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Author Topic: Ashton Kutcher is among the early investors in Dwolla  (Read 2799 times)
Phinnaeus Gage
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April 20, 2012, 06:56:53 AM
 #21

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/kutcher-among-early-investors-in-iowa-based-flat-fee-payments-startup-dwolla/2012/04/11/gIQAyfBmAT_story.html
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“The potential for Dwolla is to be the backbone for the global financial exchange. Because it’s built to do that. It’s built better than any system that currently exists.”

BRB! Goin' to take a hit, then reread that quote.

Back! Yep, it's still there.

Carry on.

~Bruno~
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April 20, 2012, 09:21:30 AM
 #22

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/kutcher-among-early-investors-in-iowa-based-flat-fee-payments-startup-dwolla/2012/04/11/gIQAyfBmAT_story.html
Quote
“The potential for Dwolla is to be the backbone for the global financial exchange. Because it’s built to do that. It’s built better than any system that currently exists.”

BRB! Goin' to take a hit, then reread that quote.

Back! Yep, it's still there.

Carry on.

~Bruno~

LOL

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If BTC became the global currency & money supply = 100 Trillion then ⊅1.00 BTC = $4,761,904.76.
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April 20, 2012, 10:53:34 AM
 #23

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RR7kRXWQo2I#t=957s

Did Ashton major in fuzzy math? I can't figure out the math here. First he says that the average restaurants makes $70,000 gross profit (his words). But only 3% of that is net profits. The credit cards charge 3.6% of the gross sales, cutting into that profit. With Dwolla, the restaurants can now double their profits.

Watch the video (timestamped) to see if you can make heads or tails of what's he's trying to relay.

~Bruno~
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Let's talk governance, lipstick, and pigs.


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April 20, 2012, 12:23:26 PM
 #24

Dwolla is a roach motel. It's not FDIC insured. It's just a matter of time before it is hacked.

Any significantly advanced cryptocurrency is indistinguishable from Ponzi Tulips.
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April 20, 2012, 03:51:50 PM
 #25

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RR7kRXWQo2I#t=957s

Did Ashton major in fuzzy math? I can't figure out the math here. First he says that the average restaurants makes $70,000 gross profit (his words). But only 3% of that is net profits. The credit cards charge 3.6% of the gross sales, cutting into that profit. With Dwolla, the restaurants can now double their profits.

Watch the video (timestamped) to see if you can make heads or tails of what's he's trying to relay.

~Bruno~

Makes sense to me.

$70,000 gross profits = 3% means that total revenue for the average restaurant would be $70,000/3% = ~$2.3M.  And if they could chop 3.6% of expenses due to no longer using credit cards, then their total gross profits would rise to 6.6% of ~$2.3M, or $152,000.  Hence, they could double their profits if they could get rid of those pesky CC fees.
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April 20, 2012, 05:40:36 PM
 #26

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RR7kRXWQo2I#t=957s

Did Ashton major in fuzzy math? I can't figure out the math here. First he says that the average restaurants makes $70,000 gross profit (his words). But only 3% of that is net profits. The credit cards charge 3.6% of the gross sales, cutting into that profit. With Dwolla, the restaurants can now double their profits.

Watch the video (timestamped) to see if you can make heads or tails of what's he's trying to relay.

~Bruno~

Makes sense to me.

$70,000 gross profits = 3% means that total revenue for the average restaurant would be $70,000/3% = ~$2.3M.  And if they could chop 3.6% of expenses due to no longer using credit cards, then their total gross profits would rise to 6.6% of ~$2.3M, or $152,000.  Hence, they could double their profits if they could get rid of those pesky CC fees.

Does your equation take into consideration that Ashton was talking about $70,000 gross profit per MONTH (not year)?

~Bruno~
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April 20, 2012, 05:46:52 PM
 #27

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RR7kRXWQo2I#t=957s

Did Ashton major in fuzzy math? I can't figure out the math here. First he says that the average restaurants makes $70,000 gross profit (his words). But only 3% of that is net profits. The credit cards charge 3.6% of the gross sales, cutting into that profit. With Dwolla, the restaurants can now double their profits.

Watch the video (timestamped) to see if you can make heads or tails of what's he's trying to relay.

