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1  Other / Politics & Society / Re: At what point does Bitcoin become protestable? on: February 09, 2012, 01:17:19 PM
Thread necro by proxy? JA37 is a master. He even got a "filthy libertarian" to do his dirty work!  Grin

Edit: If this post doesn't make any sense, ignore it!

This thread has been dead for long, but that doesn't mean that the original post doesn't have merit. I don't mean for people to keep posting in this thread, but to read the OP and understand why most people would never consider BTC a serious alternative.
2  Economy / Economics / Re: The early-adoptor unfairness on: February 09, 2012, 11:32:28 AM
Fair, unfair, doesn't really matter.
Red wrote a great summary a while ago. https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=48521.0

I personally think that he's spot on. Most people won't care about Bitcoin at all seeing how the vast majority of the coins in existence are in the hands of a tiny minority. I personally have no interest in giving my (real)money to someone who happened to mine a gazillion coins on their PII on blind luck a few years ago.  I mainly hang around here to get a good laugh from the extreme libertarian views one can find in some threads.
3  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Who creates the jobs? on: February 04, 2012, 05:41:11 PM
Actually, small and medium sized companies are creating the most jobs.
Since most of them are not running at full capacity they don't see a reason to hire more people.
They only hire more if they can sell the products.

Are those the companies that get the big tax breaks? It would make sense, wouldn't it?
4  Other / Off-topic / Re: Inside Job (movie) on: January 29, 2012, 12:13:45 AM
Maybe your personal experience differs from mine?

It's irrelevant when it comes to facts. And fact is, we haven't had a free market.

And we never will. Just different masters.
5  Other / Beginners & Help / Re: Submersing a rig on: January 23, 2012, 12:14:13 PM
How about a little love for "Bubbles"? From 1985.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cray-2
6  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Collectivists at it again. on: January 02, 2012, 03:50:47 PM
The education is not free, someone has to pay for it.  Regardless, I have personally seen relatively poor families do very well while homeschooling, and I personally attended a private school that did and does accept students whose parents cannot pay for tuition.  Homeschooling, generally speaking, is a much cheaper option than any other method; including taxpayer supported education.  And with much better results.  Furthermore, one can literally homeschool via an online 'distance learning' program associated with a state funded university for zero personal cost, and the results are similar.  They are often called 'virtual schools'.  So from a certain perspective, the US could literally homeschool every child willing to participate in that manner with a quality and free-to-them education.  Whether or not the results would be competitive to Finland under such circumstances, I would not hazard a guess.

"Free" for the person receiving the education. I'm well aware of how education is funded. As for the poor doing well with homeschooling, would you say that that is the norm, or the exception? Single moms with three kids genreally don't have time to homeschool their kids. Should we just consider those kids screwed and move on?
So your school will admit anyone who shows up at their doorstep, for free? Doesn't sound plausable. That's not a system that will help everyone, just a lucky few.
You have no idea how well virtual schools work, you just assume that it would scale up to any number of participants and somehow be better than how Finland does things? And did you also see how they manage not only to educate their kids, but also make sure that everyone got properly fed so that they could benefit from the education as well?
I'm not saying that this is the best way that will ever be when it comes to education, but compared to everything else right now it looks pretty awsome.
7  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Collectivists at it again. on: January 02, 2012, 07:34:39 AM
This is a useless study.  It compares government school systems to each other, based on arbitrary metrics comparing scores between groups of 15 year olds (an arbitrary age) in testing for arbitrarily chosen subjects.  It would be trivial for any number of different private school systems in the US to crush Finland's numbers.  Average scores for US students in government sponsored schools in the US suck, in part, because everyone knows that they suck so many parents with means don't send their children to government schools, so those government schools suck more.  Compare Finland's scores to say, Covington Latin in Covington, Kentucky or St Francis High School in Downtown Louisville, Kentucky or Highlands Latin School in the Highlands district of Louisville, Kentucky and these scores would be embarressing.  And those three are just a few that I could think of off the top of my head.  For that matter, just comparing Finland's average scoring to the average American homeschooled high school aged student would make a lot of Finnish schoolteachers question the effectiveness of their careers considering what the average, untrained parent educator can do.

Of course the subjects, group and age are arbitrary. How else would you conduct a study if you don't select what you want to study, and who?
So the schools you named, they are attainable to anyone? Without cost to the individual family? Same with homeschooling? I would agree with you that a personal tutor would probably yield better results, but that's not a realistic option. 
Here you have a school that provides education for everyone, on par with the best countries in the world, with less time spent.

