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Author Topic: MIT Technology Review: Cryptocurrency - (Sept/October Issue)  (Read 940 times)
elux
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September 07, 2011, 04:21:52 PM
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TL;DR: "The bitcoin, a virtual medium of exchange, could be a real alternative to government-issued money—but only if it survives hoarding by speculators."


Read the article here: http://www.technologyreview.com/computing/38392/

Quote
When the virtual currency bitcoin was released, in January 2009, it appeared to be an interesting way for people to trade among themselves in a secure, low-cost, and private fashion. The Bitcoin network, designed by an unknown programmer with the handle "Satoshi ­Nakamoto," used a decentralized peer-to-peer system to verify transactions, which meant that people could exchange goods and services electronically, and anonymously, without having to rely on third parties like banks. Its medium of exchange, the bitcoin, was an invented currency that people could earn—or, in Bitcoin's jargon, "mine"—by lending their computers' resources to service the needs of the Bitcoin network. Once in existence, bitcoins could also be bought and sold for dollars or other currencies on online exchanges. The network seemed like a potentially useful supplement to existing monetary systems: it let people avoid the fees banks charge and take part in noncash transactions anonymously while still guaranteeing that transactions would be secure.

Yet over the past year and a half Bitcoin has become, for some, much more. Instead of a supplement to the dollar economy, it's been trumpeted as a competitor, and promoters have conjured visions of markets where bitcoins are a dominant medium of exchange. The hyperbole is out of proportion with the more mundane reality. Tens of thousands of bitcoins are traded each day (some for goods and services, others in exchange for other currencies), and several hundred businesses, mostly in the digital world, now take bitcoins as payment. That's good for a new monetary system, but it's not disruptive growth. Still, the excitement is perhaps predictable. Setting aside Bitcoin's cool factor—it might just as well have leapt off the pages of Neal ­Stephenson's cult science-fiction novel Snow Crash—a peer-to-peer electronic currency uncontrolled by central bankers or politicians is a perfect object for the anxieties and enthusiasms of those frightened by the threats of inflation and currency debasement, concerned about state power and the surveillance state, and fascinated with the possibilities created by distributed, decentralized systems.

Bitcoin is not going to make government-backed currencies obsolete. But while the system's virtues, such as anonymity and the lack of bank fees, may not matter much to most consumers, one can envision it being useful in a variety of niche markets (some legal, others not, like recreational drugs). Where anonymity is valuable, where trusted third parties are hard to find or charge high rates, and where persistently high inflation is a problem, it's possible that bitcoins could in fact flourish as an alternative currency.

(...)

So just now the bitcoin boom of the past year looks not so much like the birth of a new currency as like a classic bubble. And this has created a real paradox for bitcoin enthusiasts. The best thing for bitcoins would be for people to stop thinking of them as an investment and start thinking of them as a currency. That probably requires the bubble to burst, as it may be doing right now. But if the bubble bursts, it's possible that people's interest in Bitcoin will just fade away. After all, would you accept bitcoins in exchange for your work or products if you knew their value had fallen 50 percent in a matter of days? The challenge for Bitcoin now is whether, having become popular because of the cycle of hype, it can somehow avoid being devoured by it. Only then might we be able to say, Good-bye, asset; hello, currency.



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nmat
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September 07, 2011, 04:24:37 PM
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That's two weeks old... It was already posted here somewhere.
elux
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September 07, 2011, 05:02:18 PM
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I'm aware of that.

Still, MIT Technology Review is a bit of a heavyweight.

Bottom line is they are giving Bitcoin the thumbs up,
when Bitcoin has been going through a rough patch.

I think people ought to know.  Cool
cypherdoc
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September 07, 2011, 06:38:11 PM
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hoarding as a problem is such a stupid argument.  of course something will be hoarded until it is allowed to reach its fundamental value.  if the price is suppressed via manipulation then the hoarding will continue.  when Bitcoin reaches its fundamental value which i think will be well north of $10000 per BTC, then investors will consider disgorging their BTC.  its really quite simple.
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September 07, 2011, 08:22:34 PM
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Bitcoin market price is in stable decline, and it means that people selling bitcoins on regular basis. Therefore I think that possibility of massive hoarding is not on the table any more.
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September 07, 2011, 08:40:16 PM
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https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=38892.0
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