~Bruno~

Makes sense to me.

$70,000 gross profits = 3% means that total revenue for the average restaurant would be $70,000/3% = ~$2.3M.  And if they could chop 3.6% of expenses due to no longer using credit cards, then their total gross profits would rise to 6.6% of ~$2.3M, or $152,000.  Hence, they could double their profits if they could get rid of those pesky CC fees.

Does your equation take into consideration that Ashton was talking about $70,000 gross profit per MONTH (not year)?

~Bruno~

Doesn't really matter what timeframe is being talked about.  $70,000 profit is 3% of $2.3M revenue per month or per year or per decade or per day.  It's the same calculation regardless.
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April 20, 2012, 06:13:27 PM
 #28

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RR7kRXWQo2I#t=957s

Did Ashton major in fuzzy math? I can't figure out the math here. First he says that the average restaurants makes $70,000 gross profit (his words). But only 3% of that is net profits. The credit cards charge 3.6% of the gross sales, cutting into that profit. With Dwolla, the restaurants can now double their profits.

Watch the video (timestamped) to see if you can make heads or tails of what's he's trying to relay.

~Bruno~

Makes sense to me.

$70,000 gross profits = 3% means that total revenue for the average restaurant would be $70,000/3% = ~$2.3M.  And if they could chop 3.6% of expenses due to no longer using credit cards, then their total gross profits would rise to 6.6% of ~$2.3M, or $152,000.  Hence, they could double their profits if they could get rid of those pesky CC fees.

Does your equation take into consideration that Ashton was talking about $70,000 gross profit per MONTH (not year)?

~Bruno~

Doesn't really matter what timeframe is being talked about.  $70,000 profit is 3% of $2.3M revenue per month or per year or per decade or per day.  It's the same calculation regardless.

The point I was trying to make early on was that Ashton misspoke. The $70,000 is gross sales, not gross profit. Then he mentions the term net profits. He and his investment team is investing in companies, but gets the three basic terms confused: gross; net; profit. During the interview at that point, I was watching Ben's reaction, and it looked like he at least knew the difference. He probably opted to not correct Ashton for he may be able to use his assumed lack of basic accounting to his (Ben) advantage down the road. Do the Dwolla comes to mind.

Also, the average restaurant does not gross $2.3M in sales per month or year.

~Bruno~
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April 20, 2012, 06:31:03 PM
 #29

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RR7kRXWQo2I#t=957s

Did Ashton major in fuzzy math? I can't figure out the math here. First he says that the average restaurants makes $70,000 gross profit (his words). But only 3% of that is net profits. The credit cards charge 3.6% of the gross sales, cutting into that profit. With Dwolla, the restaurants can now double their profits.

Watch the video (timestamped) to see if you can make heads or tails of what's he's trying to relay.

~Bruno~

Makes sense to me.

$70,000 gross profits = 3% means that total revenue for the average restaurant would be $70,000/3% = ~$2.3M.  And if they could chop 3.6% of expenses due to no longer using credit cards, then their total gross profits would rise to 6.6% of ~$2.3M, or $152,000.  Hence, they could double their profits if they could get rid of those pesky CC fees.

Does your equation take into consideration that Ashton was talking about $70,000 gross profit per MONTH (not year)?

~Bruno~

Doesn't really matter what timeframe is being talked about.  $70,000 profit is 3% of $2.3M revenue per month or per year or per decade or per day.  It's the same calculation regardless.

The point I was trying to make early on was that Ashton misspoke. The $70,000 is gross sales, not gross profit. Then he mentions the term net profits. He and his investment team is investing in companies, but gets the three basic terms confused: gross; net; profit. During the interview at that point, I was watching Ben's reaction, and it looked like he at least knew the difference. He probably opted to not correct Ashton for he may be able to use his assumed lack of basic accounting to his (Ben) advantage down the road. Do the Dwolla comes to mind.

Also, the average restaurant does not gross $2.3M in sales per month or year.

~Bruno~
See, I have no idea how much a restaurant generally takes in, so questioning that number didn't even come into my mind.  :p
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April 20, 2012, 06:49:11 PM
 #30

Ben Milne is going to pull-a-dwolla on Ashton...

