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Author Topic: MESSAGE FROM GRAVITATE CASH OUT COINS NOW  (Read 6005 times)
wheelz1200
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September 05, 2017, 08:45:29 PM
 #101

I have had all the Microsoul coins I have graded which is adding to the investment made over face value

So am I to crack anacs slabs, peel coins and then what...

If they are empty, I have ruined a coin for nothing, and haven't seen anyone who has got an empty coin getting their funds

If they aren't empty I have needlessly ruined a coin (if they were going to be swept wouldn't they have already?)

This is such a mess



Yeah this would be a good time for gravitate to chime in here.  Vizique seems to have done everything that was asked to get a refund and hasnt gotten any response it seems.  Bad position because if you do crack them like you said, then what....














 

 

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September 05, 2017, 09:18:31 PM
 #102

I have had all the Microsoul coins I have graded which is adding to the investment made over face value

So am I to crack anacs slabs, peel coins and then what...

If they are empty, I have ruined a coin for nothing, and haven't seen anyone who has got an empty coin getting their funds

If they aren't empty I have needlessly ruined a coin (if they were going to be swept wouldn't they have already?)

This is such a mess



If it we're me , I would not crack open a graded coin unless you have it sent back to be reslabbed and the title changed to something that reflects that the coins were nothing but a scam?Huh
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September 05, 2017, 09:19:56 PM
 #103

I was able to generate numerous public addresses from a single private key due to the way they were generated....

What exactly did you mean by this statement?

A private key is just a random 256 bit number.  A private key maps to exactly one point on the specified secp256K1 elliptic curve.  The point on the curve can be expressed in only two ways:  the full form with the full x and y coordinates of the point and the short form with just the x coordinate and a sign bit.

Then these two forms of the point can be encoded into exactly two different Bitcoin addresses.

Are you saying you found a way to get more than the two possible Bitcoin addresses from your private key?

Our family was terrorized by Homeland Security.  Read all about it here:  http://www.jmwagner.com/ and http://www.burtw.com/  Any donations to help us recover from the $300,000 in legal fees and forced donations to the Federal Asset Forfeiture slush fund are greatly appreciated!
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September 05, 2017, 09:38:27 PM
 #104

I was able to generate numerous public addresses from a single private key due to the way they were generated....

What exactly did you mean by this statement?

A private key is just a random 256 bit number.  A private key maps to exactly one point on the specified secp256K1 elliptic curve.  The point on the curve can be expressed in only two ways:  the full form with the full x and y coordinates of the point and the short form with just the x coordinate and a sign bit.

Then these two forms of the point can be encoded into exactly two different Bitcoin addresses.

Are you saying you found a way to get more than the two possible Bitcoin addresses from your private key?


There are 4 options for public keys
Public key
Public key compressed
Public address
Public address compressed

There are 5 private key options

Private key WIF
Privatekey WIF compresses
Private key Hexadecimal
Private key base64
Private key BIP38

All from 1 random 256 bit number
BurtW
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September 05, 2017, 10:35:33 PM
 #105

I was able to generate numerous public addresses from a single private key due to the way they were generated....

What exactly did you mean by this statement?

A private key is just a random 256 bit number.  A private key maps to exactly one point on the specified secp256K1 elliptic curve.  The point on the curve can be expressed in only two ways:  the full form with the full x and y coordinates of the point and the short form with just the x coordinate and a sign bit.

Then these two forms of the point can be encoded into exactly two different Bitcoin addresses.

Are you saying you found a way to get more than the two possible Bitcoin addresses from your private key?


There are 4 options for public keys
Public key
Public key compressed
Public address
Public address compressed

There are 5 private key options

Private key WIF
Privatekey WIF compresses
Private key Hexadecimal
Private key base64
Private key BIP38

All from 1 random 256 bit number

These:

Private key WIF
Privatekey WIF compresses
Private key Hexadecimal
Private key base64
Private key BIP38

are just forms of private keys.  A single private key (a 256 bit random number) can be stored/transported/encoded in one of these forms.

These:

Public key
Public key compressed

Are the two forms of public keys.  A single public key (a single point on the elliptic curve) can be stored/transported/encoded in one of these forms.

