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Author Topic: This is HUGE: WIKISPEED, first car-maker in the world to accept Bitcoin  (Read 18096 times)
TheBitcoinChemist
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July 24, 2012, 12:25:13 AM
 #41

Huge news, awesome. The bitcoin address is shown in the press release, but doesn't accompany the "bitcoin accepted here" logo elsewhere on the site, as far as I can tell.

I will get this aspect rectified. Will work on it later this evening. Got to get back to the warehouse(s) now.

~Bruno~


Bruno, they have a BitPay account.  If they need any help plugging it into their site, have them contact me right away. 

It's on the main page now.
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July 24, 2012, 12:27:09 AM
 #42

Pretty soon you'll be able to buy a Moller SkyCar for bitcoins!

Those are just toys for the rich.  This wikispeed commuter car does have me interested, though.

They are toys for the rich in imagination and an unlimited appetite for unfulfilled promises and an empty wallet.  For those rich in the usually understood sense and want something that actually flies, there's Cessna, Cirrus, Gulfstream, Lancair, etc.

Someone who wants a 100mpg commuter vehicle can buy a motorcycle today.  Leaps and bounds in automotive technology are unlikely to come from someone barely figuring out how to integrate a door and a roof into a mass production run of their car.

Companies claiming they got hacked and lost your coins sounds like fraud so perfect it could be called fashionable.  I never believe them.  If I ever experience the misfortune of a real intrusion, I declare I have been honest about the way I have managed the keys in Casascius Coins.  I maintain no ability to recover or reproduce the keys, not even under limitless duress or total intrusion.  Remember that trusting strangers with your coins without any recourse is, as a matter of principle, not a best practice.  Don't keep coins online. Use paper wallets instead.
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July 24, 2012, 12:31:52 AM
 #43




Impressive.
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July 24, 2012, 12:37:42 AM
 #44

I have always liked the idea of a modular car.   If a serious market develops, you will have alternative engine and body kits all made mostly interchangeable. 


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July 24, 2012, 01:16:52 AM
 #45

/sub

I see you claim to use SCRUM in a huge distributed team but the paper scrum wall implies you only scrum locally. Did you consider using Kunagi? I would love to show you around in Kunagi (the first steps can be confusing but it all makes sense after minutes) as I find it near perfect as an online solution replacing what I did in my local scrum teams with paper, planning poker cards, …
I would even prefer using Kunagi over paper on a local team.

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July 24, 2012, 01:25:26 AM
 #46

This is great. I really like the fact that it's modular and you can swap pieces around. They should make computers like this. I'm thinking about the Retina MacBook.
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July 24, 2012, 01:26:55 AM
 #47

The question needs to be asked....Could you take the principles used at wikispeed and apply them to aircraft manufacturing ?

Im thinking here of a wikispeed personal aircraft...

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July 24, 2012, 01:35:45 AM
 #48

This is great. I really like the fact that it's modular and you can swap pieces around. They should make computers like this. I'm thinking about the Retina MacBook.


They don't make computers that you can swap pieces?
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July 24, 2012, 01:40:48 AM
 #49

This is great. I really like the fact that it's modular and you can swap pieces around. They should make computers like this. I'm thinking about the Retina MacBook.


They don't make computers that you can swap pieces?

Apple doesn't Tongue.

https://www.bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf
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July 24, 2012, 01:46:41 AM
 #50

Is anyone familiar with the early model Honda Insight? The most fuel-efficient, mass-produced consumer vehicle in history? (Yet?)

Anyone remember the technology that went into making the most fuel efficient consumer car in history?

1.0 liter 3 cylinder engine?
Lean-burn with stoichiometric gas/air ratio of 1/25.8?
Hugely plastic chassis and seats 2 comfortably plus some groceries?
It's a hybrid?
Manual transmission or a CVT?
Looked HORRIBLE as far as appearances went?

So, where the hell is all this stuff on this supposed 100mpg vehicle?
And why aren't they selling it for $150,000+?

I think anyone can tell you the answer to that...

