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Author Topic: [Group Buy] Avalon ASIC Batch 3 [CLOSED- Seven 4 module Avalons ordered]  (Read 48953 times)
samborambo
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March 27, 2013, 09:26:38 AM
 #421

FINALLY out of newbie exile...

Australia is 230VAC single phase, same as here. Europe is 240V. 63A is the standard pole fuse on a domestic supply here in New Zealand and probably most 220V-240V countries. Loosely speaking, this gives most customers 15kVA of supply in ideal circumstances. In fact, even if you have a 63A pole fuse, your switchboard fuse is likely to be 40A to grade properly with the pole fuse. This give a practical upper limit of 9.6kVA

Electricity supply availability is a concern, depending on the actual fusing circuit breakers, CoinHoarder has. I'm assuming each rig is around 800W = 5600W or 5.6kVA, assuming unity power factor. If CoinHoarder's house is limited to 9.6kVA, boiling the kettle when the light are on will pop the fuse.

More of a concern, though, is dirty power. Yep, I deal with power quality investigations on a regular basis. In short, if a customer's appliance blows up, we (network company) have no evidence that the fault was caused by our network. In actual fact, it probably was but we have to tell the customer to make an insurance claim on the appliance (or "tough luck"). Advanced electronic logging meters will change all that in the near future. Meanwhile, say a voltage spike fries our mining rigs: Even if CH proves it was a network fault, CH can't make an effective warranty or insurance claim. It'd be at least a month or more before the rig(s) are assessed, new rigs built, tested, shipped and commissioned.

I think the idea of co-location was mentioned earlier. I had a quick look at facilities in the states offering 1/4 of a rack for $400/month. That's a pittance for round-the-clock care, clean power, physical security, gobs of bandwidth and backup generators. CH can still get his admin premium. I just want to mitigate risk where feasible to do so.

I guess this is a conversation we'll have over the next month or so before the rigs arrive. Looking forward to making an actual contribution to the network, instead of just speculating.

Sam.
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March 27, 2013, 09:32:21 AM
 #422

FINALLY out of newbie exile...

Australia is 230VAC single phase, same as here. Europe is 240V. 63A is the standard pole fuse on a domestic supply here in New Zealand and probably most 220V-240V countries. Loosely speaking, this gives most customers 15kVA of supply in ideal circumstances. In fact, even if you have a 63A pole fuse, your switchboard fuse is likely to be 40A to grade properly with the pole fuse. This give a practical upper limit of 9.6kVA

Electricity supply availability is a concern, depending on the actual fusing circuit breakers, CoinHoarder has. I'm assuming each rig is around 800W = 5600W or 5.6kVA, assuming unity power factor. If CoinHoarder's house is limited to 9.6kVA, boiling the kettle when the light are on will pop the fuse.

More of a concern, though, is dirty power. Yep, I deal with power quality investigations on a regular basis. In short, if a customer's appliance blows up, we (network company) have no evidence that the fault was caused by our network. In actual fact, it probably was but we have to tell the customer to make an insurance claim on the appliance (or "tough luck"). Advanced electronic logging meters will change all that in the near future. Meanwhile, say a voltage spike fries our mining rigs: Even if CH proves it was a network fault, CH can't make an effective warranty or insurance claim. It'd be at least a month or more before the rig(s) are assessed, new rigs built, tested, shipped and commissioned.

I think the idea of co-location was mentioned earlier. I had a quick look at facilities in the states offering 1/4 of a rack for $400/month. That's a pittance for round-the-clock care, clean power, physical security, gobs of bandwidth and backup generators. CH can still get his admin premium. I just want to mitigate risk where feasible to do so.

I guess this is a conversation we'll have over the next month or so before the rigs arrive. Looking forward to making an actual contribution to the network, instead of just speculating.

Sam.



Congrats to all for the amazing community effort. When markets seems to cut out small-time players, community's answer is organization and mutual support.

I organized my own buy group for spaniards, and we successfully ordered what I'm guessing will be the first ASIC machine running in our city.

GREAT!

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March 27, 2013, 09:39:52 AM
 #423

Congrats guys and all the best!
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March 27, 2013, 10:43:58 AM
 #424

FINALLY out of newbie exile...