These:

Public address
Public address compressed

Are the two forms of Bitcoin addresses that correspond to the two forms of public key above.  A bitcoin address is the check summed triple hash of the corresponding public key.  They do not represent new forms of public keys.  They are hashes of public keys.

In other words:

The private key on the coin will be stored on the coin in exactly one and only one of these forms:

Private key WIF
Privatekey WIF compresses
Private key Hexadecimal
Private key base64
Private key BIP38

You need to decode the private key in the correct form.  There will be only one correct choice.

Then from that one private key you can generate exactly two different forms of the one public key:  compressed or uncompressed.

From these two forms of the one public key you will get exactly two forms of the Bitcoin address.  The compressed public key form will give you the compressed Bitcoin address form and the uncompressed public key form will give you the uncompressed Bitcoin address form.

One private key -> one public key -> two public key forms -> two bitcoin address forms.

Our family was terrorized by Homeland Security.  Read all about it here:  http://www.jmwagner.com/ and http://www.burtw.com/  Any donations to help us recover from the $300,000 in legal fees and forced donations to the Federal Asset Forfeiture slush fund are greatly appreciated!
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September 05, 2017, 11:08:18 PM
 #106

I was able to generate numerous public addresses from a single private key due to the way they were generated....

What exactly did you mean by this statement?

A private key is just a random 256 bit number.  A private key maps to exactly one point on the specified secp256K1 elliptic curve.  The point on the curve can be expressed in only two ways:  the full form with the full x and y coordinates of the point and the short form with just the x coordinate and a sign bit.

Then these two forms of the point can be encoded into exactly two different Bitcoin addresses.

Are you saying you found a way to get more than the two possible Bitcoin addresses from your private key?


There are 4 options for public keys
Public key
Public key compressed
Public address
Public address compressed

There are 5 private key options

Private key WIF
Privatekey WIF compresses
Private key Hexadecimal
Private key base64
Private key BIP38

All from 1 random 256 bit number

These:

Private key WIF
Privatekey WIF compresses
Private key Hexadecimal
Private key base64
Private key BIP38

are just forms of private keys.  A single private key (a 256 bit random number) can be stored/transported/encoded in one of these forms.

These:

Public key
Public key compressed

Are the two forms of public keys.  A single public key (a single point on the elliptic curve) can be stored/transported/encoded in one of these forms.

These:

Public address
Public address compressed

Are the two forms of Bitcoin addresses that correspond to the two forms of public key above.  A bitcoin address is the check summed triple hash of the corresponding public key.  They do not represent new forms of public keys.  They are hashes of public keys.

In other words:

The private key on the coin will be stored on the coin in exactly one and only one of these forms:

Private key WIF
Privatekey WIF compresses
Private key Hexadecimal
Private key base64
Private key BIP38

You need to decode the private key in the correct form.  There will be only one correct choice.

Then from that one private key you can generate exactly two different forms of the one public key:  compressed or uncompressed.

From these two forms of the one public key you will get exactly two forms of the Bitcoin address.  The compressed public key form will give you the compressed Bitcoin address form and the uncompressed public key form will give you the uncompressed Bitcoin address form.

One private key -> one public key -> two public key forms -> two bitcoin address forms.

Where were you when Gravitate was generating private keys.....Huh??
Rmcdermott927
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September 06, 2017, 12:08:55 AM
 #107

I peeled 3 of the Lucky coins....
Not 1 of them had the 0.01BTC on it.... not 1 address matched to what was supposed to be on there.
Each private key was able to generate at least 5 different addresses and none of them matched to what was supposed to be on the coin.....

I also peeled 2x 2013 coins.... private keys did not match hologram addresses nor did the alternate addresses contain any BTC balance.....

Well done gravitate.... you fucked us all pretty good.....  bravo

I remember redeeming my 0.01 a while back.   You may want to try either using a magnifying glass or enlarging a high res photo.    In the font used a lot of characters looked the same.    Im not saying your coins arent empty, because it appears a lot of them have been, but at $45 a pop, it's worth a shot.

