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Author Topic: Silk Road: anonymous marketplace. Feedback requested :)  (Read 143634 times)
Inaba
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April 26, 2011, 07:53:02 PM
 #201

How, exactly, would the weapons be transferred to the buyer?  Assuming we are speaking of illegal/restricted weapons.  Mailing them would be an exceptionally bad idea, because it's pretty obvious what's in the carton/crate, whereas sending drugs via mail, the x-ray doesn't look like much... but it's hard to disguise a weapon and lots of weapon parts.

If you're searching these lines for a point, you've probably missed it.  There was never anything there in the first place.
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Modoki
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April 26, 2011, 08:27:02 PM
 #202

Well, I'd send it in like 3 envelopes disguised with some layers of aluminum foil. The ammunition should be multiple times vac sealed.
I guess that'd work.
Greets, M
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April 26, 2011, 10:50:03 PM
 #203

and how many envelopes would AK-47 require? Grin
Jered Kenna (TradeHill)
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April 27, 2011, 12:01:11 AM
 #204

I honestly don't think you'd have that much of a problem mailing it.
If you're talking about domestic then you'd probably be fine.
International would be a bigger issue.

I'm not suggesting it or basing this off anything I can link to.

Also you have to realize the only part that is illegal to mail without the FFL is the lower receiver as far as I know.
I could be wrong on that but I think you could send everything else fine, also I don't think you need an FFL to mail ammo but have never looked in to it, maybe it's a big deal.
I would guess 99+% chance it gets there no problem domestically. Just a guess though.

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FatherMcGruder
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April 27, 2011, 01:41:27 AM
 #205

Also, I would like to tell that fraud CC's aren't really harming the single person who owns the CC, but rather the CC company as most of them give you back your stolen money. Friend of mine just got stolen 2400€ via his CC and he got it all back pretty easy (sic!)
Greets, M
Lol where does the CC company get the money to reimburse you with? They get it from the fees that their customers pay. In other words, the customers pay for the fraud and as such experience harm.

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Mike Caldwell
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April 27, 2011, 06:02:07 AM
 #206

Also, I would like to tell that fraud CC's aren't really harming the single person who owns the CC, but rather the CC company as most of them give you back your stolen money. Friend of mine just got stolen 2400€ via his CC and he got it all back pretty easy (sic!)
Greets, M
Lol where does the CC company get the money to reimburse you with? They get it from the fees that their customers pay. In other words, the customers pay for the fraud and as such experience harm.

Knowing someone who works for a prominent data forensics firm, I am frequently told this:  If the CC companies can figure out how the card numbers got stolen (e.g. in a data breach or something), they will brazenly recoup their losses by tapping the credit card income of the merchant they consider responsible for the breach, until the losses are covered.  And they are fairly good at figuring out who to blame, simply by using algorithms that look for common points of purchase among cards that have been stolen.  They can usually nail it right down to the specific gas pump, or the specific web site, or the specific terminal that got hacked.  A five, six, or seven figure loss is very unwelcome to any small business, and the credit card companies couldn't care less if the business gets wiped out in the process.

They use that so-called "PCI DSS Compliance Questionnaire" to seal the deal.  Every merchant must certify themselves as PCI Compliant to avoid paying hefty fees, and that self-certification pretty much buries them in the event of a breach.  The rationale goes like this: "You certified that you do XYZ to protect CC#'s, clearly you did not, so all losses from this breach are your fault."

Someone suggested that CC theft is somehow OK because you're stealing from a bank, not an individual.  I would submit that stealing from a bank is still stealing and isn't somehow more justified just because they are a bank.  It is one thing to take a position that the war on drugs is a victimless non-crime, an ineffective misallocation of resources, an intrusion upon the freedom of adults.  It's yet another to start up a free-for-all that enables things like fraud and theft - things that are unmistakably criminal and detrimental to society - or makes things like weapons available to violent criminals and the mentally ill.