Let's see a better system that enables all kids from a low income families to have the same chance as anybody else if they're just willing to work for it, not a system that favours the rich and stacks the deck against the poor.
Unless you're actually suggesting sending all kids in the US to those private schools that "would crush Finland's numbers" for a good and free education.
8  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Collectivists at it again. on: January 01, 2012, 01:19:10 AM
Groups all over the world force bad systems into place. One of them is the best. Not surprising.

Let's hear a better system then? One that has all the benefits of the Finnish system, and then some.

I've heard really good things about Montessori schools, but I'm not sure what benefits you're looking for beyond "the children learn what they need to." What more should a school be obligated to provide?


I've had mixed experience with Montessori methodology. And that's what it is, a methodology, not a school system. You could use Montessori methods in the school system, and I think the Finns do that to some extent. If you read the article you'll see that they focus on educating while playing, something Montessori recognized the importance of very early.
My experience with Montessori is mixed like I said. They do teach some things very well, but they lack others, so moving from Montessori to higher education isn't always trouble free since there's often certain skills missing.
9  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Collectivists at it again. on: January 01, 2012, 12:42:33 AM
Groups all over the world force bad systems into place. One of them is the best. Not surprising.

Let's hear a better system then? One that has all the benefits of the Finnish system, and then some.
10  Other / Politics & Society / Re: How much does investing in education of less fortunate pay off? on: December 31, 2011, 01:58:51 PM
Have a look at the link in this thread.
Seems to pay off pretty well in Finland.
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=56166.0
11  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Collectivists at it again. on: December 31, 2011, 01:57:45 PM
Finland also has a high suicide rate

Not even in the top 10 if you look at wikipedia.
Do you think that has anything to do with the school system?
12  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Collectivists at it again. on: December 31, 2011, 01:38:50 PM
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Since the 1980s, the main driver of Finnish education policy has been the idea that every child should have exactly the same opportunity to learn, regardless of family background, income, or geographic location. Education has been seen first and foremost not as a way to produce star performers, but as an instrument to even out social inequality.

Quote
Like Finland, Norway is small and not especially diverse overall, but unlike Finland it has taken an approach to education that is more American than Finnish. The result? Mediocre performance in the PISA survey.
13  Other / Politics & Society / Collectivists at it again. on: December 31, 2011, 01:34:02 PM
God damn it, they're at it again, those damn collectivists create the best school in the world.

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2011/12/what-americans-keep-ignoring-about-finlands-school-success/250564/
14  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Who creates the jobs? on: December 29, 2011, 09:33:17 AM
That's not strictly true, either.  You have to have capital (wealth) to start a business.  But without demand you will not survive long.  Like I said earlier it's a double-sided coin.

If there's demand, not just a will but also means to buy something, there is capital. Demand is key. Wealth is optional.
15  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Who creates the jobs? on: December 23, 2011, 04:21:47 PM
No you moron, people aren't going to found companies when no one has any money to buy their products. This is the core of the problem. Republicans have been giving tax breaks to the rich and tax hikes to the poor for so long now that the rich have more money than they can ever spend while the poor are forced to buy essentially nothing, which stifles the economy and prevents job growth by decreasing demand for essentially everything.

No need for name-calling. Although I disagree with almost everything b2c writes I think we should try to keep the tone civilized and respect each others viewpoints.
16  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Who creates the jobs? on: December 23, 2011, 12:28:12 PM
Apparently not rich people, according to the article.

Alright, let's see the argument.

Quote
rich people do not create jobs, even if they found and build companies that eventually employ thousands of people

These companies that employ thousands of people aren't creating jobs? Those jobs would exist without those companies? I think not. Nice try.

Keep reading. You almost made it to the interesting part.
17  Other / Off-topic / Re: Inside Job (movie) on: December 22, 2011, 12:58:38 PM
There's always a staggering amount of money lost in illegal activities, but is it really so big that it can cause a crisis? I'm neither an economist nor a police investigator, but the accusation "they stole the money and spent it on drugs and whores" sounds more like sensationalism to get a viewer angry then a real reason for the crisis

That wasn't the reason for the crisis. Go watch the movie. It's an interesting piece of work. The journalist is quite knowledgeable and asks all the right questions.  Smiley
18  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Seriously, though, how would a libertarian society address global warming? on: December 19, 2011, 03:51:10 PM

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Do you still live under the delusion that what you pay and what cost the company have are somehow connected?
Quote
Not in the electric power industry.
But you think that they do in other industries?
Quote
Yes, in less-regulated industries, they do. In a competitive industry, you would generally expect that products that cost less to provide have a lower price.
Interesting that you think that. That's not my experience. You charge what your competitors charge, more or less, depending on how you position yourself. Lower cost to provide means more profit, not lower consumer cost.