And I predicted it first! Grin

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April 20, 2012, 06:56:28 PM
 #31

Ben Milne is going to pull-a-dwolla on Ashton...

And I predicted it first! Grin

Not to take away your thunder, but that's what I meant--pull-a-dwolla not do a dwolla. Good call!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RR7kRXWQo2I#t=957s

Did Ashton major in fuzzy math? I can't figure out the math here. First he says that the average restaurants makes $70,000 gross profit (his words). But only 3% of that is net profits. The credit cards charge 3.6% of the gross sales, cutting into that profit. With Dwolla, the restaurants can now double their profits.

Watch the video (timestamped) to see if you can make heads or tails of what's he's trying to relay.

~Bruno~

Makes sense to me.

$70,000 gross profits = 3% means that total revenue for the average restaurant would be $70,000/3% = ~$2.3M.  And if they could chop 3.6% of expenses due to no longer using credit cards, then their total gross profits would rise to 6.6% of ~$2.3M, or $152,000.  Hence, they could double their profits if they could get rid of those pesky CC fees.

Does your equation take into consideration that Ashton was talking about $70,000 gross profit per MONTH (not year)?

~Bruno~

Doesn't really matter what timeframe is being talked about.  $70,000 profit is 3% of $2.3M revenue per month or per year or per decade or per day.  It's the same calculation regardless.

The point I was trying to make early on was that Ashton misspoke. The $70,000 is gross sales, not gross profit. Then he mentions the term net profits. He and his investment team is investing in companies, but gets the three basic terms confused: gross; net; profit. During the interview at that point, I was watching Ben's reaction, and it looked like he at least knew the difference. He probably opted to not correct Ashton for he may be able to use his assumed lack of basic accounting to his (Ben) advantage down the road. Do the Dwolla comes to mind.

Also, the average restaurant does not gross $2.3M in sales per month or year.

~Bruno~
See, I have no idea how much a restaurant generally takes in, so questioning that number didn't even come into my mind.  :p

I hope you my comments in replying to you didn't come across as rude, SgtSpike.

~Bruno~
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April 20, 2012, 06:58:10 PM
 #32

Ben Milne is going to pull-a-dwolla on Ashton...

And I predicted it first! Grin

Not to take away your thunder, but that's what I meant--pull-a-dwolla not do a dwolla. Good call!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RR7kRXWQo2I#t=957s

Did Ashton major in fuzzy math? I can't figure out the math here. First he says that the average restaurants makes $70,000 gross profit (his words). But only 3% of that is net profits. The credit cards charge 3.6% of the gross sales, cutting into that profit. With Dwolla, the restaurants can now double their profits.

Watch the video (timestamped) to see if you can make heads or tails of what's he's trying to relay.

~Bruno~

Makes sense to me.

$70,000 gross profits = 3% means that total revenue for the average restaurant would be $70,000/3% = ~$2.3M.  And if they could chop 3.6% of expenses due to no longer using credit cards, then their total gross profits would rise to 6.6% of ~$2.3M, or $152,000.  Hence, they could double their profits if they could get rid of those pesky CC fees.

Does your equation take into consideration that Ashton was talking about $70,000 gross profit per MONTH (not year)?

~Bruno~

Doesn't really matter what timeframe is being talked about.  $70,000 profit is 3% of $2.3M revenue per month or per year or per decade or per day.  It's the same calculation regardless.

The point I was trying to make early on was that Ashton misspoke. The $70,000 is gross sales, not gross profit. Then he mentions the term net profits. He and his investment team is investing in companies, but gets the three basic terms confused: gross; net; profit. During the interview at that point, I was watching Ben's reaction, and it looked like he at least knew the difference. He probably opted to not correct Ashton for he may be able to use his assumed lack of basic accounting to his (Ben) advantage down the road. Do the Dwolla comes to mind.

Also, the average restaurant does not gross $2.3M in sales per month or year.

~Bruno~
See, I have no idea how much a restaurant generally takes in, so questioning that number didn't even come into my mind.  :p

I hope you my comments in replying to you didn't come across as rude, SgtSpike.

~Bruno~

Not at all Bruno!
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