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Author Topic: 2013-04-02 Business Insider "Bitcoin ATM Founder: We Already Have Orders From...  (Read 2510 times)
mccorvic
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April 02, 2013, 01:44:58 PM
 #1

http://www.businessinsider.com/cyprus-bitcoin-atm-guy-responds-2013-4


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April 02, 2013, 01:56:22 PM
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Berwick will appear on CNBC at 11:35 am today.

*Grabs popcorn
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April 02, 2013, 01:58:56 PM
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As much as I want this story to be true with huge numbers of orders for BTC ATMs put me down in the skeptical category. Please prove me wrong Mr. Berwick.

Free money, buy bitcoins!
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April 02, 2013, 02:37:25 PM
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That mock-up really puts into perspective how powerful an ATM would be, because I had the preconceived (and misguided) notion of how an ATM is supposed to work with fiat money. This is not an ATM in the traditional sense. It is a currency exchange and a payment center, and I don't even need an account to use it. It's a Western Union and PayPal killer.

I could walk up to a terminal, scan your QR code from my phone, and deposit my cash as BTC to your address. And, of course, I could deposit one currency to myself, cross a border, and withdraw it as another currency at my destination.

"The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary."
-- H.L. Mencken (1918)
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April 02, 2013, 02:39:10 PM
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That mock-up really puts into perspective how powerful an ATM would be, because I had the preconceived (and misguided) notion of how an ATM is supposed to work with fiat money. This is not an ATM in the traditional sense. It is a currency exchange and a payment center, and I don't even need an account to use it. It's a Western Union and PayPal killer.

I could walk up to a terminal, scan your QR code from my phone, and deposit my cash as BTC to your address. And, of course, I could deposit one currency to myself, cross a border, and withdraw it as another currency at my destination.

This, exactly. Put one of these machines in every other corner, and Western Union, Paypal and a whole bunch of other existing business will soon find themselves out of a job.

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April 02, 2013, 02:42:00 PM
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I could walk up to a terminal, scan your QR code from my phone, and deposit my cash as BTC to your address. And, of course, I could deposit one currency to myself, cross a border, and withdraw it as another currency at my destination.

This is a delicious idea.

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April 02, 2013, 03:00:14 PM
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The elephant in the room here is that the FinCEN ruling is pretty clear that the operator of a machine like this would require a money transmitter licence, which would in turn mean KYC compliance.  In reality if you walked up to this machine it would say "Please enter your username and password". The only way you could get an account would be by sending off all your identification documents for verification. The patriot act killed this invention before it was even born.  Please tell me I'm wrong, I so want to be wrong.
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April 02, 2013, 03:04:58 PM
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The elephant in the room here is that the FinCEN ruling is pretty clear that the operator of a machine like this would require a money transmitter licence, which would in turn mean KYC compliance.  In reality if you walked up to this machine it would say "Please enter your username and password". The only way you could get an account would be by sending off all your identification documents for verification. The patriot act killed this invention before it was even born.  Please tell me I'm wrong, I so want to be wrong.
It is a problem only for you americans  Cheesy
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April 02, 2013, 03:09:22 PM
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The elephant in the room here is that the FinCEN ruling is pretty clear that the operator of a machine like this would require a money transmitter licence, which would in turn mean KYC compliance.  In reality if you walked up to this machine it would say "Please enter your username and password". The only way you could get an account would be by sending off all your identification documents for verification. The patriot act killed this invention before it was even born.  Please tell me I'm wrong, I so want to be wrong.
In the US? Sure... in anywhere else in the world whatever the  FinCen says is as valid as me signing a check for U$S 1,000,000 Tongue

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April 02, 2013, 03:13:40 PM
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The company operating the machines is american, and required to know its customers wherever they may reside.

As the treasury secretary said when Nixon took America off the gold standard:
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"It may be our currency, but it's your problem."
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April 02, 2013, 03:29:12 PM
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The elephant in the room here is that the FinCEN ruling is pretty clear that the operator of a machine like this would require a money transmitter licence, which would in turn mean KYC compliance.  In reality if you walked up to this machine it would say "Please enter your username and password". The only way you could get an account would be by sending off all your identification documents for verification. The patriot act killed this invention before it was even born.  Please tell me I'm wrong, I so want to be wrong.
It is a problem only for you americans  Cheesy

I'm thinking it's more of a problem for anyone using a machine located in the US.

Would there be a VAT, or some other reason to obtain identities, in the EuroZone?

