Bitcoin Forum
December 11, 2016, 04:36:40 AM *
News: To be able to use the next phase of the beta forum software, please ensure that your email address is correct/functional.
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2 [3]  All
  Print  
Author Topic: Comcast DNS Now Fails on Bitcoinica?  (Read 10276 times)
cypherdoc
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1764



View Profile
January 23, 2012, 06:33:18 PM
 #41

wow so this is why bitcoinica hasnt been loading for me!   Shocked

just installed openDNS screw comcast!

You don't have to install any software. You can use googles DNS so you just point your router or pc at 4.4.4.4 or 8.8.8.8

how does openDNS or googleDNS work?
1481431000
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481431000

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481431000
Reply with quote  #2

1481431000
Report to moderator
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1481431000
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481431000

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481431000
Reply with quote  #2

1481431000
Report to moderator
1481431000
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481431000

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481431000
Reply with quote  #2

1481431000
Report to moderator
1481431000
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481431000

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481431000
Reply with quote  #2

1481431000
Report to moderator
Red Emerald
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 742



View Profile WWW
January 23, 2012, 08:32:30 PM
 #42

wow so this is why bitcoinica hasnt been loading for me!   Shocked

just installed openDNS screw comcast!

You don't have to install any software. You can use googles DNS so you just point your router or pc at 4.4.4.4 or 8.8.8.8

how does openDNS or googleDNS work?
They are public dns servers.  Do you know how DNS works?

http://www.opendns.com/ http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/

cypherdoc
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1764



View Profile
January 23, 2012, 09:43:48 PM
 #43

wow so this is why bitcoinica hasnt been loading for me!   Shocked

just installed openDNS screw comcast!

You don't have to install any software. You can use googles DNS so you just point your router or pc at 4.4.4.4 or 8.8.8.8

how does openDNS or googleDNS work?
They are public dns servers.  Do you know how DNS works?

http://www.opendns.com/ http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/

not really which is probably why i can't relate to Namecoin.
notme
Legendary
*
Online Online

Activity: 1540


View Profile
January 23, 2012, 09:50:45 PM
 #44

wow so this is why bitcoinica hasnt been loading for me!   Shocked

just installed openDNS screw comcast!

You don't have to install any software. You can use googles DNS so you just point your router or pc at 4.4.4.4 or 8.8.8.8

how does openDNS or googleDNS work?
They are public dns servers.  Do you know how DNS works?

http://www.opendns.com/ http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/

not really which is probably why i can't relate to Namecoin.

DNS or Domain Name Service simply turns a name (bitcoinica.com) into an IP address (50.56.4.62).  This IP address is used to identify the computer you are communicating with, and to help your communications find the best path to that computer.  Normally, you use the DNS server provided by your ISP, but when that server isn't providing you with the information you want, you can use any public DNS server by changing the IP address you send your queries to.

https://www.bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf
While no idea is perfect, some ideas are useful.
12jh3odyAAaR2XedPKZNCR4X4sebuotQzN
cypherdoc
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1764



View Profile
January 23, 2012, 09:58:55 PM
 #45

wow so this is why bitcoinica hasnt been loading for me!   Shocked

just installed openDNS screw comcast!

You don't have to install any software. You can use googles DNS so you just point your router or pc at 4.4.4.4 or 8.8.8.8

how does openDNS or googleDNS work?
They are public dns servers.  Do you know how DNS works?

http://www.opendns.com/ http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/

not really which is probably why i can't relate to Namecoin.

DNS or Domain Name Service simply turns a name (bitcoinica.com) into an IP address (50.56.4.62).  This IP address is used to identify the computer you are communicating with, and to help your communications find the best path to that computer.  Normally, you use the DNS server provided by your ISP, but when that server isn't providing you with the information you want, you can use any public DNS server by changing the IP address you send your queries to.

i've entered preferred DNS server numbers into my IPv4 LAN connection settings a zillion times but never really understood what the hell i was doing.  so they don't have to be Cox's but any server i so choose? Grin
notme
Legendary
*
Online Online