Companies claiming they got hacked and lost your coins sounds like fraud so perfect it could be called fashionable.  I never believe them.  If I ever experience the misfortune of a real intrusion, I declare I have been honest about the way I have managed the keys in Casascius Coins.  I maintain no ability to recover or reproduce the keys, not even under limitless duress or total intrusion.  Remember that trusting strangers with your coins without any recourse is, as a matter of principle, not a best practice.  Don't keep coins online. Use paper wallets instead.
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April 27, 2011, 06:17:44 AM
 #207

or makes things like weapons available to violent criminals and the mentally ill.
How about making things like weapons available at all?
I live in a country where you need a firearms license to purchase airsoft guns, ffs

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FreeMoney
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April 27, 2011, 06:21:31 AM
 #208

Also, I would like to tell that fraud CC's aren't really harming the single person who owns the CC, but rather the CC company as most of them give you back your stolen money. Friend of mine just got stolen 2400€ via his CC and he got it all back pretty easy (sic!)
Greets, M
Lol where does the CC company get the money to reimburse you with? They get it from the fees that their customers pay. In other words, the customers pay for the fraud and as such experience harm.

Knowing someone who works for a prominent data forensics firm, I am frequently told this:  If the CC companies can figure out how the card numbers got stolen (e.g. in a data breach or something), they will brazenly recoup their losses by tapping the credit card income of the merchant they consider responsible for the breach, until the losses are covered.  And they are fairly good at figuring out who to blame, simply by using algorithms that look for common points of purchase among cards that have been stolen.  They can usually nail it right down to the specific gas pump, or the specific web site, or the specific terminal that got hacked.  A five, six, or seven figure loss is very unwelcome to any small business, and the credit card companies couldn't care less if the business gets wiped out in the process.

They use that so-called "PCI DSS Compliance Questionnaire" to seal the deal.  Every merchant must certify themselves as PCI Compliant to avoid paying hefty fees, and that self-certification pretty much buries them in the event of a breach.  The rationale goes like this: "You certified that you do XYZ to protect CC#'s, clearly you did not, so all losses from this breach are your fault."

Someone suggested that CC theft is somehow OK because you're stealing from a bank, not an individual.  I would submit that stealing from a bank is still stealing and isn't somehow more justified just because they are a bank.  It is one thing to take a position that the war on drugs is a victimless non-crime, an ineffective misallocation of resources, an intrusion upon the freedom of adults.  It's yet another to start up a free-for-all that enables things like fraud and theft - things that are unmistakably criminal and detrimental to society - or makes things like weapons available to violent criminals and the mentally ill.

Sounds like good reason not to use CC companies as a merchant.

Play Bitcoin Poker at sealswithclubs.eu. We're active and open to everyone.
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April 27, 2011, 06:23:52 AM
 #209

http://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=6232.0
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April 27, 2011, 06:26:51 AM
 #210

or makes things like weapons available to violent criminals and the mentally ill.
How about making things like weapons available at all?
I live in a country where you need a firearms license to purchase airsoft guns, ffs

Do the "bad guys" need a license to carry firearms, too ?

If you don't own the private keys, you don't own the coins.
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April 27, 2011, 06:56:58 AM
 #211

Quote
...If the CC companies can figure out how the card numbers got stolen (e.g. in a data breach or something), they will brazenly recoup their losses by tapping the credit card income of the merchant they consider responsible for the breach, until the losses are covered...

Sounds like good reason not to use CC companies as a merchant.

Not to defend the CC companies, but use of Bitcoin is just as vulnerable... What's the difference between an e-commerce outfit losing wallet.dat versus a bunch of CC numbers?  Either way, they're screwed

Companies claiming they got hacked and lost your coins sounds like fraud so perfect it could be called fashionable.  I never believe them.  If I ever experience the misfortune of a real intrusion, I declare I have been honest about the way I have managed the keys in Casascius Coins.  I maintain no ability to recover or reproduce the keys, not even under limitless duress or total intrusion.  Remember that trusting strangers with your coins without any recourse is, as a matter of principle, not a best practice.  Don't keep coins online. Use paper wallets instead.
gusti
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April 27, 2011, 07:12:03 AM
 #212

Quote
...If the CC companies can figure out how the card numbers got stolen (e.g. in a data breach or something), they will brazenly recoup their losses by tapping the credit card income of the merchant they consider responsible for the breach, until the losses are covered...

Sounds like good reason not to use CC companies as a merchant.

Not to defend the CC companies, but use of Bitcoin is just as vulnerable... What's the difference between an e-commerce outfit losing wallet.dat versus a bunch of CC numbers?  Either way, they're screwed

The difference is that transactions are final, not reversible, and you will not be screwed by any bank or CC company.
You only need to secure your wallet/s and you are ok.