Australia is 230VAC single phase, same as here. Europe is 240V. 63A is the standard pole fuse on a domestic supply here in New Zealand and probably most 220V-240V countries. Loosely speaking, this gives most customers 15kVA of supply in ideal circumstances. In fact, even if you have a 63A pole fuse, your switchboard fuse is likely to be 40A to grade properly with the pole fuse. This give a practical upper limit of 9.6kVA

Electricity supply availability is a concern, depending on the actual fusing circuit breakers, CoinHoarder has. I'm assuming each rig is around 800W = 5600W or 5.6kVA, assuming unity power factor. If CoinHoarder's house is limited to 9.6kVA, boiling the kettle when the light are on will pop the fuse.

More of a concern, though, is dirty power. Yep, I deal with power quality investigations on a regular basis. In short, if a customer's appliance blows up, we (network company) have no evidence that the fault was caused by our network. In actual fact, it probably was but we have to tell the customer to make an insurance claim on the appliance (or "tough luck"). Advanced electronic logging meters will change all that in the near future. Meanwhile, say a voltage spike fries our mining rigs: Even if CH proves it was a network fault, CH can't make an effective warranty or insurance claim. It'd be at least a month or more before the rig(s) are assessed, new rigs built, tested, shipped and commissioned.

I think the idea of co-location was mentioned earlier. I had a quick look at facilities in the states offering 1/4 of a rack for $400/month. That's a pittance for round-the-clock care, clean power, physical security, gobs of bandwidth and backup generators. CH can still get his admin premium. I just want to mitigate risk where feasible to do so.

I guess this is a conversation we'll have over the next month or so before the rigs arrive. Looking forward to making an actual contribution to the network, instead of just speculating.

Sam.


Rack space rent maybe a good idea....but depends on the sort of insurance they offer/cost

Australia is 240V

also 3 phase is readily available, and I know quite a few houses have it.

Including ones I have lived in, the 9.6 KVA sounds realisitc.

I think that CoinH, unless he has an upgraded power supply may be in for a bit of "shock"

but I hope not

he seems to be running a LT farm, and these chew power and it looks like he does not do things by halves

He also seems to have 2 separate circus in his house for power

so he should be able to use one dedicated to ASICS and the other for house hold

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March 27, 2013, 10:54:26 AM
 #425



Congrats to all for the amazing community effort. When markets seems to cut out small-time players, community's answer is organization and mutual support.

I organized my own buy group for spaniards, and we successfully ordered what I'm guessing will be the first ASIC machine running in our city.

GREAT!

I'm really glad to see a positive community action in the bitcoin world.

I try to be respectful and informed.
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March 27, 2013, 11:17:50 AM
 #426

FINALLY out of newbie exile...

Australia is 230VAC single phase, same as here. Europe is 240V. 63A is the standard pole fuse on a domestic supply here in New Zealand and probably most 220V-240V countries. Loosely speaking, this gives most customers 15kVA of supply in ideal circumstances. In fact, even if you have a 63A pole fuse, your switchboard fuse is likely to be 40A to grade properly with the pole fuse. This give a practical upper limit of 9.6kVA

Electricity supply availability is a concern, depending on the actual fusing circuit breakers, CoinHoarder has. I'm assuming each rig is around 800W = 5600W or 5.6kVA, assuming unity power factor. If CoinHoarder's house is limited to 9.6kVA, boiling the kettle when the light are on will pop the fuse.

More of a concern, though, is dirty power. Yep, I deal with power quality investigations on a regular basis. In short, if a customer's appliance blows up, we (network company) have no evidence that the fault was caused by our network. In actual fact, it probably was but we have to tell the customer to make an insurance claim on the appliance (or "tough luck"). Advanced electronic logging meters will change all that in the near future. Meanwhile, say a voltage spike fries our mining rigs: Even if CH proves it was a network fault, CH can't make an effective warranty or insurance claim. It'd be at least a month or more before the rig(s) are assessed, new rigs built, tested, shipped and commissioned.

