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Author Topic: Why Don't Black People Use Bitcoins?  (Read 9966 times)
BitcoinPorn
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September 12, 2011, 09:18:19 PM
 #41

Historically for much of the time voting was not restricted to whites or males, just to landowners. It just so happened that almost all the landowners were white males.

A Bitcoin economy would be the same: The people with power would be the early adopters (that's us! woo!), who are overwhelmingly white and male.

Breaking down your post in the nicest way possible so you can continue to troll hard.    According to this information, the voting was not a "racist" thing intently, it just was that way because "almost all the landowners" were white males.    I think it is safe to say in this example from history, to be a landowner, you had to be white, yes?   So basically the whole voting thing was a sham, right?

So now you are saying that the Bitcoin economy would be the same?  So you are saying that it was only white people who had the opportunity to make Bitcoin?   Also, Japanese/Satoshi = "White" to you I guess?  (going by the classic definition of they aren't race 'x' or 'y' then I must label them as white?) Or are you saying because not enough non-white people were there to invent Bitcoin, that they have to be like a bad movie and force "one of every race" just to meet your weird diversity requirements?   BASICALLY WE MUST CHANGE THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE.    We don't need more black people to use Bitcoins, we need more black people to invent Bitcoins?

You trolled good, this thread makes no sense.

I await the same version of this thread but involving women not using Bitcoins, it is sadly a little more progressive to at least discuss that as a joke.

Quote
It's kindof predictable though: such decrying tactics are typical responses from those who are yet to confront their own privileges. They are simple deflections, to avoid and delegitimise awkward questions about equality and race...
Pot, kettle, etc.  Says the guy who seems to have stopped taking questions on the topic he started.  Lots of questions, no answers, you seemed to have stopped the topic and instead we are being Meta about the thread itself and it's users, weeeeeee.

Please, who or what defines a person as White?

Who or what defines a person as black?

This simple clarification in the original post might change a lot Smiley

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ClownCoins
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September 12, 2011, 09:21:05 PM
 #42

Bill Cosby is black.

ClownCoins are just like Bitcoins except when they arrive they make a huge bang and then the wheels fall off. Oh, wait...
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September 12, 2011, 09:33:05 PM
 #43

Hey, I'm black and I like bitcoin.  I live in Iowa so I've never really been in touch with the urban culture, but I think the problem is just education.  Public schooling is a terrible socialist idea that has done a lot of damage to the education level of a lot of kids in the cities.  Theres a reason our founding fathers like Thomas Jefferson were so opposed to government schooling.

Bitcoin can be a tough concept to understand when you are used to cash and haven't really been taught about economics.  I'm glad I was homeschooled instead, I went to public school for a few months and it was one of the worst things that ever happened to me.

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September 12, 2011, 09:34:27 PM
 #44

you people have no idea what trolling is, do you? As soon as I actually stopped trolling on this forum, I am accused of it with every post. sigh.

I mean, I make a thread about literally printing the blockchain in a series of books and nobody bats an eye.  But you make one thread discussing the wider societal implications of the success of bitcoin... and suddenly everyone is crying out because of the nasty troll. Get a clue.

It's kindof predictable though: such decrying tactics are typical responses from those who are yet to confront their own privileges. They are simple deflections, to avoid and delegitimise awkward questions about equality and race...

Here here! +1
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September 12, 2011, 09:36:23 PM
 #45

Hey, I'm black and I like bitcoin.  I live in Iowa so I've never really been in touch with the urban culture, but I think the problem is just education.  Public schooling is a terrible socialist idea that has done a lot of damage to the education level of a lot of kids in the cities.  Theres a reason our founding fathers like Thomas Jefferson were so opposed to government schooling.

Bitcoin can be a tough concept to understand when you are used to cash and haven't really been taught about economics.  I'm glad I was homeschooled instead, I went to public school for a few months and it was one of the worst things that ever happened to me.
More subtle next time please, this is no fun at all. Maybe a new account too, as this one generally hasn’t been subtle.

