Bitcoin Forum
September 21, 2018, 07:02:22 AM *
News: ♦♦ New info! Bitcoin Core users absolutely must upgrade to previously-announced 0.16.3 [Torrent]. All Bitcoin users should temporarily trust confirmations slightly less. More info.
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: « 1 ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 [60]
  Print  
Author Topic: Inflation and Deflation of Price and Money Supply  (Read 524186 times)
lut
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1
Merit: 0


View Profile
September 08, 2018, 12:56:01 PM
 #1181

Recently a friend of mine work with trading x-crypto.com. This provides useful price exchanging BTC Payoffs by paypal are blameless.
1537513342
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1537513342

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1537513342
Reply with quote  #2

1537513342
Report to moderator
1537513342
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1537513342

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1537513342
Reply with quote  #2

1537513342
Report to moderator
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1537513342
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1537513342

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1537513342
Reply with quote  #2

1537513342
Report to moderator
nematography
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 10
Merit: 0


View Profile
September 08, 2018, 01:28:07 PM
 #1182

According to Keynesian economists, inflation comes in two varieties: demand-pull and cost-push. Demand-pull inflation occurs when consumers demand goods, possibly because of a larger money supply, at a rate faster than production. Cost-push inflation occurs when the input prices for goods tend to rise, possibly because of a larger money supply, at a rate faster than consumer preferences change.
topsyze
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 28
Merit: 0


View Profile
September 09, 2018, 11:08:03 AM
 #1183

Willing to learn more, following...
YXIN02
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 28
Merit: 0


View Profile
September 09, 2018, 11:12:24 AM
 #1184

I think mining is bring down hazard than trading in light of the fact that the prizes are unsurprising. It's as yet conceivable to be dumb and accomplish something like CPU mining, which gets you basically 0 reward and costs you a considerable measure as far as power and so on. However, accepting diggers are normal and fit for assessing the cost/advantage, and expecting the ASIC merchants start thinking responsibly so free market activity for ASIC mining equipment levels out, at that point mining is bring down hazard as a result of the settled startup costs and unsurprising exponentially diminishing returns. It's conceivable to lose cash on mining, however the factors (trouble, square reward, arrange hash rate, mining pool expenses, PPS versus PPLNS versus DGM versus POT and so on.) are all in the open. The factors that influence you when you theorize on the trades are generally covered up.

The ASIC sellers right currently are making colossal repressed request which may even be driving the cost of BTC up as some kind of air pocket. Conventionally a normal performing artist would see this much request and react by capitalizing on it and offering ASICs until the point when the request drops down. Evidently, effectively delivering an ASIC is hard to the point that there's a kind of hindrance happening at the present time.
cescudero95
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 28
Merit: 1


View Profile
September 09, 2018, 02:55:14 PM
 #1185

What has been said in this thread, if anything, about coins who have no fixed cap, and thus unending mining designed?
florianuhlemann
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 308
Merit: 100



View Profile
September 10, 2018, 01:53:54 PM
 #1186

from all the above, I realized only one thing, that the price of bitcoin may fall not because of the presence of a huge number of sellers, but because of the lack of buyers

cleberw3b
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 29
Merit: 0


View Profile
September 10, 2018, 03:43:26 PM
 #1187

from all the above, I realized only one thing, that the price of bitcoin may fall not because of the presence of a huge number of sellers, but because of the lack of buyers

That is exact.

As more fiat currencies fall inevitably more people will come to bitcoin.
MyNameIs Trung
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 53
Merit: 0


View Profile
September 12, 2018, 01:53:36 PM
 #1188

How can a digital simulation of money become more illusory than it already is? Simulated money will always be an illusion, but because it is a simulation we do not have to accept the 'rules' coded into it as if they were the Ten Commandments. Instead, we can select the relevant sections of source code, hit the delete button, and start over.
 Undecided Undecided
errazorah
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 12
Merit: 0


View Profile
September 17, 2018, 01:22:44 PM
 #1189

Increasing the money supply faster than the growth in real output will cause inflation. The reason is that there is more money chasing the same number of goods. Therefore, the increase in monetary demand causes firms to put up prices. If the money supply increases at the same rate as real output, then prices will stay the same.
nischal123
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 142
Merit: 0


View Profile
September 17, 2018, 02:09:29 PM
 #1190

In general money supply is  undertaken by Central bank. But in the Case of Bitcoin who are responsible for increase and decrease of the supply of Bitcoin. 
msbtrooper
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 126
Merit: 0


View Profile WWW
September 20, 2018, 01:43:02 PM
 #1191

An area dedicated to discussing the differences of these two terms and the theories supporting them.

I'm looking forward to an in-depth discussion on the subject! I've noticed that confusion between the two seems to come up quite a bit on the forum, and thought it may be reasonable to dedicate a thread on the matter.

Pulled from a discussion in Wall Observer



Price-Deflation is what you are used to hearing about in Bitcoin. That term is used to describe the prices of goods/services as they decrease, because the value of Bitcoin goes up.