Donations are welcome!
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July 24, 2012, 01:49:13 AM
 #51

This is great. I really like the fact that it's modular and you can swap pieces around. They should make computers like this. I'm thinking about the Retina MacBook.

I guess they just like making them out of solid pieces of aluminium.

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July 24, 2012, 02:07:11 AM
 #52

This is great. I really like the fact that it's modular and you can swap pieces around. They should make computers like this. I'm thinking about the Retina MacBook.

I guess they just like making them out of solid pieces of aluminium.
Have you read Steve Job's biography? It talks about that. He would always insist that the inside look pretty, and that nobody ever see the inside. Look up the NeXT as well.

I recommend asking me for a signature from my GPG key before doing a trade. I will NEVER deny such a request.
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July 24, 2012, 02:09:20 AM
 #53

The first person to buy a car with Bitcoin is totally gonna be more famous than that pizza guy Smiley

My very own Casascius Bearer Bar: 1GCDzqmX2Cf513E8NeThNHxiYEivU1Chhe
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July 24, 2012, 02:38:17 AM
 #54

Is anyone familiar with the early model Honda Insight? The most fuel-efficient, mass-produced consumer vehicle in history? (Yet?)

Anyone remember the technology that went into making the most fuel efficient consumer car in history?

1.0 liter 3 cylinder engine?
Lean-burn with stoichiometric gas/air ratio of 1/25.8?
Hugely plastic chassis and seats 2 comfortably plus some groceries?
It's a hybrid?
Manual transmission or a CVT?
Looked HORRIBLE as far as appearances went?

So, where the hell is all this stuff on this supposed 100mpg vehicle?
And why aren't they selling it for $150,000+?

I think anyone can tell you the answer to that...

The Insight no AC manual tranny is the MPG king but it is real close now.

http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/calculatorSelectEngine.jsp?year=2000&make=Honda&model=Insight

The Insight is 53 combined rating under the new ratings, the Prius C is 51.  The Insight with AC/auto is about 50 mpg under the new ratings.

The high mpg rating (70mpg highway) on the original Insight was done on an easier test. 

The Insight chassis was actually just plastic covered in some spots, it was mostly aluminum and often said to be 'hand assembled' at a loss. 


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July 24, 2012, 02:44:55 AM
 #55

Meanwhile, the Volkswagen Lupo 3L TDI got 78MPG, but was never (as far as I know) available in the US. It had a 3-cylinder turbodiesel with direct injection.

Mining Rig Extraordinaire - the Trenton BPX6806 18-slot PCIe backplane [PICS] Dead project is dead, all hail the coming of the mighty ASIC!
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July 24, 2012, 02:45:24 AM
 #56

The question needs to be asked....Could you take the principles used at wikispeed and apply them to aircraft manufacturing ?

Im thinking here of a wikispeed personal aircraft...

What principles are used at Wikispeed that would help manufacture aircraft better than what we're doing now?

The hardest part of designing an aircraft isn't designing it, 90% of it is passing all the damn tests to get it certified and getting certification on every damn little thing you want to do.  Sadly, a major part of what makes an airplane design "great" is how long it's been flown without any problems, as safety is on more people's minds than features.

Companies claiming they got hacked and lost your coins sounds like fraud so perfect it could be called fashionable.  I never believe them.  If I ever experience the misfortune of a real intrusion, I declare I have been honest about the way I have managed the keys in Casascius Coins.  I maintain no ability to recover or reproduce the keys, not even under limitless duress or total intrusion.  Remember that trusting strangers with your coins without any recourse is, as a matter of principle, not a best practice.  Don't keep coins online. Use paper wallets instead.
the joint
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July 24, 2012, 02:48:38 AM
 #57

Is anyone familiar with the early model Honda Insight? The most fuel-efficient, mass-produced consumer vehicle in history? (Yet?)

Anyone remember the technology that went into making the most fuel efficient consumer car in history?

1.0 liter 3 cylinder engine?
Lean-burn with stoichiometric gas/air ratio of 1/25.8?
Hugely plastic chassis and seats 2 comfortably plus some groceries?
It's a hybrid?
Manual transmission or a CVT?
Looked HORRIBLE as far as appearances went?