You don’t really sound like the libertarians here, you’ll also have to try to speak more pretentiously.

"Bitcoin had been transformed from an anarachistic challenge to the financial status quo, to the crypto spawn of Satan, fuelled by cut-throat greed and delusions of avarice." - MatTheCat
"these people don't seem to want to stop till Bitcoin is completely destroyed and left like an old cum rag in the corner of the room." - ShroomsKit
BitcoinPorn
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September 12, 2011, 09:37:15 PM
 #46

"I am not going to call you a white man, and I am going to ask you to not call me a Black man, instead you're Mike Wallace and I am Morgan Freeman" -Morgan Freeman
He is a God among men (and women lol).

I finally went ahead and checked Surawit post's history https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=40354;sa=showPosts

I am earnestly sorry I fucked up your trolling, I will try and stay out of your threads, but try harder next time, and have your back up arrive quicker.

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September 12, 2011, 09:45:15 PM
 #47

More subtle next time please, this is no fun at all.
Yeah, I agree, there are some gullible idiots on this forum (imagine that? it's almost as if bitcoin attracts them somehow)... But a black Iowan? Please.

BitcoinPorn, your powers of observation amaze me to no end. I have indeed been ignoring your posts after telling you to fuck off. This is entirely intentional; you have demonstrated your racism clear enough, and I do not wish to derail this topic arguing against that. Furthermore it seems foolish to argue about matters such as equality and ethics with a pornographer... Oh, sorry, I'm the one trolling.

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September 12, 2011, 09:48:47 PM
 #48

Hey, I'm black and I like bitcoin.  I live in Iowa so I've never really been in touch with the urban culture, but I think the problem is just education.  Public schooling is a terrible socialist idea that has done a lot of damage to the education level of a lot of kids in the cities.  Theres a reason our founding fathers like Thomas Jefferson were so opposed to government schooling.

Bitcoin can be a tough concept to understand when you are used to cash and haven't really been taught about economics.  I'm glad I was homeschooled instead, I went to public school for a few months and it was one of the worst things that ever happened to me.
Haha, why do all the black people I meet end up being so awesome?
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September 12, 2011, 09:51:02 PM
 #49

White man came, polluted and enslaved the planet.  Cry

Now white man has the opportunity to clean up the mess.  Cool

https://localbitcoins.com/?ch=80k | BTC: 1LJvmd1iLi199eY7EVKtNQRW3LqZi8ZmmB
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September 12, 2011, 09:51:17 PM
 #50

Quote from: Immanuel Go
So, no, my thinking is not flawed. The poor do carry money. Why they are considered poor and live in conditions one would consider poverty is another thread for another time.

I want you to write this thread on poverty and how it does/doesn't align with your whole "fairness of the free market" ideals so badly.
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September 12, 2011, 09:51:46 PM
 #51

White man came, polluted and enslaved the planet.  Cry

Now white man has the opportunity to clean up the mess.  Cool

White man gonna pollute harder
BitcoinPorn
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September 12, 2011, 09:51:57 PM
 #52

BitcoinPorn, your powers of observation amaze me to no end. I have indeed been ignoring your posts after telling you to fuck off. This is entirely intentional; you have demonstrated your racism clear enough, and I do not wish to derail this topic arguing against that. Furthermore it seems foolish to argue about matters such as equality and ethics with a pornographer... Oh, sorry, I'm the one trolling.
Dude I know.  Classic trolling too (again, I admit I bit in my very first reply to the thread, I am not in denial on that), you continue to ignore the topic you created and instead continue to ignore my posts unless it makes your trolling easier, "good times" Smiley

But yeah, try again with another topic unless you can troll your way into making this into a real discussion backed by reality and not your view of whatever it is you consider a 'black' person (which again, you haven't clarified, but again, I'm talking as though trolls discuss things lol)

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September 12, 2011, 09:52:25 PM
 #53

Hey, I'm black and I like bitcoin.  I live in Iowa so I've never really been in touch with the urban culture, but I think the problem is just education.  Public schooling is a terrible socialist idea that has done a lot of damage to the education level of a lot of kids in the cities.  Theres a reason our founding fathers like Thomas Jefferson were so opposed to government schooling.

