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Author Topic: Intellectual Property - In All Fairness!  (Read 96087 times)
NghtRppr
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September 24, 2011, 09:42:16 PM
 #901

You definitely require a sophisticated understanding before you can appreciate subtle and difficult problems.

I agree with this and I have said this to you many times. I've patiently explained to you that you can't slap your political ideology broadly to the world and society and hope it works. I've explained that to you, after it became obvious to me that you lacked a sophisticated understanding of many topics external to your political ideology. I believe the topics were related to deforestation, ecosystems, species decimation, riparian zones, trophic cascades, edge effects, etc.

Thank you for summarizing my viewpoint (and undermining yours) in one succinct sentence.

Of course, I understand your viewpoint. I simply reject it.
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September 24, 2011, 09:43:49 PM
 #902

You definitely require a sophisticated understanding before you can appreciate subtle and difficult problems.

I agree with this and I have said this to you many times. I've patiently explained to you that you can't slap your political ideology broadly to the world and society and hope it works. I've explained that to you, after it became obvious to me that you lacked a sophisticated understanding of many topics external to your political ideology. I believe the topics were related to deforestation, ecosystems, species decimation, riparian zones, trophic cascades, edge effects, etc.

Thank you for summarizing my viewpoint (and undermining yours) in one succinct sentence.

Of course, I understand your viewpoint. I simply reject it.

You reject the importance of having a sophisticated understanding before applying measures to subtle and difficult problems?
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September 24, 2011, 09:57:35 PM
 #903

You definitely require a sophisticated understanding before you can appreciate subtle and difficult problems.

Remember when I said this? Yea, I was the one who explained that to you and you agreed with it. So, clearly, that's not what I reject. I reject the idea that, all things considered, consequences trump rights.
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September 24, 2011, 10:04:18 PM
 #904

You definitely require a sophisticated understanding before you can appreciate subtle and difficult problems.

Remember when I said this? Yea, I was the one who explained that to you and you agreed with it. So, clearly, that's not what I reject. I reject the idea that, all things considered, consequences trump rights.

Let's consider what you want. Basically, it's something to the effect: "Everyone should keep their hands off of others and their property." And then, over the course of some 46 pages in this thread, and many times over in other threads, you argue that above all else, that ideal trumps everything else, indiscriminately.

It seems to me that indiscriminate application of that ideal does in fact, not require a sophisticated understanding of anything else at all. So please demonstrate to me the following:

1. Demonstrate that your ideal does indeed require a sophisticated understanding to appreciate it and apply it to subtle and difficult problems.

2. Demonstrate that you have not shirked the need for a sophisticated understanding when explaining the application of your ideal to subtle and difficult problems.
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September 24, 2011, 10:11:16 PM
 #905

It seems to me that indiscriminate application of that ideal does in fact, not require a sophisticated understanding of anything else at all.

You're right about that and that's the whole point. Rules aren't supposed to be ambiguous and vague. However, understanding why consequences don't trump rights is a different story and that's what I was referring to in my post.
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September 24, 2011, 10:34:06 PM
 #906

We created governments and they implement things we want.  The US won the atom bomb race and American people loved winning WW2.  Don't kid yourself that the governments are separate from us the people.

So... when people want to use nukes against others, all they must do is form a government, and that makes it acceptable?

Here's what I'm seeing in your argument...

Individual acquires nuke - immediate use of violence is acceptable to end this threat
Group of people calling themselves a government acquires nuke (and USES it) - it's ok because it's the will of the people
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September 24, 2011, 10:49:03 PM
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Then determined bombers will make deals with like-minded farmers, or organize a group of like-minded persons to buy smaller quantites across many vendors and time periods so as to avoid raising the red flags.  It is a fatal conceit to assume that this is the reason that car bombs have reduced in the UK.  It may, or may not, be a contributing factor.  Much more likely is that the effectiveness of UK police in undercover operations has identified those who would pursue such tactics and delt with them already or that the grievences against the UK have either been resolved or overshadowed by the grievences against the US and Israel.  Or just simply that the population of would be bombers still free and alive to do such things has been reduced.  Most likely a combination of all these factors, but corrolation is not causation.

With respect, this is not something we need to debate.  It worked.  Immediately.  The bombers didn't go away and when Libya sent supplies of Semtex they were a nightmare again.  But fertiliser based bombs were dealt with.  

It demeans your logic when you try to ignore facts.  Just saying....

Present your facts, or they didn't happen.

If I do prove to you that regulating the sale of fertiliser has saved lives, do you then accept that it makes sense to regulate it?

