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Author Topic: IPv6 now live on bitcoin network - please test  (Read 9217 times)
jgarzik
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May 12, 2012, 01:45:26 AM
 #1

sipa just pushed out IPv6 support to bitcoin/bitcoin.git.

If you have IPv6 support on your network, please help test.  (note - this requires being able to compile the source code yourself)


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May 12, 2012, 04:05:42 AM
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This is great, however I don't care to compile for Windows. I have a few HE.net tunnels that I should be able to test with, is there a way to disable IPv4 in the client in order to run the tests?

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May 12, 2012, 04:52:47 AM
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I would like to test, but I can't compile on my win7 machine. I have always been excited about ipv6 and am glad that bitcoin is finally getting into it!

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May 12, 2012, 05:41:34 AM
 #4

Sweet, I'll give it a try tomorrow

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May 12, 2012, 09:23:15 AM
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Yay! Bitlc.net won't be the only provider having full IPv6 support then! Smiley
I'm setting up a bitcoind-node with v6 in a few hours.

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May 12, 2012, 10:50:46 AM
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This is great, however I don't care to compile for Windows. I have a few HE.net tunnels that I should be able to test with, is there a way to disable IPv4 in the client in order to run the tests?

Yes, there's a new command-line option -blocknet=X, where X can be ipv4 or ipv6. Using it means the client won't listen (at least not by default) to X interfaces, and will not attempt outgoing connections to that network.

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May 12, 2012, 03:44:21 PM
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Mine is up and listening on 2001:ba8:1c8:104:6a05:caff:fe05:7b39 - no ipv6 connections at the moment though. :p
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May 20, 2012, 12:26:10 AM
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I got a v6 node up and running at home now to. Located at 2001:16d8:ff00:559::2 (Sixxs tunnel)

Got TWO connections so far, in total... But it works, the blockchain takes for ever to download tho, guessing it's because the low connection amount.

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May 20, 2012, 09:20:26 PM
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Our DNS seeds are now returning AAAA records.

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May 22, 2012, 05:46:16 AM
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It's great to finally see IPv6 support!  This should be a big win.

I'm running IPv6 at 2002:c6ca:19fb:1:21f:16ff:fe29:d04c (git commit d6615a5 on Linux).  The system has a NATted 1918 IPv4 address, two 6to4 IPv6 addresses, and a Teredo address.  For the 3 days and 1 hour it's been up, bitcoind has apparently never tried contacting or been contacted by another IPv6 node.  It's started as "bitcoind -printtoconsole" and only has rpcpassword set in bitcoin.conf.  getinfo reports 8 connections (to be expected because I don't have IPv4 port forwarding set up).  I've verified it is listening on [::]:8333 with netstat.

-blocknet is now apparently -onlynet, where the meaning has changed to only allow one address family rather than exclude it.  I tried starting bitcoind with -onlynet=ipv6 and get 4 connections total.  IPv6 does work in this case.  It's been 2.3 hours, and I'll let it run like this for the time being.

IMO, the availability of IPv6 on a machine, even via transition technologies like 6to4 or Teredo, should increase the number of usable peer connections that the Bitcoin client has at its disposal; IPv6 should open up new opportunities for direct peering that couldn't happen automatically behind NAT.  From my experience with stock settings in a situation like this, the IPv6 improvements did nothing over that 3-day period.  Maybe there's a way to program the client or tweak the protocol to encourage additional IPv6 connections (without excluding IPv4 entirely)?
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June 06, 2012, 10:33:35 AM
 #11

What's the benefit of using IPv6?

