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Author Topic: Satoshi Nakamoto: The Next 24 Hours  (Read 8015 times)
legolouman
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January 13, 2012, 11:40:56 PM
 #21

I'd say Satoshi Nakamoto is a pseudonym for something. Maybe a Thomas Nakamoto (I didn't decrypt that), or even something entirely different or unrelated. If he really cared about anonymity and cryptography, there would be some really elaborate scheme. I'm a firm believer that he is an active member of the community.

I believe that's he's active on this forum as well. In the mean time, give me a direction to whittle down this list, even if it's a dead end.


That is a tough one. Generally, I don't think that the generalization you made of 'mathematics' was the way to go. Computer science would give the traits for cryptography and programming needed, but a true understanding of the cryptography may only come from mathematics. Maybe broadening your search while narrowing it is the way to go (makes sense, eh?)

I think
major- computer science
minor- mathematics, cryptography (if possible) or something.

It might just be some extreme genius with no formal training though. You can learn programming by yourself, but cryptography is a bit harder. IMO he had to have come from a 'big' school MIT or international equiv. Or no school at all.

I also wouldn't want to knock the Japanese reference. Or the idea that this is all a crypt for us to decode.

Doing a search on that site only brings up dissertations that have the keyword in it. "Commuter Science" only generates the following 29 graduates: (do any of these names look familiar?)

Quote
Almstrum, Vicki   University of Texas at Austin   1994
Arch, John   University of Oregon   1983
Asperti, Andrea   Università di Pisa   1989
Burr, Michael   New York University   2010
Dai, Jack   Iowa State University   2001
Dixon, Gayle   Columbia University   2001
Frias, Marcelo   Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro   1998
Goodness, Jeanne   Vanderbilt University   1990
Gottlob, Georg   Technische Universität Wien   1981
Greer, James   University of Texas at Austin   1987
Guzo, Andrew   Columbia University   1989
Hajebi, Mojgan   Oregon State University   2001
Hasle, Per   Aarhus University   1989
Hernandez Martinez, Paul   University of Leeds   2006
Hidvegi, Zoltan   University of Texas at Austin   2007
Hirsch, Michael   University of California, Berkeley   1990
Kao, Gio   University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign   2008
Kurz, Alexander   Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München   2000
Lemin, Vladimir   The Pennsylvania State University   2002
O'Lander, Richard   Columbia University   1994
Olson, David   University of Oregon   1986
Priebe, Roger   University of Texas at Austin   1997
Pulliam, Sylvia   Vanderbilt University   1992
Salisbury, Mark   University of Oregon   1986
Schuster, Daniel   University of Texas at Austin   1996
Shao, Yilei   Princeton University   2007
Wei, Wan-Di   University of Nebraska-Lincoln   1996
Xiang, Gang   University of Texas at El Paso   2007
Yasuhara, Ken   University of Washington   2007


Commuter Science or Computer Science?

If you love me, you'd give me a Satoshi!
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January 14, 2012, 12:02:26 AM
 #22

I'd say Satoshi Nakamoto is a pseudonym for something. Maybe a Thomas Nakamoto (I didn't decrypt that), or even something entirely different or unrelated. If he really cared about anonymity and cryptography, there would be some really elaborate scheme. I'm a firm believer that he is an active member of the community.

I believe that's he's active on this forum as well. In the mean time, give me a direction to whittle down this list, even if it's a dead end.


That is a tough one. Generally, I don't think that the generalization you made of 'mathematics' was the way to go. Computer science would give the traits for cryptography and programming needed, but a true understanding of the cryptography may only come from mathematics. Maybe broadening your search while narrowing it is the way to go (makes sense, eh?)

I think
major- computer science
minor- mathematics, cryptography (if possible) or something.

It might just be some extreme genius with no formal training though. You can learn programming by yourself, but cryptography is a bit harder. IMO he had to have come from a 'big' school MIT or international equiv. Or no school at all.

I also wouldn't want to knock the Japanese reference. Or the idea that this is all a crypt for us to decode.

Doing a search on that site only brings up dissertations that have the keyword in it. "Commuter Science" only generates the following 29 graduates: (do any of these names look familiar?)