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September 06, 2017, 02:06:39 AM
 #108




Viz
This picture clearly shows that the private key starts with a 5 and that is followed by letters and numbers.  This means that the private key is (probably) in the "Wallet Import Format".  This means that the key is base 58 encoded.  This means that the only allowed characters are the following 58 characters:

     123456789ABCDEFGHJKLMNPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijkmnopqrstuvwxyz

Notice that 0 (zero), O (the capital letter O), I (the capital letter I), and l (the small letter l) are all missing.  So your private key will not contain those characters.  Also there is a checksum in the WIP format so if you type the private key into a good private key decoder it will immediately be able to tell if there is an error because the check sum will fail.

Obviously if you see any of the illegal characters then transpose them to legal characters "0" and "O" to "o" for example then try again.  

Assuming you get a good checksum you will then have a valid WIP encoded private key.

Since the encoded private key starts with a 5 it should correspond to an uncompressed public key.  However since there were some issues in the key pair generation and encoding just try both the compressed and uncompressed forms of the public key to form the Bitcoin address.  Does not hurt to try.

The private key you get can give you two different Bitcoin addresses as I stated above.  First try the correct version, the uncompressed version
 (since the private key started with a 5).  If that does not work then with some contortions you can calculate the compressed version of the same public key and the corresponding Bitcoin address. If neither of those is the correct Bitcoin address on the coin then you are out of luck.

Reference:  

https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Wallet_import_format

Our family was terrorized by Homeland Security.  Read all about it here:  http://www.jmwagner.com/ and http://www.burtw.com/  Any donations to help us recover from the $300,000 in legal fees and forced donations to the Federal Asset Forfeiture slush fund are greatly appreciated!
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September 06, 2017, 12:20:29 PM
 #109




Viz

Is this picture from a PBC coin? Try this,

1. write it out in reverse (bottom right- left) (middle right- left)(top right-left)
2. add a 5 on the front
3. Swap the the last 2 digits
4. Swap the 15th digit with the last digit
This is your private key
minerjones
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September 06, 2017, 12:46:18 PM
 #110

I was able to generate numerous public addresses from a single private key due to the way they were generated....

What exactly did you mean by this statement?

A private key is just a random 256 bit number.  A private key maps to exactly one point on the specified secp256K1 elliptic curve.  The point on the curve can be expressed in only two ways:  the full form with the full x and y coordinates of the point and the short form with just the x coordinate and a sign bit.

Then these two forms of the point can be encoded into exactly two different Bitcoin addresses.

Are you saying you found a way to get more than the two possible Bitcoin addresses from your private key?

This is exactly what I am "saying"

Here is private key from Lucky 5.6 coin



Now, here is the correct address and private key:

13DQcF6FwiqNqzN38CP5Ux6KqpfHYv4VCe  /  L4iBNP5mEeoYznpS4Mhwe5ruZTmWWyitK5TyCvrqB7nHd8Yv3L6F

It did have the 0.01BTC as seen here: https://blockchain.info/address/13DQcF6FwiqNqzN38CP5Ux6KqpfHYv4VCe

BUT, shortening the private key at different lengths gave 4 more addresses.

I did this using the blockchain.info wallet import feature

19wcxrL5izN65SqBDaYoXjCuSFRgWPwfxJ  /     L4iBNP5mEeoYznpS4Mhwe5ruZTmWWyitK5TyCvrq
16p1DSBSrhjjtdeKHZJwBuK1Zw4McyEnmw  /  L4iBNP5mEeoYznpS4Mhwe5ruZTmWWyitK5TyCvrqB
1CXRnWL5YNJJT1fERi3YcBb1fcJmEBehTn  /     L4iBNP5mEeoYznpS4Mhwe5ruZTmWWyitK5TyCvrqB7
1KzPnXmb2q32frsXAPxpj9UBNLXRBdKmb2  /   L4iBNP5mEeoYznpS4Mhwe5ruZTmWWyitK5TyCvrqB7n

I was able to duplicate this process in my #4.5 and 3.2 Lucky coins as well

If it's not a SKAM, it's not crypto!!
BurtW
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September 06, 2017, 01:37:55 PM
 #111

I do not know what the heck blockchain.info is doing with the improperly formatted private keys you are entering there but using the "WIF checksum checking" dialog on this page:

http://gobittest.appspot.com/PrivateKey

We find:

L4iBNP5mEeoYznpS4Mhwe5ruZTmWWyitK5TyCvrqB7nHd8Yv3L6F has a valid check sum (2767919C)

L4iBNP5mEeoYznpS4Mhwe5ruZTmWWyitK5TyCvrq
L4iBNP5mEeoYznpS4Mhwe5ruZTmWWyitK5TyCvrqB
L4iBNP5mEeoYznpS4Mhwe5ruZTmWWyitK5TyCvrqB7
L4iBNP5mEeoYznpS4Mhwe5ruZTmWWyitK5TyCvrqB7n

all fail the checksum test as is expected.  All of these should have been rejected as they are not properly formated WIF private keys.

BTW since this starts with an "L" you should use the compressed public key format and the corresponding compressed version of the Bitcoin address, which you did.

ALSO I found that if you use the "Wallet Detail" tab here:

https://www.bitaddress.org/bitaddress.org-v2.4-SHA1-1d5951f6a04dd5a287ac925da4e626870ee58d60.html

It will give you both the compressed and uncompressed bitcoin addresses, which in your case are:

13DQcF6FwiqNqzN38CP5Ux6KqpfHYv4VCe  (compressed)
12X1rVtFnzYAZKskBakfAZYPF4HeqkgUSq   (uncompressed)

And it properly rejects all the incorrectly formatted keys you generated by hacking off the tail of the WIF formatted key.

Our family was terrorized by Homeland Security.  Read all about it here:  http://www.jmwagner.com/ and http://www.burtw.com/  Any donations to help us recover from the $300,000 in legal fees and forced donations to the Federal Asset Forfeiture slush fund are greatly appreciated!
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September 06, 2017, 01:59:38 PM
 #112

Is this picture from a PBC coin? Try this,

1. write it out in reverse (bottom right- left) (middle right- left)(top right-left)
2. add a 5 on the front
3. Swap the the last 2 digits
4. Swap the 15th digit with the last digit
This is your private key

WTF?  Are you serious?  Where did you get that?  Did he screw up printing the private key like that on purpose or by accident?

Our family was terrorized by Homeland Security.  Read all about it here:  http://www.jmwagner.com/ and http://www.burtw.com/  Any donations to help us recover from the $300,000 in legal fees and forced donations to the Federal Asset Forfeiture slush fund are greatly appreciated!
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September 06, 2017, 02:33:22 PM
 #113

Is this picture from a PBC coin? Try this,

1. write it out in reverse (bottom right- left) (middle right- left)(top right-left)
2. add a 5 on the front
3. Swap the the last 2 digits
4. Swap the 15th digit with the last digit
This is your private key

WTF?  Are you serious?  Where did you get that?  Did he screw up printing the private key like that on purpose or by accident?

Yup, on purpose. At least for the specific number I bought this is what I was told would work. I never tried it but it's worth a shot to anyone trying to redeem these coins.  

Edit: Can anyone confirm receiving similar instructions from gravitate? Please post any variations.
wheelz1200
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September 06, 2017, 02:43:56 PM
 #114

Is this picture from a PBC coin? Try this,

1. write it out in reverse (bottom right- left) (middle right- left)(top right-left)
2. add a 5 on the front
3. Swap the the last 2 digits
4. Swap the 15th digit with the last digit
This is your private key

WTF?  Are you serious?  Where did you get that?  Did he screw up printing the private key like that on purpose or by accident?

Yup, on purpose. At least for the specific number I bought this is what I was told would work. I never tried it but it's worth a shot to anyone trying to redeem these coins. 

Holy hell, what?  So he turned the key into a puzzle?  What kind of wizardry is that.  Are you serious?














 

 

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Pistachio
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September 06, 2017, 02:48:24 PM
 #115

Is this picture from a PBC coin? Try this,

1. write it out in reverse (bottom right- left) (middle right- left)(top right-left)
2. add a 5 on the front
3. Swap the the last 2 digits
4. Swap the 15th digit with the last digit
This is your private key

WTF?  Are you serious?  Where did you get that?  Did he screw up printing the private key like that on purpose or by accident?