I think the idea of co-location was mentioned earlier. I had a quick look at facilities in the states offering 1/4 of a rack for $400/month. That's a pittance for round-the-clock care, clean power, physical security, gobs of bandwidth and backup generators. CH can still get his admin premium. I just want to mitigate risk where feasible to do so.

I guess this is a conversation we'll have over the next month or so before the rigs arrive. Looking forward to making an actual contribution to the network, instead of just speculating.

Sam.


Rack space rent maybe a good idea....but depends on the sort of insurance they offer/cost

Australia is 240V

also 3 phase is readily available, and I know quite a few houses have it.

Including ones I have lived in, the 9.6 KVA sounds realisitc.

I think that CoinH, unless he has an upgraded power supply may be in for a bit of "shock"

but I hope not

he seems to be running a LT farm, and these chew power and it looks like he does not do things by halves

He also seems to have 2 separate circus in his house for power

so he should be able to use one dedicated to ASICS and the other for house hold


Australia changed from 240V to 230V in 2000. Sorry to be pedantic!  Roll Eyes

I'm confused about the two independent circuits. I'm not sure about Australia but in NZ, buildings are only allowed one point of supply, for safe isolation in the event of a fire, etc.

Yep, running 3 phase or upgrading the existing protection on a single may be options.


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March 27, 2013, 11:45:13 AM
 #427

Wow you guys really don't know much about mains power if you think a modern US house is gonna be limited to 9.6kW.

The US standard for "regular" outlets is 120V, but they still run 240V into a most houses, plus a neutral leg which is used to make the 120V circuits.  A lot of the really high current appliances (electric stove, heat pump) are run on 240V circuits, for efficiency and to save on wire cost.

I have one of my "regular" outlets wired up for 240V, and I run my GPU miner on it when it's here.

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March 27, 2013, 11:54:49 AM
 #428

lol...hmmmm...reality is so harsh....


wonders how these 6...possible 7 avalons at 650watts apiece are going to get power from a 4Kw residential service...



open your brain folks

zif

Yeah I did wonder/ask this

he quotes some figures for his amp on two circuits / 240V

but does not have 3 phase

here I found it

30amp 240v circuit and a 60amp 240v

so that is

60 x 240 = 14.4 KW

and

30 x 240 = 7.2KW

assuming he runs nothing else

7 x 650 = 4.55 KW

so he appears to have (14.4 + 7.7)/4.55 = 4.7 x off

however given he has house hold appliances to run and a lite coin farm, we need to say he woud apear to have 2 x of what he needs.

I would rather he had 3 phase though

because even in some blackouts/brown outs the other phases keep going

I'm powering 4 7950's with a 1500w PSU full load all day on a 15 amp 120v circuit in my apartment.  I have 2 20 amp circuits and a 15 amp circuit and could easily run 10 7950's off of that.  A 15 amp house plug can provide up to 1800w at the wall plug.  He's going to be just fine.

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March 27, 2013, 12:39:58 PM
 #429

Wow you guys really don't know much about mains power if you think a modern US house is gonna be limited to 9.6kW.

The US standard for "regular" outlets is 120V, but they still run 240V into a most houses, plus a neutral leg which is used to make the 120V circuits.  A lot of the really high current appliances (electric stove, heat pump) are run on 240V circuits, for efficiency and to save on wire cost.

I have one of my "regular" outlets wired up for 240V, and I run my GPU miner on it when it's here.

so excuse my us ignorance, do they have a mixed power supply there where they have a lot of step up transformers from the generators to give 240

or do they have 240 supply mixed in with 110v so dual lines or something

Huh

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March 27, 2013, 12:51:58 PM
 #430

My unconfirmed transaction and I thank you very, very much. 0.4078734 of 1 BTC of 1 unit is better than the 0 I thought I had when I saw this thread!

No problem man, glad you made it in Smiley

Hopefully it will be the best 0.4078734 BTC you've ever spent!!  Grin Grin

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March 27, 2013, 01:09:53 PM
 #431

Wow you guys really don't know much about mains power if you think a modern US house is gonna be limited to 9.6kW.