Quote
Almstrum, Vicki   University of Texas at Austin   1994
Arch, John   University of Oregon   1983
Asperti, Andrea   Università di Pisa   1989
Burr, Michael   New York University   2010
Dai, Jack   Iowa State University   2001
Dixon, Gayle   Columbia University   2001
Frias, Marcelo   Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro   1998
Goodness, Jeanne   Vanderbilt University   1990
Gottlob, Georg   Technische Universität Wien   1981
Greer, James   University of Texas at Austin   1987
Guzo, Andrew   Columbia University   1989
Hajebi, Mojgan   Oregon State University   2001
Hasle, Per   Aarhus University   1989
Hernandez Martinez, Paul   University of Leeds   2006
Hidvegi, Zoltan   University of Texas at Austin   2007
Hirsch, Michael   University of California, Berkeley   1990
Kao, Gio   University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign   2008
Kurz, Alexander   Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München   2000
Lemin, Vladimir   The Pennsylvania State University   2002
O'Lander, Richard   Columbia University   1994
Olson, David   University of Oregon   1986
Priebe, Roger   University of Texas at Austin   1997
Pulliam, Sylvia   Vanderbilt University   1992
Salisbury, Mark   University of Oregon   1986
Schuster, Daniel   University of Texas at Austin   1996
Shao, Yilei   Princeton University   2007
Wei, Wan-Di   University of Nebraska-Lincoln   1996
Xiang, Gang   University of Texas at El Paso   2007
Yasuhara, Ken   University of Washington   2007


Commuter Science or Computer Science?

For a second there, I though I screwed up. The list is of computer science dissertations. I only spelled it incorrectly once.
legolouman
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January 14, 2012, 12:10:51 AM
 #23

I'd say Satoshi Nakamoto is a pseudonym for something. Maybe a Thomas Nakamoto (I didn't decrypt that), or even something entirely different or unrelated. If he really cared about anonymity and cryptography, there would be some really elaborate scheme. I'm a firm believer that he is an active member of the community.

I believe that's he's active on this forum as well. In the mean time, give me a direction to whittle down this list, even if it's a dead end.


That is a tough one. Generally, I don't think that the generalization you made of 'mathematics' was the way to go. Computer science would give the traits for cryptography and programming needed, but a true understanding of the cryptography may only come from mathematics. Maybe broadening your search while narrowing it is the way to go (makes sense, eh?)

I think
major- computer science
minor- mathematics, cryptography (if possible) or something.

It might just be some extreme genius with no formal training though. You can learn programming by yourself, but cryptography is a bit harder. IMO he had to have come from a 'big' school MIT or international equiv. Or no school at all.

I also wouldn't want to knock the Japanese reference. Or the idea that this is all a crypt for us to decode.

Doing a search on that site only brings up dissertations that have the keyword in it. "Commuter Science" only generates the following 29 graduates: (do any of these names look familiar?)

Quote
Almstrum, Vicki   University of Texas at Austin   1994
Arch, John   University of Oregon   1983
Asperti, Andrea   Università di Pisa   1989
Burr, Michael   New York University   2010
Dai, Jack   Iowa State University   2001
Dixon, Gayle   Columbia University   2001
Frias, Marcelo   Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro   1998
Goodness, Jeanne   Vanderbilt University   1990
Gottlob, Georg   Technische Universität Wien   1981
Greer, James   University of Texas at Austin   1987
Guzo, Andrew   Columbia University   1989
Hajebi, Mojgan   Oregon State University   2001
Hasle, Per   Aarhus University   1989
Hernandez Martinez, Paul   University of Leeds   2006
Hidvegi, Zoltan   University of Texas at Austin   2007
Hirsch, Michael   University of California, Berkeley   1990
Kao, Gio   University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign   2008
Kurz, Alexander   Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München   2000
Lemin, Vladimir   The Pennsylvania State University   2002
O'Lander, Richard   Columbia University   1994
Olson, David   University of Oregon   1986
Priebe, Roger   University of Texas at Austin   1997
Pulliam, Sylvia   Vanderbilt University   1992
Salisbury, Mark   University of Oregon   1986
Schuster, Daniel   University of Texas at Austin   1996
Shao, Yilei   Princeton University   2007
Wei, Wan-Di   University of Nebraska-Lincoln   1996
Xiang, Gang   University of Texas at El Paso   2007
Yasuhara, Ken   University of Washington   2007


Commuter Science or Computer Science?

For a second there, I though I screwed up. The list is of computer science dissertations. I only spelled it incorrectly once.


Ahhh... Well if it is anyone on the list, which I doubt, I'd have to pick one of the individuals that graduated in 2006 or later. Much earlier wouldn't make too much sense to me.

If you love me, you'd give me a Satoshi!
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January 14, 2012, 01:31:02 AM
 #24

I predict you will be assassinated before that 24 hours is up if you're correct. 8D

More likely Satoshi will be assassinated and/or picked up by g-men. I suspect that is why he has not surfaced in so long.

