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821  Economy / Economics / Re: Peter Schiff on Bitcoin on: June 28, 2013, 12:06:35 AM

In short, there can be heavy deflation before the onset of hyperinflation. This Schiff does not take into account.


This is, almost word for word, Mish's complaint with Schiff and other hyperinflationists today.

http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2011/05/hyperinflation-nonsense-in-multiple.html
http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2012/08/reader-questions-on-hyperinflation.html
822  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 27, 2013, 10:05:48 PM

http://www.ted.com/talks/taylor_wilson_my_radical_plan_for_small_nuclear_fission_reactors.html

This late guy really got me you know. He's like 21? Watch the whole video. It worths it.


Great kid, very smart.  But that isn't an original idea.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toshiba_4S

No, it's a bit different. The idea is to use depleted nuclear waste (ie: plutonium) together with its relevant salt (ie: Ca or Na). The metal forces the nuclear waste to form a high temperature which in a few minutes turns the salt to its liquid form. The heat continues on and a Stirling device converts the produced heat to energy via adiabatic process thus not losing energy. The reactor can go on for as long as 30 years...!


Nope, not a new idea.  The 4S was specificly designed to run unattended for 30 year refueling cycles, and is quite capable of utilizing downgraded weapons fuel.  It can also use a Strirling engine at the surface generator house, although it's actually desinged to use a liquid salt to boiling water heat exchanger.  Stirling engines are more efficient, but they are also more expensive to build, so the 4S can do either.  The early test version, such as may eventually be built for Alaska, assumes that the waste heat is used for municipal hot water distric heating.  This is more commonly called 'cogeneration' and the total energy efficientyc is much greater than that of a Stirling engine producing electrical power alone.  And the 4S is just one example of this style of small, unattended reactor design, other companies have similar designs.  Another design that aims towards similar ends, but uses a classic deep pool unpressurized light water design is the SLOWPOKE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SLOWPOKE_reactor), intended primarily for municipal district heating and is largely incapable of electric power geneartion because it niether operates at a high enough carnot efficiency to use a stirling nor is it designed to biol water for pressure, since it's an open top design exposed to atmostphere at the top and boiling water is used as super-critical limiting feature in the core.  It's literally impossible to 'meltdown' the core in this one, because it depends upon the presence of a precise amount of water in the core space for the proper regulation of neutron flux, and either the presence of steam bubbles, or the pressence of normal air (in the event of pool water boil-off) permits too much neutron flux to escape the core to maintain a critical reaction.
823  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 27, 2013, 06:00:37 PM

http://www.ted.com/talks/taylor_wilson_my_radical_plan_for_small_nuclear_fission_reactors.html

This late guy really got me you know. He's like 21? Watch the whole video. It worths it.


Great kid, very smart.  But that isn't an original idea.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toshiba_4S
824  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Capitalism. on: June 27, 2013, 05:22:07 AM
Most of what is "public" is less public than the private open spaces.
Some have suggested that Nixon's "environmental movement" took vast amounts of private land for the government away from the owners for environmental reasons, and essentially so that they minerals and oil and trees could be sold to back the national debt, when we left Bretton Woods.
So ironically, the more that is public, the more funding there is for the war engines.

All that federally "owned" land, particularly out west, is the perfect example of the American form of communism.  Undeveloped land is the most basic of resources, required for any form of industrial production I can think of.  By definition, communism is public ownership of the means of production.  There has never been any claim that those resources actually need to be in production to qualify for the definition.
825  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 27, 2013, 04:23:34 AM
But who's going to scoop up the salt and put it back in the Pacific?  Or do we want to desalinate the oceans too?

Don't be so pessimistic, this is a good idea.

The real answer is we won't put it back, instead we'll collect it sell it on an exchange, create demand by promoting consumption and call it money. We can start a forum called sodiumtalk.org and blog about how it is the future of money.

And the past of money.  There is a reason we have the term, "not worth his salt".
826  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 27, 2013, 04:21:19 AM
This has now become an interesting conversation!
Not really.

All of that infrastructure and land for a measly 200 MW is insane. Even if it was 2 GW that would hardly be worth the effort.