Bitcoin can be a tough concept to understand when you are used to cash and haven't really been taught about economics.  I'm glad I was homeschooled instead, I went to public school for a few months and it was one of the worst things that ever happened to me.
Haha, why do all the black people I meet end up being so awesome?

The awesomeness percentage of black people is equal with that of white people, you must just have good luck. 

And yes, there are some black people in Iowa guys, jeeze.  Like 3% of the population!  My dad is from Asheville, North Carolina originally but moved out here to go to school.

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September 12, 2011, 09:54:28 PM
 #54

Quote from: Immanuel Go
So, no, my thinking is not flawed. The poor do carry money. Why they are considered poor and live in conditions one would consider poverty is another thread for another time.

I want you to write this thread on poverty and how it does/doesn't align with your whole "fairness of the free market" ideals so badly.
I'll give it to you simply: My lineage from my parents upward is poor farmers, military veterans, construction workers and inevitably slaves of the Spanish Empire. After meeting my great-grandmother who raised 16 children out of a tin shack, I can say from a first-hand perspective that a good majority of the world's supposedly impoverished are the happiest people on the planet.
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September 12, 2011, 10:00:01 PM
 #55

Quote from: Immanuel Go
So, no, my thinking is not flawed. The poor do carry money. Why they are considered poor and live in conditions one would consider poverty is another thread for another time.

I want you to write this thread on poverty and how it does/doesn't align with your whole "fairness of the free market" ideals so badly.
I'll give it to you simply: My lineage from my parents upward is poor farmers, military veterans, construction workers and inevitably slaves of the Spanish Empire. After meeting my great-grandmother who raised 16 children out of a tin shack, I can say from a first-hand perspective that a good majority of the world's impoverished are the happiest people on the planet.

I meant something along the lines of why you believe poverty exists, not whether you believe they are already happy with their lot (or lack thereof?) in life.
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September 12, 2011, 10:04:28 PM
 #56

Quote from: Immanuel Go
So, no, my thinking is not flawed. The poor do carry money. Why they are considered poor and live in conditions one would consider poverty is another thread for another time.

I want you to write this thread on poverty and how it does/doesn't align with your whole "fairness of the free market" ideals so badly.
I'll give it to you simply: My lineage from my parents upward is poor farmers, military veterans, construction workers and inevitably slaves of the Spanish Empire. After meeting my great-grandmother who raised 16 children out of a tin shack, I can say from a first-hand perspective that a good majority of the world's impoverished are the happiest people on the planet.

I meant something along the lines of why you believe poverty exists, not whether you believe they are already happy with their lot (or lack thereof?) in life.
That's the thing: I don't believe it truly exists. I believe there are times when a society is held hostage or when a culture is destroyed by dependency ( I guess you could consider this true poverty) and other means but otherwise I see poverty (as it is called) as the default human condition. We are all born with nothing but our hands and feet to sustain. It's only a matter of who stops us from sustaining when it comes down to surviving.
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September 12, 2011, 10:13:01 PM
 #57

Quote from: Immanuel Go
So, no, my thinking is not flawed. The poor do carry money. Why they are considered poor and live in conditions one would consider poverty is another thread for another time.

I want you to write this thread on poverty and how it does/doesn't align with your whole "fairness of the free market" ideals so badly.
I'll give it to you simply: My lineage from my parents upward is poor farmers, military veterans, construction workers and inevitably slaves of the Spanish Empire. After meeting my great-grandmother who raised 16 children out of a tin shack, I can say from a first-hand perspective that a good majority of the world's impoverished are the happiest people on the planet.

I meant something along the lines of why you believe poverty exists, not whether you believe they are already happy with their lot (or lack thereof?) in life.
That's the thing: I don't believe it truly exists. I believe there are times when a society is held hostage or when a culture is destroyed by dependency ( I guess you could consider this true poverty) and other means but otherwise I see poverty (as it is called) as the default human condition. We are all born with nothing but our hands and feet to sustain. It's only a matter of who stops us from sustaining when it comes down to surviving.