Activity: 1540


View Profile
January 23, 2012, 10:01:56 PM
 #46

i've entered preferred DNS server numbers into my IPv4 LAN connection settings a zillion times but never really understood what the hell i was doing.  so they don't have to be Cox's but any server i so choose? Grin

Right... you can even write your own DNS server that points every name to bitcoinica's IP if you so choose Wink.

https://www.bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf
While no idea is perfect, some ideas are useful.
12jh3odyAAaR2XedPKZNCR4X4sebuotQzN
cypherdoc
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1764



View Profile
January 23, 2012, 10:06:46 PM
 #47

i've entered preferred DNS server numbers into my IPv4 LAN connection settings a zillion times but never really understood what the hell i was doing.  so they don't have to be Cox's but any server i so choose? Grin

Right... you can even write your own DNS server that points every name to bitcoinica's IP if you so choose Wink.

well then, Cox better not mess with ME! Wink
Dutch Merganser
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 84


View Profile
January 23, 2012, 11:24:04 PM
 #48

i've entered preferred DNS server numbers into my IPv4 LAN connection settings a zillion times but never really understood what the hell i was doing.  so they don't have to be Cox's but any server i so choose? Grin

Right... you can even write your own DNS server that points every name to bitcoinica's IP if you so choose Wink.

FWIW, I've run a local DNS server since my client was OS2 2.0 and my connection was dial up, with a slow connection it did a lot for reducing perceived latency when web browsing.

These days there are a lot of alternatives, but the standard is a program called BIND, which can be had for just about any platform. Linux distributions provide it universally, and it's pretty tolerable to set up on Windows as well. It does things beyond simple caching that the built-in Windows DNS cache does not.

http://www.isc.org/software/bind

The simplest thing to set up with BIND is a caching server with forwarding, the last time I installed it under Windows ( sometime in the 1990s ) this was the default configuration. You do have to add the IP addresses for your forwarding servers ( e.g. your ISP ) and then point your local IP configuration to query the local name server at 127.0.0.1 .

The reason I mention all this is that I had a hard time replicating the problem described here, I'd never seen it. It had been so long since I did my set up I had to consider why.

As it turns out, my DNS forwarders are Comcast and Google. Here's a portion of my named.conf, one of the configuration files for bind ( the program executable is usually "named" or "named.exe" ).

        forward first;
        forwarders {
                75.75.75.75;
                75.75.76.76;
                8.8.8.8;
                8.8.4.4;
        };

Beyond that BIND will identify the authoritative name servers for a given name and query those directly, in this case NS1.XWAYLAB.COM and NS2.XWAYLAB.COM for bitcoinica.com .

So, using BIND can provide robust name resolution from multiple sources, it worked transparently for me with the bitcoinica .com DNSSEC issue present, most likely by using Google to resolve the authoritative servers and then using those to resolve the actual name.

"Science flies you to the Moon, religion flies you into buildings."
 - Victor Stenger

"Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and the rulers as useful."
 - Seneca the Elder (ca. 54 BCE - ca. 39 CE) Roman rhetorician
Red Emerald
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 742



View Profile WWW
January 23, 2012, 11:38:46 PM
 #49

i've entered preferred DNS server numbers into my IPv4 LAN connection settings a zillion times but never really understood what the hell i was doing.  so they don't have to be Cox's but any server i so choose? Grin

Right... you can even write your own DNS server that points every name to bitcoinica's IP if you so choose Wink.

FWIW, I've run a local DNS server since my client was OS2 2.0 and my connection was dial up, with a slow connection it did a lot for reducing perceived latency when web browsing.

These days there are a lot of alternatives, but the standard is a program called BIND, which can be had for just about any platform. Linux distributions provide it universally, and it's pretty tolerable to set up on Windows as well. It does things beyond simple caching that the built-in Windows DNS cache does not.

http://www.isc.org/software/bind

The simplest thing to set up with BIND is a caching server with forwarding, the last time I installed it under Windows ( sometime in the 1990s ) this was the default configuration. You do have to add the IP addresses for your forwarding servers ( e.g. your ISP ) and then point your local IP configuration to query the local name server at 127.0.0.1 .