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January 14, 2012, 04:49:05 AM
 #25

What are the chances that Satoshi Nakamoto wrote a dissertation? And if you think he did, what keyword would be in the title of his dissertation?
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January 14, 2012, 05:07:57 AM
 #26

What are the chances that Satoshi Nakamoto wrote a dissertation? And if you think he did, what keyword would be in the title of his dissertation?
Game theory: Extracting wealth from a globally-distributed crypto-ponzi?

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January 14, 2012, 05:27:50 AM
 #27

http://www.yatedo.fr/p/Kurt+Huang/famous/0e8eef658b0257fb6ed449cc8678a8aa

Quote
Kurt Huang is co-founder, president, and chief product officer of BitPass. He has a Computer Science degree from Harvard and an MD from Stanford. Named to the 2004 list of the world's 100 Top Young Innovators by MIT's Technology Review magazine.

Haibo Huang: http://genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu/id.php?id=123114

or http://repositories.lib.utexas.edu/bitstream/handle/2152/2444/huangd92682.pdf?sequence=2

Dissertation: Essays in Electronic Money and Banking (2005)

Quote
Abstract:

This paper provides insight on how a modern system of private electronic money would work and how the necessary network shall function. We present a model with two types of private electronic currencies with one being local, and the other being global. Both of them display transactional advantages and dominate fiat money in rate of return. However, in spite of these different returns, the two electronic currencies and fiat money circulate in equilibrium. We further observe that the local electronic currency can be sold with a premium or with a discount, depending on several factors including the probability of relocation faced by the agents in this economy. The higher the probability of relocation, the higher is this discount, and the lower the share of the local electronic currency in the young creditors’ portfolio.

Quote
In this paper, we focus our attention  on some particular aspects of the micropayment system, i.e.: the Internet payments system for the micro-products market. As of today, we do observe three different niches in this market. In the first niche, the sellers are packaging their micro-products in the form of subscriptions, thus increasing the value of individual transactions, so  that electronic equivalents of fiat money can be used as media of exchange. In the second niche, we find micro-payment companies playing the role of intermediaries between sellers and buyers; they operate in very different ways. For example, BitPass requires consumers to open and transfer money to an account; the credit card fee is hence only charged to this single transaction of funding the account; as consumers with accounts buy micro-products, merchants need to pay 15% of the value of each transaction to the Micropayment intermediaries, i.e. BitPass in our example.

Maybe all a dead end, but it'll get you a thinkin'!

http://www.giiresearch.com/report/mag210198-solving-micropayments-problem-minimizing-impact.html

Quote
Companies mentioned in this report include: Amazon, Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, Apple, PaymentOne, Zong, eBay, Microsoft, Facebook, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, PayPal, Starbucks, Google, Napster, Rhapsody, Netflix, DigiCash, CyberCash, ESPN, Playboy, First Virtual Holdings, Beenz, Flooz, IBM, Compaq, Digital Equipment Corporation, Peppercoin, Chockstone, BitPass, Clickandbuy, Zynga, OMGPOP, Boku, Electronic Arts, Aeria Games, Playdom, Zoosk, Flattr, Square, Twitter, BitCoin, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Mazooma, and Dwolla.

I just uploaded pdf and KeyNote versions of the talk I gave at the CIA last Tuesday:
 https://s3.amazonaws.com/gavinandresen-bitcoin/GavinAndresenCIATalk.pdf
 https://s3.amazonaws.com/gavinandresen-bitcoin/GavinAndresen_Bitcoin.key

I took questions in the middle, before I dove into the technical details. I was asked about whether or not I thought price instability would be a problem ("yes, I'll talk about that later") and how/why I got involved.

Later, at the panel discussion, I was asked a question that showed I need to do a better job of distinguishing bitcoin addresses and IP addresses. And I was asked if there were moral issues, since bitcoin can be used by criminals ("I'm working on bitcoin because I think the potential benefits to the world are much, much greater than the costs.")

The other speakers were from PayPal, Facebook Payments, M-Pesa, Heartland Payment Systems, and the Federal Reserve, so it was worth going just for the connections. Bitcoin is definitely the new kid on the block, and I presented it as such; not "bitcoin will take over the world" but "bitcoin is a very interesting experiment that could be world-changing if it works out."

And now... there is plenty of work to be done, so I'm going to stop reminiscing about the good old days last week....

Heartland Payment Systems purchased Chockstone which purchased Peppercoin.
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January 14, 2012, 06:21:05 AM
 #28

Feels like watching Sherlok Holmes 3... Go go Phinnaeus Gage...

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January 14, 2012, 07:06:31 AM
 #29

Feels like watching Sherlok Holmes 3... Go go Phinnaeus Gage...