Price-Inflation is the opposite. When prices of goods/services increase because the value of Bitcoin goes down.

So, when dealing with Price-Inflation or Deflation, there is an inverse relationship of price and value, in regard to goods/services and Bitcoin.

Example: As the Bitcoin price goes from $10 to $20, the prices of goods/services goes down from 20BTC to 10BTC. As the Bitcoin price goes from $20 to $10, the prices of goods/services goes from 10BTC to 20BTC!

Why does the price of Bitcoin go up and down? The price of BTC goes up and down based on the exchange rate, or market price, which is set by buyers and sellers, or traders. They directly trade the Bitcoin currency with all sorts of other currency, and even some with gold; the most popular being the USD (US dollar). They set the price when executing orders to buy or sell. I will get into the actual reason of why the price fluctuates in the last section.



Now that we've gone over PRICE Inflation and Deflation (which honestly, to me, is a term made popular by Keynesian's to hide the real facts, as price inflation/deflation is simply the market exchange rate, reflective of the money supply into a currency from itself and other currencies), let's go over the REAL inflation/deflation of a currency (otherwise known by many as Monetary Inflation).

MoneySupply-Inflation is when the value of Bitcoin decreases when the total supply of Bitcoin increases. In our current state, this is at a generation rate of 25 BTC every 10 minutes.

MoneySupply-Deflation will essentially never occur. It is when the value of Bitcoin increases when the total supply of Bitcoin decreases. This may happen, say, when someone loses their private key and all the BTC associated with it are lost. This effectively "makes the rest of us richer". That being said, there is a SET DECREASE in the generation rate of BTC, so you have sort of a "deflationary effect" in the value, as long as more exchange occurs for BTC at a rate which is faster than that set generation rate.

When all 21 million coins are produced, the MoneySupply will be neutral, and the value will continue to increase (prices will decrease, consequently), as long as people continue to exchange in BTC.

This leads me to the last section.



What determines the PRICE of Bitcoin? The VALUE of Bitcoin at a particular moment.

What determines the VALUE of Bitcoin? The SUPPLY and DEMAND of Bitcoin in the economy.

What determines the SUPPLY of Bitcoin? Currently, the MoneySupply-Inflation rate of 25 BTC every 10 minutes, and traders willing to SELL Bitcoin to BUYERS in exchange for other supplies of money (currencies).

What determines the DEMAND of Bitcoin? Traders willing to BUY Bitcoin from SELLERS in exchange for other currencies.


Therefore: BUYERS, SELLERS, and MONEYSUPPLY-INFLATION (miners) determine the VALUE of Bitcoin, which determines the PRICE of BTC as BUYERS and SELLERS trade based on that VALUE (or supply and demand) of Bitcoin.


We don't exactly know the totality of the supply and demand. Sure, we could try and aggregate data from all the exchanges, but we will never be accurate as there are exchanges which can not be accounted for (OTC). The cool thing is that we DO know the MoneySupply rate, and we DO know the exchange rate. From this, we can determine a real value of Bitcoin when simply multiplying the two factors; a sort of inflation-adjusted view of the currency.

Effectively, the quantitative analysis of supply and demand is really what the currency exchange traders attempt to accurately determine which is conveyed through buying and selling of Bitcoin, setting a VALUE via the PRICED exchange rate of the currency. On a side note, most of the big Market Makers (FX Traders) use this price movement as a way to make a profitable living, as well. Especially when price fluctuations are a consequence of hype or fear (bubbles, cliffs), not factual supply/demand data, and are wildly out of the real price range.

Thus, if you analyze the proper macroeconomic data in an attempt to forecast future DEMAND for more Bitcoin (price increase), you will realize some very interesting things, and have a more accurate picture of where the price is going...

Happy trading! Wink

The keynesian school of thought postulated that money supply has complex and great influence on inflation. Keynes himself proposed that inflation was caused in a number of different ways:

1) DEMAND OUTSTRIPPING SUPPLY: This further confirm the law of demand and supply which show an inverse relationship between price and supply and a positive relationship between demand and price.

2) INFLATION BEING BUILT IN A SYSTEM: Keynes acknowledge this because in most developing economies, this is done with the machinery of government just to make some people rich.

3) HIGHER COST PUSHING INFLATION HIGHER: Keynes also talked about higher cost incurred in production which can cause inflation to also go higher. A good example of this is multiple taxes which can jark up the price of the goods another one is high prices of raw materials.

The Keynesian school of taught identified lots of reasons which i have highlighted some of it here. The school of taught is one of those school of taught in Economics which has helped in the development of economics to this level it is today and as such you can not talk on economics without mentioning The Keynesian School.
alancrypto
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1
Merit: 0


View Profile
Today at 06:02:33 AM
 #1192

mark Roll Eyes
BTCBTCBTC
Pages: « 1 ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 [60]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!