The US standard for "regular" outlets is 120V, but they still run 240V into a most houses, plus a neutral leg which is used to make the 120V circuits.  A lot of the really high current appliances (electric stove, heat pump) are run on 240V circuits, for efficiency and to save on wire cost.

I have one of my "regular" outlets wired up for 240V, and I run my GPU miner on it when it's here.

so excuse my us ignorance, do they have a mixed power supply there where they have a lot of step up transformers from the generators to give 240

or do they have 240 supply mixed in with 110v so dual lines or something

Huh

Im no electrician but I think to get 240v its just 2 120v lines tied together.

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March 27, 2013, 01:10:39 PM
 #432

FINALLY out of newbie exile...

Australia is 230VAC single phase, same as here. Europe is 240V. 63A is the standard pole fuse on a domestic supply here in New Zealand and probably most 220V-240V countries. Loosely speaking, this gives most customers 15kVA of supply in ideal circumstances. In fact, even if you have a 63A pole fuse, your switchboard fuse is likely to be 40A to grade properly with the pole fuse. This give a practical upper limit of 9.6kVA

Electricity supply availability is a concern, depending on the actual fusing circuit breakers, CoinHoarder has. I'm assuming each rig is around 800W = 5600W or 5.6kVA, assuming unity power factor. If CoinHoarder's house is limited to 9.6kVA, boiling the kettle when the light are on will pop the fuse.

More of a concern, though, is dirty power. Yep, I deal with power quality investigations on a regular basis. In short, if a customer's appliance blows up, we (network company) have no evidence that the fault was caused by our network. In actual fact, it probably was but we have to tell the customer to make an insurance claim on the appliance (or "tough luck"). Advanced electronic logging meters will change all that in the near future. Meanwhile, say a voltage spike fries our mining rigs: Even if CH proves it was a network fault, CH can't make an effective warranty or insurance claim. It'd be at least a month or more before the rig(s) are assessed, new rigs built, tested, shipped and commissioned.

I think the idea of co-location was mentioned earlier. I had a quick look at facilities in the states offering 1/4 of a rack for $400/month. That's a pittance for round-the-clock care, clean power, physical security, gobs of bandwidth and backup generators. CH can still get his admin premium. I just want to mitigate risk where feasible to do so.

I guess this is a conversation we'll have over the next month or so before the rigs arrive. Looking forward to making an actual contribution to the network, instead of just speculating.

Sam.


Rack space rent maybe a good idea....but depends on the sort of insurance they offer/cost

Australia is 240V

also 3 phase is readily available, and I know quite a few houses have it.

Including ones I have lived in, the 9.6 KVA sounds realisitc.

I think that CoinH, unless he has an upgraded power supply may be in for a bit of "shock"

but I hope not

he seems to be running a LT farm, and these chew power and it looks like he does not do things by halves

He also seems to have 2 separate circus in his house for power

so he should be able to use one dedicated to ASICS and the other for house hold


Australia changed from 240V to 230V in 2000. Sorry to be pedantic!  Roll Eyes

I'm confused about the two independent circuits. I'm not sure about Australia but in NZ, buildings are only allowed one point of supply, for safe isolation in the event of a fire, etc.

Yep, running 3 phase or upgrading the existing protection on a single may be options.




you may well be right...why would the do that 240 = less energy transmission losses (ok just a little per house but multiply by 1 million houses)

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March 27, 2013, 01:14:50 PM
 #433

I lived in this house in Oz that when the power went out in the street, often half the power still worked in the house I lived in

we were either on another phase...or something else, separate circuit on another phase it seemed...weird stuff I was pretty young but it did happen repeatedly in this fashion.

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March 27, 2013, 02:28:34 PM
 #434

Wow you guys really don't know much about mains power if you think a modern US house is gonna be limited to 9.6kW.

The US standard for "regular" outlets is 120V, but they still run 240V into a most houses, plus a neutral leg which is used to make the 120V circuits.  A lot of the really high current appliances (electric stove, heat pump) are run on 240V circuits, for efficiency and to save on wire cost.