If you don't own the private keys, you don't own the coins.
deadlizard
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April 27, 2011, 10:02:02 AM
 #213

or makes things like weapons available to violent criminals and the mentally ill.
How about making things like weapons available at all?
I live in a country where you need a firearms license to purchase airsoft guns, ffs

Do the "bad guys" need a license to carry firearms, too ?
exactly my point. There is no way to discriminate therefore you always take the risk of selling to violent criminals.
but the idea was that it's o.k to sell drugs because the laws are stupid
But in some places all forms of self protection are illegal. Isn't that equally as stupid?

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gusti
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April 27, 2011, 12:56:33 PM
 #214

or makes things like weapons available to violent criminals and the mentally ill.
How about making things like weapons available at all?
I live in a country where you need a firearms license to purchase airsoft guns, ffs

Do the "bad guys" need a license to carry firearms, too ?
exactly my point. There is no way to discriminate therefore you always take the risk of selling to violent criminals.
but the idea was that it's o.k to sell drugs because the laws are stupid
But in some places all forms of self protection are illegal. Isn't that equally as stupid?

I mean, the licensing restrictions is for the good guys, people like you and me.
What happens when I need to defend my property, my family ?
Without weapons, do I have to trust the 911 ? 

If you don't own the private keys, you don't own the coins.
BitterTea
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April 30, 2011, 05:17:40 AM
 #215

A friend of mine has been following the discussion regarding SilkRoad and decided to check it out. He emailed me this blurb from the "new listing" page.

Quote
Restrictions
Please do not list forged documents including fake ids, passports, and counterfeit currency.
Please do not list anything who's purpose is to harm or defraud, such as stolen credit cards, assassinations, and weapons of mass destruction (chemical/bio weaponry, nukes, and anything used to make them).
* See below for details

* These restrictions are in place for both practical and idealogical reasons.

Practically speaking, there are many powerful adversaries of Silk Road and if we are to survive, we must not take them all on at once. Additionally, if you try to please everyone, you will wind up pleasing no one. So certain things are restricted just so we don't scare too many off.

On a moral level, we take the high road, pun intended Wink. Those who seek to control the behavior of their neighbors through force are immoral. Silk Road exists to circumvent that force and provide a safe-haven where civilized people can come together in peace for mutual benefit. To allow listings of items designed to defraud or harm innocent people would be to stoop to the level of the very people we are standing up to.

If you are unsure about a listing, just drop us a line and we'll let you know.
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May 07, 2011, 12:57:16 AM
 #216

Quote
...If the CC companies can figure out how the card numbers got stolen (e.g. in a data breach or something), they will brazenly recoup their losses by tapping the credit card income of the merchant they consider responsible for the breach, until the losses are covered...

Sounds like good reason not to use CC companies as a merchant.

Not to defend the CC companies, but use of Bitcoin is just as vulnerable... What's the difference between an e-commerce outfit losing wallet.dat versus a bunch of CC numbers?  Either way, they're screwed

Either way they are, but the long term damage would be worse out of CC, because it's not an immediate loss to the company who got hacked, but is an image loss as they put their customers at stake. - OK, solution 2.0a; move town or change name.
wallet.dat file would represent damage to the store alone, not their customers.
LeonGeeste
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May 07, 2011, 08:37:24 PM
 #217

Silk road is down now, I haven't gotten to see what it looks like when functional.
mewantsbitcoins
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May 07, 2011, 08:46:52 PM
 #218

It's working OK for me.
There are short outages sometimes, but it's usually more to do with Tor itself than SilkRoad.
Try again
LeonGeeste
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May 07, 2011, 08:48:51 PM
 #219

It's working OK for me.
There are short outages sometimes, but it's usually more to do with Tor itself than SilkRoad.
Try again

It says:

"The Silk Road is currently closed to new visitors. This will be reviewed on May 1st and the site will possibly be reopened. Sorry for the inconvenience Sad "

Am I supposed to access it through TOR or something?
mewantsbitcoins
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May 07, 2011, 08:50:42 PM
 #220

 Grin
Yes. http://ianxz6zefk72ulzz.onion/
While you're there you may also wanna visit the hidden wiki http://kpvz7ki2v5agwt35.onion/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
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