Dankedan: price seems low, time to sell I think...
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April 02, 2013, 03:32:06 PM
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Probably yes, our laws aren't so different from usa 
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April 02, 2013, 03:34:35 PM
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The elephant in the room here is that the FinCEN ruling is pretty clear that the operator of a machine like this would require a money transmitter licence, which would in turn mean KYC compliance.  In reality if you walked up to this machine it would say "Please enter your username and password". The only way you could get an account would be by sending off all your identification documents for verification. The patriot act killed this invention before it was even born.  Please tell me I'm wrong, I so want to be wrong.
In the US? Sure... in anywhere else in the world whatever the  FinCen says is as valid as me signing a check for U$S 1,000,000 Tongue

Understand that while FinCEN ruling don't apply just about any first world country has very similar KYC type laws.  It is only a matter of time before they release similar (maybe not exactly word for word) guidance on how those laws applies to "virtual currencies".  FinCEN (US) moved first but they won't be the last.  I mean Russia is moving to ban cash tx larger than $10,000.  You honestly think the same regulators looking to ban high value cash tx will somehow not realize that Bitcoin is a giant "loophole".  Now governments have very little chance of regulating "Bitcoin proper" but they can have influence at the edge.

So a company looking to spend tens of millions of dollars building out a network has to worry not just what the laws are "today" but what the laws likely are going to be in the next 5-10 years and if you think 10 years from now (assuming BTC money supply is in the tens of billions of USD equivalent) that no other country in the world is going to provide "guidance" similar to FinCEN well you are just living in a fantasy land where governments don't stifle innovation everyday.

Note the idea is still powerful but anytime you are at the edge of fiat & crypto worlds it is going mean dealing with financial regulation.
deathcode
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April 02, 2013, 03:35:35 PM
 #14

The company operating the machines is american, and required to know its customers wherever they may reside.

As the treasury secretary said when Nixon took America off the gold standard:
Quote
"It may be our currency, but it's your problem."

The company is american? well that depends on where is registered. I'd never register my company in the US... too many regulations.

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April 02, 2013, 03:39:55 PM
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The elephant in the room here is that the FinCEN ruling is pretty clear that the operator of a machine like this would require a money transmitter licence, which would in turn mean KYC compliance.  In reality if you walked up to this machine it would say "Please enter your username and password". The only way you could get an account would be by sending off all your identification documents for verification. The patriot act killed this invention before it was even born.  Please tell me I'm wrong, I so want to be wrong.
In the US? Sure... in anywhere else in the world whatever the  FinCen says is as valid as me signing a check for U$S 1,000,000 Tongue

Understand that while FinCEN ruling don't apply just about any first world country has very similar KYC type laws.  It is only a matter of time before they release similar (maybe not exactly word for word) guidance on how those laws applies to "virtual currencies".  FinCEN (US) moved first but they won't be the last.  I mean Russia is moving to ban cash tx larger than $10,000.  You honestly think the same regulators looking to ban high value cash tx will somehow not realize that Bitcoin is a giant "loophole".  Now governments have very little chance of regulating "Bitcoin proper" but they can have influence at the edge.

So a company looking to spend tens of millions of dollars building out a network has to worry not just what the laws are "today" but what the laws likely are going to be in the next 5-10 years and if you think 10 years from now (assuming BTC money supply is in the tens of billions of USD equivalent) that no other country in the world is going to provide "guidance" similar to FinCEN well you are just living in a fantasy land where governments don't stifle innovation everyday.

Note the idea is still powerful but anytime you are at the edge of fiat & crypto worlds it is going mean dealing with financial regulation.


Fantasy land uh? companies are moved from country to country every day to avoid regulations. You're dealing with one of the most difficult to track currencies in the world if not the most difficult.
Trust me, I lived in third world countries. I know countries that they don't even have clear regulations for pirating software, or for breaking into someone's email, or other rules that are common rules already in the US or other developed countries and you think they will regulate a "brand new" crypto-currency?
I think you are the one living in a fantasy land...

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April 02, 2013, 03:41:34 PM
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The company is american? well that depends on where is registered. I'd never register my company in the US... too many regulations.

Yes, this could be the solution. Jeff needs to incorporate offshore and smoke all these clowns. </pipedream>
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April 02, 2013, 03:56:18 PM
 #17


The company is american? well that depends on where is registered. I'd never register my company in the US... too many regulations.

Yes, this could be the solution. Jeff needs to incorporate offshore and smoke all these clowns. </pipedream>

Which does solve the problem.  The location of the ATM is what matters.  If it violates local law it is going to get seized.  It is going to require local employees to service it, contracts with armored car companies to deal with the cash, and local banks, etc.
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April 02, 2013, 03:58:09 PM
 #18

... just about any first world country has ...

third world countries

Well last time I checked the company in the OP wasn't look to build ATM network in Zimbabwe or Somalia.  So your point was?
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April 02, 2013, 04:00:56 PM
 #19

Great idea, but to the government, this looks like an Automated Money Laundering Machine (AMLM?) The issue is that someone could engage in an illegal economic activity, deposit the cash in the machine, and send the BTC to anyone, anywhere. There's got to be a human in the loop, which I assume is how Western Union does it, in order to take AML information.
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April 02, 2013, 04:01:18 PM
 #20

So if you're in Cyprus, you walk up to the machine and get BTC or Euros/USD/Drachmas out of it.

If you're in the US, you walk up to the machine, type in your username and password, then get BTC or Euros/USD/Drachmas out of it.

Not entirely unlike when you want to use Paypal, Western Union or any of the others.

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