I have one of my "regular" outlets wired up for 240V, and I run my GPU miner on it when it's here.

so excuse my us ignorance, do they have a mixed power supply there where they have a lot of step up transformers from the generators to give 240

or do they have 240 supply mixed in with 110v so dual lines or something

Huh

They usually run 17,500 V on top of a pole.  This is from memory and I could not verify it just now--it may be 11,000V.  There are step down transformers every so many houses that feed 3 wires, presumably 240 V + neutral.  Every so many blocks the 17,500 is 3-phase.  There is attention to keep all the phases balanced and in phase.




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March 27, 2013, 03:48:00 PM
 #435

I could be wrong but I think the power lines in north america are three phase. I think residential homes are broken down into two or more "legs" each leg consisting of 110v to 120v single phase. Two legs can be wired together to power a washing machine or dryer on 220v or 240v. I think there might be a 10 volt variance allowed to allocate for voltage drops accross the wire. If coinhoarder lives in the US, he most likely has a 240v outlet in his basement for a washing machine.

There are two common electrical outlets that I am aware of in north america (I live in Canada). Single phase outlets that run most appliances. consisting of three prongs 110v + neutral + ground. Then the two phase oulet with four prongs. 110v + 110v + neutral + ground. There must be another outlet type for three phase for industrial purposes but I have never seen one.

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March 27, 2013, 04:05:11 PM
 #436

Wow you guys really don't know much about mains power if you think a modern US house is gonna be limited to 9.6kW.

The US standard for "regular" outlets is 120V, but they still run 240V into a most houses, plus a neutral leg which is used to make the 120V circuits.  A lot of the really high current appliances (electric stove, heat pump) are run on 240V circuits, for efficiency and to save on wire cost.

I have one of my "regular" outlets wired up for 240V, and I run my GPU miner on it when it's here.

so excuse my us ignorance, do they have a mixed power supply there where they have a lot of step up transformers from the generators to give 240

or do they have 240 supply mixed in with 110v so dual lines or something

Huh

I believe how it works is the utility's step-down transformer that supplies the house has 3 taps on it, one on each end of the secondary winding (the "legs"), plus a center tap (the "neutral").

To get 120V, you can wire a circuit using one of the two legs against the neutral.  To get 240V, you wire both legs against each other and leave the neutral out.

A typical house has a number of 120V circuits for regular outlets and lights and things, and then some 240V circuits for high current loads like a stove, heat pump, dryer, welder, etc.

By doubling the voltage on the high current circuits, the amperage is halved, so the wires don't need to be sized as large.  The tradeoff being that 240V is more hazardous to work with than 120V.

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March 27, 2013, 04:15:09 PM
 #437

US Breaker Box

Double throws are 220v and have connections to both mains.

Single throws are 110v and only have a connection to 1 main.


So power available in a modern Home is...

120A (50+30+20+20) * 220V = 26.4KW
95A ((20X4)+15) * 110v = 10.450KW

36.85KW * 0.8 = 29.480


So Basically 30KW available to any home across the US, wired correctly.

Plenty of power.

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March 27, 2013, 04:22:29 PM
 #438

US Breaker Box

95A ((20X4)+15) * 110v = 10.450KW


7 * 650w = 4550w or 4.55KW  so basically half his available wattage...if nothing else was run off that service.

I was just trying to point out some possible problems that might come up. I wish everyone the best of luck with this endeavor.

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March 27, 2013, 04:39:02 PM
 #439

US Breaker Box

95A ((20X4)+15) * 110v = 10.450KW


7 * 650w = 4550w or 4.55KW  so basically half his available wattage...if nothing else was run off that service.

I was just trying to point out some possible problems that might come up. I wish everyone the best of luck with this endeavor.

He's running them on 220v  Roll Eyes

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March 27, 2013, 04:49:29 PM
 #440

US Breaker Box

95A ((20X4)+15) * 110v = 10.450KW


7 * 650w = 4550w or 4.55KW  so basically half his available wattage...if nothing else was run off that service.

I was just trying to point out some possible problems that might come up. I wish everyone the best of luck with this endeavor.

He's running them on 220v  Roll Eyes

No...he WILL be hoping he can run them on 220v..it really depends on what powersupply you have...

Just be aware...I posted in this thread because I saw what I felt where some legit questions that had not been addressed by the OP.

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