Corrolation is not causation, so I don't think that you can prove any such thing; but it would still depend upon how it's regulated.  It's not an all or nothing question.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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September 24, 2011, 11:04:25 PM
 #908

Correlation is not causation, so I don't think that you can prove any such thing; but it would still depend upon how it's regulated.  It's not an all or nothing question.

Under what circumstances would one regulate any weapon, in your opinion? More specifically, why would anyone regulate anything, unless there was imminent threat of violence or unless violence had already been committed?

What exactly constitutes a weapon anyway?

Do we need specific laws to account for weapon use for all persons in all places, or can they be handled on a case-by-case basis?

Every conflict scenario is unique, with a unique set of circumstances, intentions, and evidence. How could any law regulating weapons be realistically applicable and equitable in all situations and not violate personal liberties?

EDIT: Actually if you think about it, nobody regulates weapons, they regulate people. I continually read comments in this thread that we should regulate fertilizer sales, or nuclear ordinances, smallpox, toxic materials, and whatnot, when what we're really doing is regulating individual liberties and actions.

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September 24, 2011, 11:25:06 PM
 #909

This thread has devolved into two ideological camps, neither of which is willing to concede that the other has a point.  Nor does either side seem to wish to acknowledge that the contrived situations presented to argue over have little bearing on reality.  I'm sorry, but not only is a libertarian not going to really sit idle should some knife juggler stand up in the inflatable life raft; but nor does the concept that liberty should trump consequences rationally lead to a crazy little old lady buying a sachel nuke on her retirement savings in order to go commit a suicide bombing of the Upper West Side.  I'm most certainly libertarian, and thus lean to one side in the debate, but both sides have run to the absurd.

And as I have already noted, trolls don't argue for the sake of enlightening others nor of self enrichment.  And too many of those members who are still here posting have let the caged troll out to play.  Anyone who would follow AyeYo to a new venue is asking to get hurt, because he does so because he knows that the stated rules at the other forum either are notoriously underenforced, or simply don't apply to himself for whatever reason.  Added to that, the open knowledge that I'm watching him in particular (which is what brought me to this thread, for I'm not keen on debating IP with anyone) means that he is at an advantage anywhere else, no matter to what length I may be willing to let him go.  He can go farther if he isn't insulting actual moderators.  I know I'm picking on AyeYo here, but there are many others in this thread who have been acting likewise.  And yes, I'm including members who agree with myself idealogically in that group.  I'm the first to admit that I have allowed myself to get pulled into this kind of intellectual gutter in the past, so I'm not innocent either.  But you guys need to pull yourselves out of the sewage, climb back out of the gutter and mentally step back from each other. 

To sum it up, stop it.  Everybody find a corner to stand in for a time out.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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September 24, 2011, 11:36:36 PM
 #910

I'm sorry, but not only is a libertarian not going to really sit idle should some knife juggler stand up in the inflatable life raft...

I've already acknowledged this. I made a very apt analogy. Is a libertarian starving and lost in the woods going to simply wait to die instead of violating property rights by breaking into the cabin full of food? No, but at no point does justice get thrown out the window. Even if how we feel we would behave would become ambiguous under various circumstances, justice does not. You still broke into a cabin. You still stole food that you didn't own. You committed a crime and your punishment is the same as ever. You have to pay for the damages and the stolen food. You don't get a free pass on justice just because it's an emergency. Likewise, would a libertarian watch a guy juggle knives on an inflatable raft instead of stopping him? No, that's about as likely as a libertarian starving to death outside a cabin full of food. Libertarianism is not a suicide pact. However, in both cases, justice still has to have its due. You must eventually settle up with the law. The only confusion here is that some people think what's rational to do under certain circumstances and what justice requires us to do are always identical.
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September 25, 2011, 12:16:00 AM
 #911

If you look at the progression of regulation, you'll notice where it starts and where it eventually ends.

I agree that we should look at the consequences, or the outcomes of all undesirable situations. That's natural to do. Nobody wants to live in fear of their lives constantly, or feel that they have to "walk on egg shells" because the neighbor is well armed and seems a bit "off".

Notwithstanding that, what typically happens when a negative event happens, is we get angry and upset at the criminal, and we want justice. That's reasonable. Every political ideology (PI) deals with that to some extent in a reasoned fashion, at least when cooler heads prevail. But we don't stop there, we look to see if there is a way to avert disaster of a similar type ever again. It's at this point where almost all PIs diverge. Some will say it is a freak accident due to mental incapacity, others will blame the victim for inciting a reaction, or that the criminal had a negative upbringing and so on and so forth.