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June 06, 2012, 10:46:23 AM
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What's the benefit of using IPv6?
Among others, NAT is not supported - more peers should be reachable that are now behind home routers. Also, roaming - connections are not lost when you switch networks (but this depends on proper implementation at ISPs, we'll see)

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June 06, 2012, 11:19:25 AM
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The number one advantage of IPv6 over IPv4 is the much larger address space. To quote Vint Cerf, one of the "fathers of the internet", a few weeks ago:
Quote
The other thing that is very important for the last decade or so, is the introduction of mobile technology. There are 5.5 billion or so mobiles in use today; not all of them are internet-capable, but probably 20% to 25% are, and over time that percentage will go up. The reason that's important, is that for many people their first introduction to the internet comes through a mobile as opposed to a desktop or a laptop or an iPad. For many it will stay that way, and for others: they will begin to accumulate other devices that they will use in addition to their mobiles. But that adds a huge demand for address space on the network, because if every mobile that is internet-enabled has to have an IP address assigned, eventually you start to run out of IP addresses. And in fact, that's what we're faced with today.

We chose a 32-bit address space in 1973, in order to carry out an experiment. And I want to emphasize that this was an experiment. What I though was that if the experiment succeeded, then we would design a production version of the system. Well the problem is that the experiment never ended, and so we're still using the experimental internet which only has 4.3 billion terminations built into its design. So in 1996 in a great panic, we developed, and here "we" in this case is not Bob (Kahn) and me but rather the IETF, developed an alternative packet format called IPv6. It has 128 bits of address space and if you do the math that's 3.4*10^38 addresses. This is a number only the (?) can appreciate. We are now in the process of introducing in parallel with IPv4 the IPv6 formats. So on june 8th last year (2011), many of us in the internet community turned on the IPv6 capabilities that we had in addition to IPv4. On june 6th this year, all of us are going to turn on IPv6 and leave it on. So this is a very important year for the internet because IPv6 will be launched on june 6th. Google and many other have been preparing for this for several years and we're all looking forward to seeing what happens when we turn it on and leave it on permanently.

On a more practical note: bcause of IPv6 much larger address space, addresses are much cheaper, and typical home internet connections are intended to provide many - enough to give each household device its own public address (though firewalled) without needing atrocities like NAT (creating a separate independent local network, and translate addresses between them) and UPnP to overcome it.

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June 06, 2012, 11:25:18 AM
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The number one advantage of IPv6 over IPv4 is the much larger address space. To quote Vint Cerf, one of the "fathers of the internet", a few weeks ago:
Quote
The other thing that is very important for the last decade or so, is the introduction of mobile technology. There are 5.5 billion or so mobiles in use today; not all of them are internet-capable, but probably 20% to 25% are, and over time that percentage will go up. The reason that's important, is that for many people their first introduction to the internet comes through a mobile as opposed to a desktop or a laptop or an iPad. For many it will stay that way, and for others: they will begin to accumulate other devices that they will use in addition to their mobiles. But that adds a huge demand for address space on the network, because if every mobile that is internet-enabled has to have an IP address assigned, eventually you start to run out of IP addresses. And in fact, that's what we're faced with today.

We chose a 32-bit address space in 1973, in order to carry out an experiment. And I want to emphasize that this was an experiment. What I though was that if the experiment succeeded, then we would design a production version of the system. Well the problem is that the experiment never ended, and so we're still using the experimental internet which only has 4.3 billion terminations built into its design. So in 1996 in a great panic, we developed, and here "we" in this case is not Bob (Kahn) and me but rather the IETF, developed an alternative packet format called IPv6. It has 128 bits of address space and if you do the math that's 3.4*10^38 addresses. This is a number only the (?) can appreciate. We are now in the process of introducing in parallel with IPv4 the IPv6 formats. So on june 8th last year (2011), many of us in the internet community turned on the IPv6 capabilities that we had in addition to IPv4. On june 6th this year, all of us are going to turn on IPv6 and leave it on. So this is a very important year for the internet because IPv6 will be launched on june 6th. Google and many other have been preparing for this for several years and we're all looking forward to seeing what happens when we turn it on and leave it on permanently.

On a more practical note: bcause of IPv6 much larger address space, addresses are much cheaper, and typical home internet connections are intended to provide many - enough to give each household device its own public address (though firewalled) without needing atrocities like NAT (creating a separate independent local network, and translate addresses between them) and UPnP to overcome it.