The reason I mention all this is that I had a hard time replicating the problem described here, I'd never seen it. It had been so long since I did my set up I had to consider why.

As it turns out, my DNS forwarders are Comcast and Google. Here's a portion of my named.conf, one of the configuration files for bind ( the program executable is usually "named" or "named.exe" ).

        forward first;
        forwarders {
                75.75.75.75;
                75.75.76.76;
                8.8.8.8;
                8.8.4.4;
        };

Beyond that BIND will identify the authoritative name servers for a given name and query those directly, in this case NS1.XWAYLAB.COM and NS2.XWAYLAB.COM for bitcoinica.com .

So, using BIND can provide robust name resolution from multiple sources, it worked transparently for me with the bitcoinica .com DNSSEC issue present, most likely by using Google to resolve the authoritative servers and then using those to resolve the actual name.

If you do setup your own DNS, its also easy to resolve .bit IP names.

Code:
zone "bit" {
        type forward;
        forwarders {
                178.32.31.41; // French bit DNS
                78.47.86.43;  // German bit DNS
        };
};
zone "onion" {
        type master;
        file "named.empty";
        allow-update { none; };
};

Dutch Merganser
Member
**
Offline Offline

Activity: 84


View Profile
January 23, 2012, 11:58:38 PM
 #50

i've entered preferred DNS server numbers into my IPv4 LAN connection settings a zillion times but never really understood what the hell i was doing.  so they don't have to be Cox's but any server i so choose? Grin

Right... you can even write your own DNS server that points every name to bitcoinica's IP if you so choose Wink.

FWIW, I've run a local DNS server since my client was OS2 2.0 and my connection was dial up, with a slow connection it did a lot for reducing perceived latency when web browsing.

These days there are a lot of alternatives, but the standard is a program called BIND, which can be had for just about any platform. Linux distributions provide it universally, and it's pretty tolerable to set up on Windows as well. It does things beyond simple caching that the built-in Windows DNS cache does not.

http://www.isc.org/software/bind

The simplest thing to set up with BIND is a caching server with forwarding, the last time I installed it under Windows ( sometime in the 1990s ) this was the default configuration. You do have to add the IP addresses for your forwarding servers ( e.g. your ISP ) and then point your local IP configuration to query the local name server at 127.0.0.1 .

The reason I mention all this is that I had a hard time replicating the problem described here, I'd never seen it. It had been so long since I did my set up I had to consider why.

As it turns out, my DNS forwarders are Comcast and Google. Here's a portion of my named.conf, one of the configuration files for bind ( the program executable is usually "named" or "named.exe" ).

        forward first;
        forwarders {
                75.75.75.75;
                75.75.76.76;
                8.8.8.8;
                8.8.4.4;
        };

Beyond that BIND will identify the authoritative name servers for a given name and query those directly, in this case NS1.XWAYLAB.COM and NS2.XWAYLAB.COM for bitcoinica.com .

So, using BIND can provide robust name resolution from multiple sources, it worked transparently for me with the bitcoinica .com DNSSEC issue present, most likely by using Google to resolve the authoritative servers and then using those to resolve the actual name.

If you do setup your own DNS, its also easy to resolve .bit IP names.

Code:
zone "bit" {
        type forward;
        forwarders {
                178.32.31.41; // French bit DNS
                78.47.86.43;  // German bit DNS
        };
};
zone "onion" {
        type master;
        file "named.empty";
        allow-update { none; };
};

Good stuff. It reminded me that at one time or the other I've configured some of the alternate DNS services that have come and gone over the years this way.

When I first became acquainted with BIND I had to deal with a worldwide private corporate network parts of which were set up by lazy/crazy people who never bothered to RTFM before they started, definitely the bad old days. It made me handier with BIND than I ever wanted to be. Things are so much simpler these days that I'm definitely out of practice  Smiley

"Science flies you to the Moon, religion flies you into buildings."
 - Victor Stenger

"Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and the rulers as useful."
 - Seneca the Elder (ca. 54 BCE - ca. 39 CE) Roman rhetorician
Pages: « 1 2 [3]  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!