NO! Really! Jacob Goldstein is truly Tom Williams!  Grin

I wonder how much I can bribe theymos to have him ban me from this forum.  Wink
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January 14, 2012, 07:15:05 PM
 #30

I though Shatoshi was his real name?
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January 14, 2012, 07:25:32 PM
 #31

Whoever he is, that guy outsmarted us all big time.

Having 1.5 MILLION BTC I find it hard to believe he is not the next digital Bernie !

It actually makes perfect sense. Control the biggest exchange so he can slowly cash out without us idiots noticing ?

Can anyone actually check how much coins he has and if they are spent etc. ?
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January 14, 2012, 07:35:29 PM
 #32

Whoever he is, that guy outsmarted us all big time.

Having 1.5 MILLION BTC I find it hard to believe he is not the next digital Bernie !

It actually makes perfect sense. Control the biggest exchange so he can slowly cash out without us idiots noticing ?

Can anyone actually check how much coins he has and if they are spent etc. ?

If, and only if satoshi owns fox, he wouldnt scam us. Bitcoin is his child, he wants it to succeed as a currency.

If you love me, you'd give me a Satoshi!
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January 16, 2012, 07:34:05 AM
 #33

Satoshi is clearly from the future and returned after starting BTC to cash out his eleventy billion coins into quatloos. Or it's Gavin + everybody else in early BTC dev
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January 19, 2012, 05:29:37 AM
 #34

My personal (almost completely unresearched) theory is that the purpose of bitcoin was actually stuff like silk road and money laundering. Basically organized crime got fed up with bailing out the banks so they made a cryptocurrency finally happen. Maybe the yakuza put in the most funding or something. I dunno.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/global/2009/dec/13/drug-money-banks-saved-un-cfief-claims
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January 23, 2012, 02:45:53 PM
 #35

Why are people so obsessed in revealing Satoshi?
He obviously chose to stay anonymous, I respect that. If he chooses to come out at Bitcoin's fifth anniversary, great!
There are good reasons to not have him public, think Assange. There is more on the news about the things he is accused of than about wikileaks..

Its a team of people anyway, Satoshi doesnt exist.

Ente
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January 23, 2012, 03:14:36 PM
 #36

Why are people so obsessed in revealing Satoshi?
He obviously chose to stay anonymous, I respect that. If he chooses to come out at Bitcoin's fifth anniversary, great!
There are good reasons to not have him public, think Assange. There is more on the news about the things he is accused of than about wikileaks..

Its a team of people anyway, Satoshi doesnt exist.

Ente

Quote
Why are people so obsessed in revealing Satoshi?

I can answer that in four words: Human Nature.

The same could be asked as to why people need to prove that Jesus exist, when all he supposedly did was good for the human race.

That said, a team of us are very close to solving this mystery. We've already successfully linked Freddie Mercury to Pavlov's Dog:

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March 30, 2012, 06:15:44 AM
 #37

My personal (almost completely unresearched) theory is that the purpose of bitcoin was actually stuff like silk road and money laundering. Basically organized crime got fed up with bailing out the banks so they made a cryptocurrency finally happen. Maybe the yakuza put in the most funding or something. I dunno.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/global/2009/dec/13/drug-money-banks-saved-un-cfief-claims

The real purpose of Bitcoin: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=73666.0
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April 03, 2012, 01:22:09 AM
 #38

I believe I may have bumped into Satoshi Nakamoto in real life one day in the late 90's or early '00s.

we had a conversation while waiting in line.  It was about computers, fixing the money system and a few other things that I forget now.  Wish I knew where i put that business card.

Set up the same thing..
http://bit.ly/btcrefs
Get more bitcoins.
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April 03, 2012, 01:34:27 AM
 #39

I believe I may have bumped into Satoshi Nakamoto in real life one day in the late 90's or early '00s.

we had a conversation while waiting in line.  It was about computers, fixing the money system and a few other things that I forget now.  Wish I knew where i put that business card.

I'll offer a 1 Satoshi bounty if you find that business card. Somebody please quote me, thereby locking this offer in stone.

~Bruno~
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April 03, 2012, 01:35:33 AM
 #40

I believe I may have bumped into Satoshi Nakamoto in real life one day in the late 90's or early '00s.

we had a conversation while waiting in line.  It was about computers, fixing the money system and a few other things that I forget now.  Wish I knew where i put that business card.

I'll offer a 1 Satoshi bounty if you find that business card. Somebody please quote me, thereby locking this offer in stone.

~Bruno~


Count me in for 1 satoshi, also.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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