And that is exactly my point.  200 MW is hardly worth the effort of all that geoengineering.  Despite the fact that it would pay economic and ecological dividends, both in actual power and in local climate mitigation, for 10K years or more.  We simply don't, as humans, think out that far.  We discount the value of such a massive construction to our great-to-the-power-of-whatever-grandchildren.  If we can't get a net positive return on investment within out own lifetimes, we don't see the value in it.  This is the short term thinking that afflicts the human race with some of it's greatest flaws.  There is a 'food forest' in Vietnam that has produced food for humans for 300+ years, almost without human labor to maintain it.  There is a theory that the Great Pyramid in Giza was not a burial site at all, but an elaborate water works construction; from an age prior to the Egyption culture when the local climate was much wetter.

http://atlaspub.20m.com/giza/pg5.htm

http://sentinelkennels.com/Research_Article_V41.html

http://www.thepump.org/

BAsicly a massive ram pump, used to send the water of the "Upper Nile" (which no longer exists) great distances.  A similar 'ram pump' construction was once proposed to push a portion of the water flowwing down the Mississippi River West across the Great Plains, although today the Mississippi River basin has enough trouble maintaining a shipping depth.

Humanity just has real problems thinking in such long range terms, even when the benefit to our decendents is certain.  One reason that a space elevator is never going to be built.
827  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Capitalism. on: June 27, 2013, 04:00:51 AM


So you imagine the future with a radically different sociopolitical structure, but you imagine everything in it will be the same as things are now? Why not:
- Public transportation replaced with suspended rails going through the city and country, with pods, that you can rent, automatically traveling under them to preset destinations (patented idea, replaces road maintenance with something much cheaper).



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SkyTran


Quote
Subscriptions to road areas in the same way that you can buy a London metro ticket that gives you free ride within limited areas.



http://www.septa.org/fares/pass/independence.html

BTW, roads were never public land or publicly maintained before the foundation of the USPS, which provided funds and legal status for the public development of "postal roads".  Today, all roads are postal roads.  Makes one wonder how we ever had roads before the USPS.

Quote
Personal VTOL aircraft to avoid roads altogether, flown with GPS and computer avoidance assistance.

http://matternet.us/

http://www.incrediblehlq.com/

Quote
- Community supported and sponsored parks, with gardens grown by shared owners or even produce by companies that want to show off their designer fruits and vegetables.


http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/travel/destinations/10great/2009-09-03-apple-farms_N.htm

http://www.huberwinery.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GE_Consumer_%26_Industrial#Appliance_Park

GE's appliance park was the original 'industrial park'.  How did it get it's name, might you ask?  From the 50 acres of company maintained parkspace on the East side of the employee parking lot provided to the public free of charge.  Eventually the city parks department took over maintaince of the privately owned park, and since then portions have been sold off to other companies; so little of the original park remains, but my point is that we used to do things this way.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biltmore_Estate

The Biltmore estate is ran as a private park, but there is some fees depending upon what exactly you want to do.  Walking the gardens is still free.  And yes, it's still privately owned.

http://bernheim.org/

Berhiem Forest is a private park of huge proportions in Kentucky that is as large as many state parks.  It was priavely oned once, and now it's owned and maintained by a fountation that the original owner stipulated in his will shall forever be a public park, and shall forever be free to access.  The Bernhiem foundation does receive some state tax funds indirectly via state agriculture education subsidies, as it's the primary location for aborists to study in Kentucky.  True to their word, all of the forest is hike accessible during daylight summer hours; but there are portions that are so difficult to access, no one besides the arborists are known to have ventured there in years.

My point is this, we can and often do these very public things privately today.  Whether or not these privately owned public spaces accept public funds today or not, they aren't dependent on the support, or likley even the existance, of the state.
828  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 27, 2013, 03:36:14 AM
But who's going to scoop up the salt and put it back in the Pacific?  Or do we want to desalinate the oceans too?

This has now become an interesting conversation!

What about making a huge direct solar desalination plant at the output of the drainage - Then we don't mess with the humidity of the region or effect weather at all... and could pipe clean water somewhere...



Like Los Vegas? Nah, they don't really need drinking water that bad.
829  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 27, 2013, 03:35:04 AM
But who's going to scoop up the salt and put it back in the Pacific?  Or do we want to desalinate the oceans too?

Who cares?  How do you think the salt flats got that way to begin with?  It was once much like the Dead Sea.
830  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 27, 2013, 12:48:50 AM
For that matter, one solution is to build caissons on the ocean floor and use power during the day to pump water out and air in to these giant caissons. When you later need that power back out, you start letting water in which pumps air out at very high pressure, driving a generator. Voila, constant power as needed.

Another solution would be to build huge culverts to funnel the Pacific Ocean from San Diego to the Salt Flats, which happens to be about 200' below sea level and was an inland sea itself that finally dried up a few thousand years ago.  A few water turbines near the Salt Flats, and with the evaporation rate of the area, easily 100 Megawatts or more for as long as we like.  More, if we decide that an inland sea would be a good thing to have there.  It would alter the immediate environment, increasing humidity, cloud cover, and rainfall for several hundred miles around.