Off topic : Gavin Andresen also describes bitcoin as "an experiment"

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June 06, 2012, 12:12:56 PM
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My ISP doesn't even know what IPv6 is  Undecided
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June 06, 2012, 12:29:18 PM
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The number one advantage of IPv6 over IPv4 is the much larger address space. To quote Vint Cerf, one of the "fathers of the internet", a few weeks ago:
Quote
The other thing that is very important for the last decade or so, is the introduction of mobile technology. There are 5.5 billion or so mobiles in use today; not all of them are internet-capable, but probably 20% to 25% are, and over time that percentage will go up. The reason that's important, is that for many people their first introduction to the internet comes through a mobile as opposed to a desktop or a laptop or an iPad. For many it will stay that way, and for others: they will begin to accumulate other devices that they will use in addition to their mobiles. But that adds a huge demand for address space on the network, because if every mobile that is internet-enabled has to have an IP address assigned, eventually you start to run out of IP addresses. And in fact, that's what we're faced with today.

We chose a 32-bit address space in 1973, in order to carry out an experiment. And I want to emphasize that this was an experiment. What I though was that if the experiment succeeded, then we would design a production version of the system. Well the problem is that the experiment never ended, and so we're still using the experimental internet which only has 4.3 billion terminations built into its design. So in 1996 in a great panic, we developed, and here "we" in this case is not Bob (Kahn) and me but rather the IETF, developed an alternative packet format called IPv6. It has 128 bits of address space and if you do the math that's 3.4*10^38 addresses. This is a number only the (?) can appreciate. We are now in the process of introducing in parallel with IPv4 the IPv6 formats. So on june 8th last year (2011), many of us in the internet community turned on the IPv6 capabilities that we had in addition to IPv4. On june 6th this year, all of us are going to turn on IPv6 and leave it on. So this is a very important year for the internet because IPv6 will be launched on june 6th. Google and many other have been preparing for this for several years and we're all looking forward to seeing what happens when we turn it on and leave it on permanently.

On a more practical note: bcause of IPv6 much larger address space, addresses are much cheaper, and typical home internet connections are intended to provide many - enough to give each household device its own public address (though firewalled) without needing atrocities like NAT (creating a separate independent local network, and translate addresses between them) and UPnP to overcome it.

So all there's no need for local networks anymore, is that the idea, every device having an IPv6 address? If I got this right, what does it mean for security?

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June 06, 2012, 12:43:02 PM
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So all there's no need for local networks anymore, is that the idea, every device having an IPv6 address? If I got this right, what does it mean for security?
1. NAT is not a firewall
2. You can have local IPv6 addresses if you really want to

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June 06, 2012, 04:16:17 PM
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Quote
So all there's no need for local networks anymore, is that the idea, every device having an IPv6 address? If I got this right, what does it mean for security?

http://securityaffairs.co/wordpress/2416/cyber-crime/ddos-ipv6-is-an-excuse-to-talk-about.html

At least it means all anonymity will be gone, as i see it; every user will become his own unique IPv6 Adress what makes it then for each node quite easyly to be identified.

Im not sure if IPv6 does realy make sense for the bitcoin project..
In my oppinion we should wait with IPv6

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June 06, 2012, 08:56:33 PM
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Where is the best place to report compile errors?
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June 06, 2012, 10:53:04 PM
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Quote
So all there's no need for local networks anymore, is that the idea, every device having an IPv6 address? If I got this right, what does it mean for security?

http://securityaffairs.co/wordpress/2416/cyber-crime/ddos-ipv6-is-an-excuse-to-talk-about.html

At least it means all anonymity will be gone, as i see it; every user will become his own unique IPv6 Adress what makes it then for each node quite easyly to be identified.

Im not sure if IPv6 does realy make sense for the bitcoin project..
In my oppinion we should wait with IPv6
A static IPv6 subnet with privacy extensions enabled is no worse than a static IPv4 address and NAT. Dynamic IPv4 addresses don't offer all that much protection if someone really wants to find out who you are; the ISP can always look up who was assigned that address at the time.

For anything more than superficial anonymity, you need onion routing, al la Tor or I2P, to disguise the sources of your connections among a pool of other addresses with multiple independent levels of indirection.
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