Quote
The same is true in the power industry. Large consumers get better deals. You're not a large consumer, so they charge you whatever they can.
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They charge me the price the State compels them to charge. They have no leeway.
Your prices are set by the state? Really? Where do you live? I get to choose which company should exploit me, and they set their prices according to "free market principles" meaning that they collude to skin us all.

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How do you know it's inefficient? The government has successfully managed to create a village that is self sufficient and given incentives to others to break free from the power companies. Yes, it's a shame that the money instead isn't in the pockets of the power companies, where it would do so much more good.  Grin
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I know it's inefficient because if it was efficient, it wouldn't have had to be compelled. If the prices they were getting for electricity were negotiated prices rather than compelled prices, they would be operating at a loss.
They probably would operate at a loss if the prices weren't set by the state. That's because power companies doesn't like competition. They have no incentive to allow this, and every reason to resist it. That doesn't mean that it's inefficient, it just means that power companies like profit.

Quote
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The right way to deal with global warming is to become so smart and rich that we forget it ever even was an issue. This is the same way the human race has solved every problem it's ever solved.
That brings us back to how we find the next Einstein/Beethoven then? How to provide education and a level playing field for all so that everybody can reach their maximum potential. Except we should only look after ourselves, unless we feel a little charitable around Christmas and donate a little to some poor fellow.
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If you're going to do it by forced central command, taking it from one person to give it to someone else, you will almost always wind up doing the opposite of what you want to do. In general, people wind up with money because they are being productive. Forced, centralized redistribution is not the way.
In general people end up with money because they have money. If not forced, centralized redistribution (aka taxation) is the way, then what is?  How do you level the playing field and make everybody reach their full potential? Being born poor is having the deck stacked against you, some overcome that, but most don't.
19  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Seriously, though, how would a libertarian society address global warming? on: December 19, 2011, 02:12:18 PM

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Do you still live under the delusion that what you pay and what cost the company have are somehow connected?
Quote
Not in the electric power industry.
But you think that they do in other industries?

Quote
Here a private company raised their prices because people were using their service, when according to you logic prices should go down. The only connection there is, is when their cost is higher than what they can charge.
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That's not quite what I said. The price to an individual customer should go down as their usage goes up. But higher total usage across all customers will cause prices to rise. It's the same with any other product. If you want to buy 10 Volvos, you can probably negotiate a rock bottom price. But if everyone wants a Volvo, they're all going to pay more.
The same is true in the power industry. Large consumers get better deals. You're not a large consumer, so they charge you whatever they can.

Quote
What I find interesting about the German village discussed is that the Government have actually set a price that the power companies have to buy power back to. Without that law there would be no buyback and no incentives to produce power for small communities. The government is acting as an enabler here, promoting innovation and change.
Quote
Right, but it's promoting inefficient innovation and change. It's not clear that producing power that costs more than people are willing to pay for it is beneficial. Meanwhile, the resources that went to producing this miniscule amount of unprofitable power can't go to other things.
How do you know it's inefficient? The government has successfully managed to create a village that is self sufficient and given incentives to others to break free from the power companies. Yes, it's a shame that the money instead isn't in the pockets of the power companies, where it would do so much more good.  Grin

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Not what people would call libertarian I guess. Let's see a way a libertarian could address global warming, this one wasn't it.
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The right way to deal with global warming is to become so smart and rich that we forget it ever even was an issue. This is the same way the human race has solved every problem it's ever solved.
That brings us back to how we find the next Einstein/Beethoven then? How to provide education and a level playing field for all so that everybody can reach their maximum potential. Except we should only look after ourselves, unless we feel a little charitable around Christmas and donate a little to some poor fellow.
20  Other / Politics & Society / Food for thought on: December 19, 2011, 09:37:42 AM
Seems like the US is in a bad shape. Some crazy numbers right there.
http://www.businessinsider.com/economic-numbers-important-2011-2011-12
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