Not that the NIMBY crowd would let something like that happen either.
Yeah, that's the main issue there. You can also do that with large bays that have a narrow inlet.

You're talking about tidal power generation, I'm not here.  Still, tidal generation is an excellent example of what I'm talking about.  The few naturally occurring ideal places to put a tidal generator are all owned by people who don't want you to touch their ocean view.  They don't want you blocking their yachts from entering or exiting the bay either.  And the environmentalists don't want you to alter the shape of other coastlines, even if the benefits could possiblely outweight the massive costs of construction work on any foreseeable timescale.

What I was taliking about was literally a controlled drain of the PAcific Ocean into the saltflats.  No dependency on weather patterns or the orbit of the moon.  24/7 power generation so long as the output water was at or lower than the average evaporation rate of Death VAlley, which is considerable.  Power forever, literally, so long as the pipes and gensets are maintained; in the same sense that most hydroelectric plants are power forever, so long as they are not damaged and the run of the river remains the same.  Difference only in which direction is the source and sink.  Again, it will never happen.  NIMBY all but garrantees that large scale geoengineering projects are imposssible, no matter the cost/benefit analysis of it all.
831  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Capitalism. on: June 26, 2013, 07:40:40 PM

I am often prevented from taking personal posession of public property by capitalists and cops.
New boss, old boss. wage slavery, abject poverty or luck and access to resources. These three options are all capitalism offers.

That's not capitalism.  That's communism.

And around and around we go, where we stop, nobody knows.
832  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Capitalism. on: June 26, 2013, 07:36:42 PM
Those bitter little PMs you sent my way are all the reward i need Grin   

I haven't a stance.  Maybe that's why its vague to you?

I don't have the answers to "the way things ought to be" and yet am deeply curious about those who do.  So here I am bemused by your random potshots apropos of nothing, but not at all enlightened by them.  
All you have taught me yet is that "the way things ought to be" would include fewer folks inclined to behave like yourself.  So lets pause to figure that out.

Inexplicably you seem to be enjoying inspiring emotions in other folks that they are not enjoying.  Why is that?

I feel as if you're not fully open with me, NewLiberty, as if something's ... left unsaid.  If not for your otherwise irreprochable manners, i may have read a hint of anger or even malice into your piqued tone.  Tell me i'm a fool to worry? Huh
MODS.
shitposting sucks

REally?  So what you're saying is this; even if crumbs had not long ago earned his treatment, we should prevent that which comes around from going around because you somehow are innocent, and must deserve to be protected from offense?  Did I get that part right?

I'm just saying, the reputation of she who is offeneded is at least as important as the offenseive material itself; particularly when she isn't the intended target.
833  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 26, 2013, 06:47:24 PM
It will end as all civilised societies ended: with a collapse. I call it Tainter's Law. It ends by the diminishing return on additional investment in additional complexity. The difference to earlier collapses is the fact, that today 500 nuclear reactors will blow its nuclear inventory around the northern part of the planet as soon as nobody will cool them anymore.

This is a rediculous idea.  Again, nuclear power industry accidents across all of the history of the world do not exceed the amount of radioactive material that is launched into the atmostphere by the worlds coal plants in a single year, and we have been burning coal for almost 200 years, and seriously powering industry with it for over 100 years.  Modern nuke plants don't really 'blow', and even if 100 of them had leakage accidents similar to what happened in Japan (very, very unlikely) we still wouldn't exceed what humanity has already dosed our environment with over the past 100+ years.  That plant had a quadruple redundant emergency cooling system, which we now know isn't quite good enough for a 1:10K year tsumami wave.  It's certainly more than enough for a global economic breakdown, since the idea is to give the enginneers time to put the reactor and hot fuel rods into a longer term stable state.  For some designs (undamaged) this simply involves lowering a neutron shield that waits inside the reactor, and the heat level will slowly reduce to the point that additional water supply is no longer pressing.  For some designs this actually requires that some (all?) of the hot fuel be removed by very well trained operators and placed into open storage pools, with or without neutron shielding between the rods.  Most of the open storage pools are not designed to collect rainwater for level maintaince, but do you really think that should it become obvious, the engineers can't arrange such things for most or all of the power plants?

Furthermore, not all radiation, or radioactive materials, are equal risks.  There is a persistant background radiation in our lives that is completely natural, and it's certainly higher than a layman would assume.  All concrete is mildly radioactive for the same reason that all coal is mildly radioactive, because all rocks contain some trace amount of thorium.  It's just that common.
834  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 26, 2013, 06:25:58 PM
Recent post by Dmitry Orlov, highly relevent to this thread.

http://cluborlov.blogspot.com/2013/06/life-outside-mental-comfort-zone.html#more

EDIT:  A quote highly relevent to those who engage in this thread, perhaps myself included...

