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Author Topic: Facilities with $0.02/kWh in Seattle or Washington State  (Read 6892 times)
antirack
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March 09, 2014, 08:46:49 AM
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Can somebody please enlighten me how companies in Washington, or specifically in Seattle, are only paying $0.02/kWh for electricity?

Or is that just the unit of kWh, without demand charges etc?

Does this also scale, say 1MW, 2MW, 5MW etc?
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Sophokles
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March 09, 2014, 12:23:07 PM
 #2

Can somebody please enlighten me how companies in Washington, or specifically in Seattle, are only paying $0.02/kWh for electricity?

Or is that just the unit of kWh, without demand charges etc?

Does this also scale, say 1MW, 2MW, 5MW etc?


where did you get this price quote from?
antirack
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March 09, 2014, 01:34:43 PM
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This is from various threads here on the forum, and also what an asic hoster in Seattle says (they have a thread here).
antirack
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March 10, 2014, 05:31:13 AM
 #4

http://www.eia.gov/state/print.cfm?sid=WA

Nov-13

Electricity    Washington
Residential    8.70 cents/kWh    
Commercial    7.95 cents/kWh
Industrial    4.49 cents/kWh    

Still no clue where to find the $0.02/kWh that has been mentioned here so many times.
cowandtea
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March 10, 2014, 04:52:26 PM
 #5

no such thing, more like a private power plant..

spazzdla
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March 10, 2014, 07:54:49 PM
 #6

Can somebody please enlighten me how companies in Washington, or specifically in Seattle, are only paying $0.02/kWh for electricity?

Or is that just the unit of kWh, without demand charges etc?

Does this also scale, say 1MW, 2MW, 5MW etc?


Scale?  What do you mean...?

Watts = Voltage * Current

1MW.. is a lot of power..  746watts = 1 horse power. 
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March 11, 2014, 07:10:46 AM
 #7

You researched out by Wenatchee?

Kluge
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March 11, 2014, 07:41:51 AM
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Can somebody please enlighten me how companies in Washington, or specifically in Seattle, are only paying $0.02/kWh for electricity?

Or is that just the unit of kWh, without demand charges etc?

Does this also scale, say 1MW, 2MW, 5MW etc?


Scale?  What do you mean...?
Depending on the electricity provider, they'll often effectively have either progressive or regressive pricing schemes based on how much you use, though they'll sometimes (not always) also offer flat-rate pricing for heavy users. Most companies give a near-useless "base cost" number, or "number to compare," which doesn't factor in taxes, "volume restrictions," cancellation fees, "minimum use" charges, and a whole host of other stuff you can't fit into a cute, single number. When asking if it scales, it's asking if the price for a KWh after, say, 1MWh is consumed, will cost the same or near as a KWh after, say, 50KWh is consumed.

Best way I've found for finding best electricity price is to look up a map of electricity providers for the state (in the US), seeing who claims what territory, then looking them up one-by one and reading through their god-awful "fee schedule books." Some will have a fixed rate which can only be changed annually or some other scheme designed by government bureaucrats, some change each billing cycle, some have "real-time" rates based on nonsense, some charge you based on the time of day you're using your electricity.... some will charge you less if you're old (not kidding) but tack weird restrictions.... this is ignoring the "sign-on bonus" market which exists in some states, which is a whole other clusterfuck of legal nonsense and manipulative advertising (though maybe beneficial if you play it right).
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March 11, 2014, 07:43:22 AM
 #9

buy a chp... get long term natural gas contract... add cooling to chp you should get to around 5cent per kwh incl. cooling..
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March 11, 2014, 04:57:38 PM
 #10

in Washington state checkout central Washington I pay 0.027 cent a kw and we also have 100x100 for 60 bucks a month checkout Chelan County Douglas County and grant county we have tons of data centers and cheap power also megabigpower has a few places over here Good Ole Central Washington
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March 11, 2014, 06:27:04 PM
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0.02, no way. maybe possible under special situation which has government subside.
httpcore
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March 11, 2014, 11:41:22 PM
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You can get around 3.5 per kw after fees in central washington but thats about as low as it gets...

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March 14, 2014, 07:56:54 AM
 #13

The Grand Coulee Dam in Washington is the largest hydroelectric power producer in the United States. Most commercial/industrial rates range anywhere from .049 to .06 kWh. Gotta love Washington...we have the highest minimum wage being $9.32 and some of the cheapest power.
loewen.brad
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March 14, 2014, 10:57:04 AM
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The majority of power in WA comes from hydroelectric sources, which makes electricity EXTREMELY cheap to produce. I'm sure if you look at non-peak hours, you can get your power costs down pretty low. But, I'm fairly certain that $0.02/kWh is a bulk rate given to large corporations (i.e. Microsoft, Boeing, etc...) who buy their power in massive quantities and therefore are able to get deeply discounted prices from the power companies that supply them. If you're not a large corporation that's buying power at a rate of 100 megawatts or more per day (which would be enough to power a small city), you're not going to get that kind of rate.

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mohawk38
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March 16, 2014, 07:23:12 AM
 #15

Look here at Grant County rates:
 
http://www.grantpud.org/customer-service/payments-billing/rates-and-fees
 
specifically, 'Large General Service Rate 7 '.
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April 29, 2014, 05:16:31 AM
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Hamsters, they use a legion of hamsters!!

Honorcoin | 100% PoS HCeeVqxQo4d8kbWX869B6AECRcWGs1cAJL
googlemaster1
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May 02, 2014, 11:55:53 PM
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The Grand Coulee Dam in Washington is the largest hydroelectric power producer in the United States. Most commercial/industrial rates range anywhere from .049 to .06 kWh. Gotta love Washington...we have the highest minimum wage being $9.32 and some of the cheapest power.

Don't forget about Chief Joseph Dam!!!  2nd largest, and its right down stream!

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Tomintx
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May 07, 2014, 04:04:51 AM
 #18

Look here at Grant County rates:
 
http://www.grantpud.org/customer-service/payments-billing/rates-and-fees
 
specifically, 'Large General Service Rate 7 '.
200kW minimum load is a bunch of Bitcoin miners.

200kW * 24 * 30 * $0.021 = $3024 / month minimum

You better be mining on a huge scale!
bitcoin4eva
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May 07, 2014, 11:42:31 AM
 #19

3k/month for electricity? Wow... You should be getting atleast 5k/month from mining BTC in order to get into profit. Remember to take the cost of miners into account too.
jamesc760
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May 07, 2014, 11:06:50 PM
 #20

@kluge, "designed by government bureaucrats"

If it weren't for those gov't bureaucrats, you would be paying outrageous utility bills.
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