢ 1MmEUyo8NAifNN3avQtrFDjPQzhPMMgB36
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August 03, 2012, 03:44:07 AM
 #26

I just invested my first complete bitcoin in Hashkings lending. Now i can gain 1.9% weekly and hopefully the value keeps rising. Can't beat that if you want to be lazy.
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August 03, 2012, 12:49:39 PM
 #27

for example you can play lotto at www.btclottery.net Wink

I like bitcoin Wink
OneEyed
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August 03, 2012, 01:08:06 PM
 #28

Please remember that day-trading is negative-sum; that is, excluding the exchange, on average people lose.

If bitcoins are considered a currency, I'm not sure this is true, as the system isn't a closed one. Some people will daytrade while others will exchange only in one direction (compared to trading dividendless shares, where the only thing you can do after buying a share is sell it back). Everyone may win, and everyone may lose (except the exchanges, which always win).

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August 03, 2012, 04:32:47 PM
 #29

Please remember that day-trading is negative-sum; that is, excluding the exchange, on average people lose.

If bitcoins are considered a currency, I'm not sure this is true, as the system isn't a closed one. Some people will daytrade while others will exchange only in one direction (compared to trading dividendless shares, where the only thing you can do after buying a share is sell it back). Everyone may win, and everyone may lose (except the exchanges, which always win).
If the one-direction traders are included, it is definitely negative-sum. The speculators can only win if the one-direction traders lose.
OneEyed
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August 03, 2012, 06:46:49 PM
 #30

Please remember that day-trading is negative-sum; that is, excluding the exchange, on average people lose.

If bitcoins are considered a currency, I'm not sure this is true, as the system isn't a closed one. Some people will daytrade while others will exchange only in one direction (compared to trading dividendless shares, where the only thing you can do after buying a share is sell it back). Everyone may win, and everyone may lose (except the exchanges, which always win).
If the one-direction traders are included, it is definitely negative-sum. The speculators can only win if the one-direction traders lose.

Why? Let's assume I have € and I want to buy something in $ because it is cheaper (quite a common scenario, when hardware vendors tend to sell something at $99.99 in the US and 99.99€ in Europe, when 1€ = $1.3), even when I include the currency exchange fees.

In the end, I may be very happy and have made a good deal by having exchanged my € for $, while the person doing the reverse transaction may be happy because he made a good deal in selling his $ for € at a better rate than in bought the $ initially. This is a win-win, both for me and for the speculator.

Why is that so? Because the hardware vendor is not included in the loop, he does not explicitely use an exchange. He will use the $ to pay his employees in the US, and the € to pay his employees in Europe. He may convert some $ to € or some € to $, but that would be small fraction of what he earns.

dree12
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August 03, 2012, 06:54:21 PM
 #31

Please remember that day-trading is negative-sum; that is, excluding the exchange, on average people lose.

If bitcoins are considered a currency, I'm not sure this is true, as the system isn't a closed one. Some people will daytrade while others will exchange only in one direction (compared to trading dividendless shares, where the only thing you can do after buying a share is sell it back). Everyone may win, and everyone may lose (except the exchanges, which always win).
If the one-direction traders are included, it is definitely negative-sum. The speculators can only win if the one-direction traders lose.

Why? Let's assume I have € and I want to buy something in $ because it is cheaper (quite a common scenario, when hardware vendors tend to sell something at $99.99 in the US and 99.99€ in Europe, when 1€ = $1.3), even when I include the currency exchange fees.

In the end, I may be very happy and have made a good deal by having exchanged my € for $, while the person doing the reverse transaction may be happy because he made a good deal in selling his $ for € at a better rate than in bought the $ initially. This is a win-win, both for me and for the speculator.

Why is that so? Because the hardware vendor is not included in the loop, he does not explicitely use an exchange. He will use the $ to pay his employees in the US, and the € to pay his employees in Europe. He may convert some $ to € or some € to $, but that would be small fraction of what he earns.
Okay, so I guess I failed to include the relative utility of different currencies to different people. In that case, trading may not be negative sum. So effectively, one is trading currency at a premium because one currency is worth more to him than others.

In that case, you're right: trading is not necessarily negative-sum.
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August 03, 2012, 07:31:58 PM
 #32

Let's assume I have € and I want to buy something in $ because it is cheaper (quite a common scenario, when hardware vendors tend to sell something at $99.99 in the US and 99.99€ in Europe, when 1€ = $1.3), even when I include the currency exchange fees.

Well and that will solve itself soon enough as EUR will be at parity with USD or even below (already 1€ = $1.2 seems more accurate)
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