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Author Topic: Who is Satoshi Nakamoto?  (Read 101668 times)
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May 15, 2013, 11:42:52 PM
 #281

Satoshi Nakamoto is Sergey briN

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May 17, 2013, 02:47:08 PM
 #282

Heheh, if Jed McCaleb is really Satoshi that would be hilarious. I wonder what the ripplescam.org people would say if he suddenly dumped his bitcoins...

ROI is not a verb, the term you're looking for is 'to break even'.
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May 17, 2013, 08:32:35 PM
 #283

Whoever Satoshi Nakamoto is, he's an amazing mathematician, and truly a visionary.
Why? Because he was familiar with elliptic curve cryptography?

My impression is that Satoshi was not an expert in anything. He was a generalist. He knew just enough about cryptography, programming, economics, and peer-to-peer networks to make Bitcoin.

He needed the cryptography knowledge to know the properties of ECDSA and hashing functions; programming to actually write the code; economics to know there was actually a need for private, unrestricted money; and peer-to-peer networks to know that this was also needed to make Bitcoin robust.

He has a profile on p2pfoundation.org. He has posts from 2009. It seems like it's him (I don't think anyone knew anything about Bitcoin back then, so it's doubtful that it's someone faking him; they'd be faking a nobody (or so they'd think)). http://p2pfoundation.ning.com/profile/SatoshiNakamoto

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May 17, 2013, 09:30:18 PM
 #284

Whoever Satoshi Nakamoto is, he's an amazing mathematician, and truly a visionary.
Why? Because he was familiar with elliptic curve cryptography?

My impression is that Satoshi was not an expert in anything. He was a generalist. He knew just enough about cryptography, programming, economics, and peer-to-peer networks to make Bitcoin.

He needed the cryptography knowledge to know the properties of ECDSA and hashing functions; programming to actually write the code; economics to know there was actually a need for private, unrestricted money; and peer-to-peer networks to know that this was also needed to make Bitcoin robust.

First off, those are distinctly different professional disciplines; so just knowing what he needed to know from each of those disciplines without screwing it up was no small feat.

Furthermore, there is more to Bitcoin than you seem to be aware.  The way the security methods and economic incentives fit together is not simply complex, it's probably perfect.  There are subtle, secondary security features in the protocol that; while not making the 51% attack impossible, do contribute to making it generally unprofitable.  Most of these secondary interactions are not mentioned in the white paper, but were present from very early on, and were not simply added to the protocol later.  Just consider what can be done with blockchain enforcable contracts.


https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Contracts

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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May 17, 2013, 11:02:32 PM
 #285

Quote

First off, those are distinctly different professional disciplines; so just knowing what he needed to know from each of those disciplines without screwing it up was no small feat.

Furthermore, there is more to Bitcoin than you seem to be aware.  The way the security methods and economic incentives fit together is not simply complex, it's probably perfect.  There are subtle, secondary security features in the protocol that; while not making the 51% attack impossible, do contribute to making it generally unprofitable.  Most of these secondary interactions are not mentioned in the white paper, but were present from very early on, and were not simply added to the protocol later.  Just consider what can be done with blockchain enforcable contracts.


https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Contracts


I like that idea, that would be like a public ledger for contracts so any changes made would be seen by the network, but can you imagine a contract written as a system? Programmed right into code, tamper proof from both parties and in effect observed at all times? Smiley that would definitely be interesting.

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May 18, 2013, 07:26:42 PM
 #286

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emDJTGTrEm0&feature=youtu.be

Huh

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May 18, 2013, 07:37:45 PM
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Brillliant.

Dankedan: price seems low, time to sell I think...
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May 18, 2013, 07:57:48 PM
 #288

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First off, those are distinctly different professional disciplines; so just knowing what he needed to know from each of those disciplines without screwing it up was no small feat.