Yup, on purpose. At least for the specific number I bought this is what I was told would work. I never tried it but it's worth a shot to anyone trying to redeem these coins.  

Holy hell, what?  So he turned the key into a puzzle?  What kind of wizardry is that.  Are you serious?

BHcoin did something kind of similar on their CoA cards. This is for the original PBC coins.

Edit: It didn't seem that weird at the time. If someone stole your coin, they couldn't access the private key without the cipher is what I thought was going on. 
wttbs
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September 06, 2017, 02:52:50 PM
 #116

Is this picture from a PBC coin? Try this,

1. write it out in reverse (bottom right- left) (middle right- left)(top right-left)
2. add a 5 on the front
3. Swap the the last 2 digits
4. Swap the 15th digit with the last digit
This is your private key

WTF?  Are you serious?  Where did you get that?  Did he screw up printing the private key like that on purpose or by accident?

Yup, on purpose. At least for the specific number I bought this is what I was told would work. I never tried it but it's worth a shot to anyone trying to redeem these coins.  

Edit: Can anyone confirm receiving similar instructions from gravitate? Please post any variations.

Nope, never received any of this regarding privkeys. I redeemed several 0.01 coins in the time Clam got popular, all private keys imported in the bitcoin-qt without any problem. Also importered some on blockchain.info without any problem.

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wheelz1200
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September 06, 2017, 02:53:44 PM
 #117

Is this picture from a PBC coin? Try this,

1. write it out in reverse (bottom right- left) (middle right- left)(top right-left)
2. add a 5 on the front
3. Swap the the last 2 digits
4. Swap the 15th digit with the last digit
This is your private key

WTF?  Are you serious?  Where did you get that?  Did he screw up printing the private key like that on purpose or by accident?

Yup, on purpose. At least for the specific number I bought this is what I was told would work. I never tried it but it's worth a shot to anyone trying to redeem these coins.  

Holy hell, what?  So he turned the key into a puzzle?  What kind of wizardry is that.  Are you serious?

BHcoin did something kind of similar on their CoA cards. This is for the original PBC coins.

Edit: It didn't seem that weird at the time. If someone stole your coin, they couldn't access the private key without the cipher is what I thought was going on. 

I dont get it.  Who would want a key pair that is intentionally scrambled for funded coins or unfunded.  Is that publically know for the microsoul coins?  I feel like i missed the memo or something.














 

 

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Pistachio
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September 06, 2017, 03:01:14 PM
 #118

Is this picture from a PBC coin? Try this,

1. write it out in reverse (bottom right- left) (middle right- left)(top right-left)
2. add a 5 on the front
3. Swap the the last 2 digits
4. Swap the 15th digit with the last digit
This is your private key

WTF?  Are you serious?  Where did you get that?  Did he screw up printing the private key like that on purpose or by accident?

Yup, on purpose. At least for the specific number I bought this is what I was told would work. I never tried it but it's worth a shot to anyone trying to redeem these coins.  

Holy hell, what?  So he turned the key into a puzzle?  What kind of wizardry is that.  Are you serious?

BHcoin did something kind of similar on their CoA cards. This is for the original PBC coins.

Edit: It didn't seem that weird at the time. If someone stole your coin, they couldn't access the private key without the cipher is what I thought was going on. 

I dont get it.  Who would want a key pair that is intentionally scrambled for funded coins or unfunded.  Is that publically know for the microsoul coins?  I feel like i missed the memo or something.

Maybe Gravitate screwed up the PBC coin keys and he sent this out with them instead of redoing them. I think there were only a handful of the original coins sold. I trust the person who gave me that cipher and they bought the coin directly from gravitate early on.
wheelz1200
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September 06, 2017, 03:09:14 PM
 #119

This just gets wierder as we go along














 

 

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September 06, 2017, 04:22:08 PM
 #120




Viz

Is this picture from a PBC coin? Try this,

1. write it out in reverse (bottom right- left) (middle right- left)(top right-left)
2. add a 5 on the front
3. Swap the the last 2 digits
4. Swap the 15th digit with the last digit
This is your private key

I don't have the exact sequence but this sounds about what gravitate told me for a funded 1B PBC coin. 

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