So, where the hell is all this stuff on this supposed 100mpg vehicle?
And why aren't they selling it for $150,000+?

I think anyone can tell you the answer to that...

The Insight no AC manual tranny is the MPG king but it is real close now.

http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/calculatorSelectEngine.jsp?year=2000&make=Honda&model=Insight

The Insight is 53 combined rating under the new ratings, the Prius C is 51.  The Insight with AC/auto is about 50 mpg under the new ratings.

The high mpg rating (70mpg highway) on the original Insight was done on an easier test. 

The Insight chassis was actually just plastic covered in some spots, it was mostly aluminum and often said to be 'hand assembled' at a loss. 



Um, maybe the ~1,400 lb. weight helps just a smidge.

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July 24, 2012, 02:51:24 AM
 #58

The question needs to be asked....Could you take the principles used at wikispeed and apply them to aircraft manufacturing ?

Im thinking here of a wikispeed personal aircraft...

What principles are used at Wikispeed that would help manufacture aircraft better than what we're doing now?

The hardest part of designing an aircraft isn't designing it, 90% of it is passing all the damn tests to get it certified and getting certification on every damn little thing you want to do.  Sadly, a major part of what makes an airplane design "great" is how long it's been flown without any problems, as safety is on more people's minds than features.

Here's where you start:
http://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/aircraft_certification/airworthiness_certification/

Sure, it would take capital to do the paperwork, but you can crowdsource the tests to people who are building prototypes along with you.  You each specialize in one area and send parts around.  That's how.

https://www.bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf
While no idea is perfect, some ideas are useful.
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July 24, 2012, 02:59:21 AM
 #59

The question needs to be asked....Could you take the principles used at wikispeed and apply them to aircraft manufacturing ?

Im thinking here of a wikispeed personal aircraft...

What principles are used at Wikispeed that would help manufacture aircraft better than what we're doing now?

The hardest part of designing an aircraft isn't designing it, 90% of it is passing all the damn tests to get it certified and getting certification on every damn little thing you want to do.  Sadly, a major part of what makes an airplane design "great" is how long it's been flown without any problems, as safety is on more people's minds than features.

Here's where you start:
http://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/aircraft_certification/airworthiness_certification/

Sure, it would take capital to do the paperwork, but you can crowdsource the tests to people who are building prototypes along with you.  You each specialize in one area and send parts around.  That's how.

Is there already an existing modular aircraft design ?

casascius
Mike Caldwell
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July 24, 2012, 03:48:28 AM
 #60

The question needs to be asked....Could you take the principles used at wikispeed and apply them to aircraft manufacturing ?

Im thinking here of a wikispeed personal aircraft...

What principles are used at Wikispeed that would help manufacture aircraft better than what we're doing now?

The hardest part of designing an aircraft isn't designing it, 90% of it is passing all the damn tests to get it certified and getting certification on every damn little thing you want to do.  Sadly, a major part of what makes an airplane design "great" is how long it's been flown without any problems, as safety is on more people's minds than features.

Here's where you start:
http://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/aircraft_certification/airworthiness_certification/

Sure, it would take capital to do the paperwork, but you can crowdsource the tests to people who are building prototypes along with you.  You each specialize in one area and send parts around.  That's how.

So the Wikispeed secret is to find qualified unpaid volunteers willing to risk their lives as test pilots all begging to be the first to climb into some untested contraption and hit the throttle?  I could see how this might work for space travel (moon or bust!) but not for a new personal aircraft paradigm.

Companies claiming they got hacked and lost your coins sounds like fraud so perfect it could be called fashionable.  I never believe them.  If I ever experience the misfortune of a real intrusion, I declare I have been honest about the way I have managed the keys in Casascius Coins.  I maintain no ability to recover or reproduce the keys, not even under limitless duress or total intrusion.  Remember that trusting strangers with your coins without any recourse is, as a matter of principle, not a best practice.  Don't keep coins online. Use paper wallets instead.
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