Furthermore, there is more to Bitcoin than you seem to be aware.  The way the security methods and economic incentives fit together is not simply complex, it's probably perfect.  There are subtle, secondary security features in the protocol that; while not making the 51% attack impossible, do contribute to making it generally unprofitable.  Most of these secondary interactions are not mentioned in the white paper, but were present from very early on, and were not simply added to the protocol later.  Just consider what can be done with blockchain enforcable contracts.


https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Contracts


I like that idea, that would be like a public ledger for contracts so any changes made would be seen by the network, but can you imagine a contract written as a system? Programmed right into code, tamper proof from both parties and in effect observed at all times? Smiley that would definitely be interesting.

Mostly these are implicit contracts, managed by the electronic devices doing the interaction on behalf of users.  I'd wager that not one in 10K will really know or care how their cell phone can incrementally pay for petrol in bitcoins without a need for trusting either party.  When you drive up to a gas pump and call the attendant for a self service cash fill up, he has to trust that you will come in to pay afterwards, and not drive off.  If you walk in and pay cash up front, you have to trust that they will give you any change back.   But both of these things require that a human observer oversee the business's side of the transaction.  However, people do like the convenence of driving up to a pump and using a credit card at the pump.  So does the company.  With contracts, this is possible using bitcoins, entirely without a human observer making any such decisions to prevent drive offs.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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May 18, 2013, 08:14:45 PM
 #289


Is this the same guy who posted on his blog the same thing a month ago?  If not, this guy is going to be very disappointed that he was not the first to make this connection.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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May 18, 2013, 08:22:57 PM
 #290

But that just gives control of the spigot over to the operator instead of the contract owner that employs the operator. The station would be more secure with any petroleum dispensing equip. The convenience is beneficial when people can eventually use bona fide credit addresses and be verified to pump in a second, and refunded the remainder into the credit address before you leave the driveway.  Your PDA would let you know this was all network-processed and you feel secure you have the money back in your wallet.

With improvements in POS network reliability and redundancy, I could easily feel safer with cc in BTCs or whatever than VISA or MasterCard.  So that's more like a cash wallet, and less like a bank issue, which we would also still hold because that's how we access our market books, etc. But as a service, the insured banks and lenders might be looking forward to offering services they can make a profit on in the realm of cryptocurrency, which is not even in the spell-check yet, so we will see how far it has yet to go still.

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May 18, 2013, 09:54:09 PM
 #291


Is this the same guy who posted on his blog the same thing a month ago?  If not, this guy is going to be very disappointed that he was not the first to make this connection.
No,but who is Shinichi Mochizuki?

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May 18, 2013, 10:46:52 PM
 #292


The beginning of that video sounds exactly like an ad... his voice just has that quality to it.

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May 18, 2013, 11:52:27 PM
 #293

Dude, even if Mochizuki is not Satoshi, one thing is for sure: this man is a great storyteller...  Roll Eyes


No,but who is Shinichi Mochizuki?

Read this... incredible

http://projectwordsworth.com/the-paradox-of-the-proof/
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May 19, 2013, 04:38:53 AM
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But that just gives control of the spigot over to the operator instead of the contract owner that employs the operator. The station would be more secure with any petroleum dispensing equip.

What?  No it doesn't.  There need not be an operator at all.

Go back and read # 7 again.  Keep doing it until you grok it.

https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Contracts

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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May 19, 2013, 05:15:28 AM
 #295

Dude, even if Mochizuki is not Satoshi, one thing is for sure: this man is a great storyteller...  Roll Eyes


No,but who is Shinichi Mochizuki?

Read this... incredible

http://projectwordsworth.com/the-paradox-of-the-proof/

That's interesting. And it could fit into how Satoshi has done his work, but I think whoever Satoshi is, it should be left alone. What's the need to know who created Bitcoin, except for satisfying our mortal curosity.
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May 19, 2013, 11:36:11 AM
 #296

They are some parallels between
Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of Bitcoin and
Vinced, the creator of Namecoin.
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=9552
He could be the same person.