"the brain of the body politic seems to have had its corpus callosum severed (that's the crossbar switch between the two hemispheres of the brain that allows them to act as a unit). Each side thinks that it represents the whole even as the two sides have all but lost the ability to communicate with each other"
835  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Best/worst places to be in the United States once the USD plummets? on: June 26, 2013, 05:32:14 AM
I would say places that grow food for humans, that is not that corn crap...
Corn, wheat, oats or rice, in the end it's all grass.

Still, I would prefer to be near where something I can eat is grown...

The mass produced corn isn't really too edible...

It's edible. Grind it up into flour and make bread. Also cows...

And chickens.  Corn makes for a fine chicken dinner after about four months.
836  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 26, 2013, 05:30:12 AM

The markets are not about to collapse.  Leaders are making poor decisions, and we pay for that through the erosion we see.  The erosion will continue.

Even places where things are truly bad (and there are many, Syria for example) have not collapsed.




I suppose that it really matter what one means by "collapse".  I'm of the opinion that markets can't collapse by their nature, they either grow or decline, but never cease.  Even the classic 'buggy whip' market never completely died after the invention of the "horseless carriage", as there are still niche markets such as hobby mini-horse carriage racing and the Amish/Anabaptists that require them for practical transportation.  The survivability of markets notwithstanding, your own personal economy could very well 'collapse' if one is not careful.  And there is some risk that it could collapse even if one is careful.  When the bovine fecal matter finally makes contact with the rotary cooling device, I doubt anyone west of The Hamptons is going to completely avoid it.
837  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 25, 2013, 05:57:24 PM
For that matter, one solution is to build caissons on the ocean floor and use power during the day to pump water out and air in to these giant caissons. When you later need that power back out, you start letting water in which pumps air out at very high pressure, driving a generator. Voila, constant power as needed.

Another solution would be to build huge culverts to funnel the Pacific Ocean from San Diego to the Salt Flats, which happens to be about 200' below sea level and was an inland sea itself that finally dried up a few thousand years ago.  A few water turbines near the Salt Flats, and with the evaporation rate of the area, easily 100 Megawatts or more for as long as we like.  More, if we decide that an inland sea would be a good thing to have there.  It would alter the immediate environment, increasing humidity, cloud cover, and rainfall for several hundred miles around.

Not that the NIMBY crowd would let something like that happen either.
838  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 24, 2013, 11:59:45 PM


We will also be able to significantly reverse environmental degradation (including, as a minor aside, powering bitcoin on equipment that is no longer coal-fired).



We've had the technology to do this for forty years.  It's just not being developed, and it won't in the current geopolitical environment.  It's wishful thinking to believe that wind, water and solar are ever going to be able to run our modern industrial economies.  Nuclear power is simply required if we really desire to move away from using coal.
Solar offers more power than we can use. We can even move to harvesting solar in space for literally the foreseeable future.

It will begin to be used when it's cost-effective against other forms of electricity. Which won't likely be very long now. We already have perfect solar antennas that pickup solar energy like an antenna rather than like photosynthesis, and can thereby capture a large percent of the energy efficiently, like 99.5%. What we lack are transistors that can switch fast enough to turn light's AC current into DC current.

Wow. You're response is to cite a theoretical method, and present it as a near term viable solution.  Solar antennas might one day power nanites, but even then the tech might be a bit out of reach.

Quote
So, by roundabout method, the microchip industry will ultimately solve our power problems Tongue

Long term, fusion may pan out also. But I think solar will bridge the gap.

You're dreaming.  TAbletop fusion is closer to a productive stage than solar antenna tech.
839  Other / Politics & Society / Re: Best/worst places to be in the United States once the USD plummets? on: June 24, 2013, 06:13:11 PM
Regarding protein, why not just get it directly from roving mobs and bandits?

Mmmm, Soylent Green....

That thought is like opening up a fortune cookie after a great meal, and all it says is "That wasn't chicken".
840  Economy / Economics / Re: The end is near on: June 24, 2013, 05:21:37 PM


All Patriarchy, which is the collectivist opposite of the non-collectivist Anarchy.
Patriarchal, federalist chiefdoms are not stateless.


I wholely reject your absurd distortion of the terms in use. 

But even then, I can lay one down for you...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iroquois

Yes they were a matrilineal society (and a matriarchial one, IMHO) and yes they did trade internally and externally.

They were stateless, both by the true defintion of the term, and your's as well.
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