I was born with only my hands and feet to sustain me, but I was also born to relatively well-off parents who could feed me and provide me with more than adequate shelter and luxuries (toys, television, computer access) up until and even past when I got my first job at 13, where I definitely didn't make enough money to support myself. So, is my default just different?

When I speak of poverty, I speak of the lack of resources for survival (food, shelter, clean water). Are you saying that everyone is born without these resources, and by their own labor gets them?
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September 12, 2011, 10:15:19 PM
 #58

Quote from: Immanuel Go
So, no, my thinking is not flawed. The poor do carry money. Why they are considered poor and live in conditions one would consider poverty is another thread for another time.

I want you to write this thread on poverty and how it does/doesn't align with your whole "fairness of the free market" ideals so badly.
I'll give it to you simply: My lineage from my parents upward is poor farmers, military veterans, construction workers and inevitably slaves of the Spanish Empire. After meeting my great-grandmother who raised 16 children out of a tin shack, I can say from a first-hand perspective that a good majority of the world's impoverished are the happiest people on the planet.

I meant something along the lines of why you believe poverty exists, not whether you believe they are already happy with their lot (or lack thereof?) in life.
That's the thing: I don't believe it truly exists. I believe there are times when a society is held hostage or when a culture is destroyed by dependency ( I guess you could consider this true poverty) and other means but otherwise I see poverty (as it is called) as the default human condition. We are all born with nothing but our hands and feet to sustain. It's only a matter of who stops us from sustaining when it comes down to surviving.

Obviously you've never heard of trust fund babies?
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September 12, 2011, 10:20:54 PM
 #59

I'm "black" and I use bitcoin and I had a good laugh reading some of the posts on this thread.

Anonymous
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September 12, 2011, 10:23:06 PM
 #60

Quote from: Immanuel Go
So, no, my thinking is not flawed. The poor do carry money. Why they are considered poor and live in conditions one would consider poverty is another thread for another time.

I want you to write this thread on poverty and how it does/doesn't align with your whole "fairness of the free market" ideals so badly.
I'll give it to you simply: My lineage from my parents upward is poor farmers, military veterans, construction workers and inevitably slaves of the Spanish Empire. After meeting my great-grandmother who raised 16 children out of a tin shack, I can say from a first-hand perspective that a good majority of the world's impoverished are the happiest people on the planet.

I meant something along the lines of why you believe poverty exists, not whether you believe they are already happy with their lot (or lack thereof?) in life.
That's the thing: I don't believe it truly exists. I believe there are times when a society is held hostage or when a culture is destroyed by dependency ( I guess you could consider this true poverty) and other means but otherwise I see poverty (as it is called) as the default human condition. We are all born with nothing but our hands and feet to sustain. It's only a matter of who stops us from sustaining when it comes down to surviving.

I was born with only my hands and feet to sustain me, but I was also born to relatively well-off parents who could feed me and provide me with more than adequate shelter and luxuries (toys, television, computer access) up until and even past when I got my first job at 13, where I definitely didn't make enough money to support myself. So, is my default just different?

When I speak of poverty, I speak of the lack of resources for survival (food, shelter, clean water). Are you saying that everyone is born without these resources, and by their own labor gets them?

I believe a parent provides to a child by the child's own inherent value. It's unfortunate to say that some have a child while not being prepared to care for them and return the value they are worth.

However, I believe there is little reason not to be able sustain yourself once you are of age, even if you were raised in poverty. You may not be able to support yourself on your wage if building codes are restrictive of lower-end homes and if your local economy is heavily restricted overall, but otherwise we are all able to put food and water in our mouthes and a roof over our heads. My parents worked their way up to upper-middle class jobs with little issue from their trailer park homes and low-income families. It was harder but c'est la vie.

Anyways, your default was better than a lot of others but isn't very relevant in the end. We all experience life's journeys differently.
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