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May 19, 2013, 12:50:13 PM
 #297

http://qz.com/86255/the-mysterious-creator-of-bitcoin-could-be-japanese-mathematician-shinichi-mochizuki-says-the-inventor-of-hypertext/


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Bitcoin’s creator is Japanese mathematician Shinichi Mochizuki, says hypertext inventor

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May 19, 2013, 12:51:59 PM
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http://qz.com/86255/the-mysterious-creator-of-bitcoin-could-be-japanese-mathematician-shinichi-mochizuki-says-the-inventor-of-hypertext/


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Bitcoin’s creator is Japanese mathematician Shinichi Mochizuki, says hypertext inventor


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Ted Nelson, the American academic who in 1963 coined the term hypertext, and is therefore viewed as one of the World Wide Web’s founding fathers, just released a 12-minute video with a big reveal at the end: The inventor of bitcoin, says Nelson, is probably Japanese mathematician Shinichi Mochizuki.

Nelson offers no direct evidence for his conclusion that Shinichi Mochizuki is behind the pseudonymous creator of bitcoin, Satoshi Nakamoto. Instead, in his eccentric way, he offers plausible circumstantial evidence about his theory, outlined below. Internet surfers and the press are bound to investigate furiously.

1. Mochizuki is the kind of genius who could create bitcoin. Whoever created Bitcoin has the intellectual might of Isaac Newton, says Nelson. Mochizuki’s work as a mathematician has cracked some of the simplest and toughest problems in his field, attracting global media coverage.

2. Mochizuki, like the creator of bitcoin, is fond of dropping brilliant works on the internet and stepping back. Bitcoin was released by a pseudonymous programmer (or programmers) under the name Satoshi Nakamoto, who then disappeared from the internet. Nelson compares this to Mochizuki’s style of delivering his work not through academic journals, but simply by dropping it on the internet and walking away. (Notably, this is one area where Nelson gets his bitcoin history wrong: Satoshi Nakamoto didn’t just drop bitcoin onto the internet and disappear. He, she or they, engaged with the community for some time over chat and email before disappearing.)

3. Mochizuki could easily have written all the correspondence associated with Satoshi Nakamoto. Despite being a Japanese professor at a Japanese university, Mochizuki’s English must be quite good, says Nelson, because he was the salutatorian of his graduating class at Princeton, and he completed his undergraduate education in only three years. (Nelson doesn’t note this, but it’s reasonable to expect that Mochizuki is actually a native English speaker; he moved to the US with his parents when he was only five years old.)

It’s worth noting that at least one expert in the cryptographic aspects of bitcoin doesn’t believe Nelson’s theory. Here’s Ryan Lackey, creator of Sealand, the world’s first data haven, refuting Nelson’s video:

♫ This situation, which side are you on? Are you getting out? Are you dropping bombs? Have you heard of diplomatic resolve? ♫ How To Run A Cheap Full Bitcoin Node For $19 A Year ♫ If I knew where it was, I would take you there. There’s much more than this. ♫ Track Your Bitcoins Value
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May 19, 2013, 02:39:28 PM
 #299

There was a good discussion.
http://www.reddit.com/r/Bitcoin/comments/1ekwn3/i_think_i_know_who_satoshi_is/

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May 19, 2013, 11:53:13 PM
 #300

Satoshi is a made-up name, meant to misdirect. Bitcoin is really an experiment into currency weapons meant to give an alternative to the almighty Dollar and the control of the FED/bankers over the international trade. It can and might be used to retaliate against the US and quantitative easing.

Satoshi is an offshoot from China's secret experimentations, and Bitcoin is being used to destabilize the stranglehold of the US. China is slowly easing Bitcoins into mainstream via regular controlled channels (news / documentary) while making sure it owns most of the economy itself too (ASICMINER...)
And of course, as there is about 1Million BTC associated with Satoshi Nakamoto, this will make them incredibly powerful when the time comes to drop the curtain. There is strategy in not running a parallel race to the US - China took the technology, the manufacturing, and soon will take a hold of the currency system and then will assume the role of new central player in the world, likely buying their way into domination.
All the while laughing at everyone looking for a "japanese" Satoshi Nakamoto (China despises Japan).

Who Is Satoshi?
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