Some even take it a step further. They look to the unique circumstances and context of the crime. They say, "Well look what weapon he used. If he hadn't had that weapon, then the victim would have had a better chance, or avoided being victimized at all". Now we're starting to tread muddy waters. We start debating whether or not the outcome would have been the same, had the weapon been different somehow. That type of argumentation I think serves little purpose, because you can't roll the clock back.

It ultimately leads to deciding (rather arbitrarily now) that the personal liberties of other individuals (not the criminal in this instance) no longer have precedence because "society" has decided for them. Society is now the deliberating body who decides for others how they may or may not defend themselves, or what type of property they may possess. Their personal liberties have, in some subtle way, been delegated to others for this determination. We really can't say that those designated persons are any more qualified to possess and use weapons than anybody else, but we've given them these titles, distinctions, and powers anyway.

All men are fallible, some more than others I suppose, but the fact that we can't decide for ourselves on how we want to direct our actions and the more we rely on our leaders, seemingly the more complacent we become. What appears to happen is that weapons and defense accumulate to the few, and leave the many to rely, almost solely on law enforcement. Some don't even try to arm themselves because the laws make it difficult to do so, or impossible in some instances. Criminals know this. They prey on that fact. There are only so many "protectors" to go around. This feedback loop between criminal and government goes on for awhile until most objects deemed "dangerous" (almost anything can be used as a weapon eventually) become regulated and only our law enforcement is empowered to do anything about it. Our saviors to the rescue (sarcasm).

Ultimately and finally, when the masses are disarmed, it's very easy to herd them in the direction you want them, and then almost anything goes at this point. The whims of the masses push back and forth, grinding and haltingly into a unrecognizable tangled morass. Lawyers and politicians love this -it keeps them in business- and at the same time, amazingly gives them the aura of the "fix-it guy" who can solve your problems, albeit for a very short lived period of time; but it keeps them entertained and placated I suppose.

But even the "common man" isn't that ignorant and eventually catches on. Unfortunately, at this point "might makes right" and the anointed ones and the ivory towers in which they reside, are the only deciding factions left. And they are well bunkered in. I can see the writing on the wall too. If you can regulate nukes, then why not semtex, or fertilizer, or handguns, or knife length, or... or how about a lemonade stand? Yeah, I know you say it would never happen. Calling me a liar? Been there, seen that.

It has happened in the past, it will happen again. The past is prologue.

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September 25, 2011, 12:42:26 AM
 #912

But even the "common man" isn't that ignorant and eventually catches on. Unfortunately, at this point "might makes right" and the anointed ones and the ivory towers in which they reside, are the only deciding factions left. And they are well bunkered in. I can see the writing on the wall too. If you can regulate nukes, then why not semtex, or fertilizer, or handguns, or knife length, or... or how about a lemonade stand? Yeah, I know you say it would never happen. Calling me a liar? Been there, seen that.

It has happened in the past, it will happen again. The past is prologue.

All that you said has valid points. But last time I checked, nukes have been regulated for pretty much as long as they've been around, and it hasn't led to any attempts at kitchen knife regulation (accept on airplanes), which frankly, sounds reasonable to me.

I have zero problems with all citizens not being allowed to ever own a nuke. Zero.
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September 25, 2011, 01:25:03 AM
 #913

But even the "common man" isn't that ignorant and eventually catches on. Unfortunately, at this point "might makes right" and the anointed ones and the ivory towers in which they reside, are the only deciding factions left. And they are well bunkered in. I can see the writing on the wall too. If you can regulate nukes, then why not semtex, or fertilizer, or handguns, or knife length, or... or how about a lemonade stand? Yeah, I know you say it would never happen. Calling me a liar? Been there, seen that.

It has happened in the past, it will happen again. The past is prologue.

All that you said has valid points. But last time I checked, nukes have been regulated for pretty much as long as they've been around, and it hasn't led to any attempts at kitchen knife regulation (accept on airplanes), which frankly, sounds reasonable to me.

I have zero problems with all citizens not being allowed to ever own a nuke. Zero.

The nuke thing is an extreme case.  It doesn't say anything really.  How about a cannon?  Can a citizen own a cannon?  If not, why not?  What about dynamite?  Black powder?  How large of a firearm is too large, and why?  You never really did address this before.

"The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank...sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."

- Carroll Quigley, CFR member, mentor to Bill Clinton, from 'Tragedy And Hope'
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September 25, 2011, 01:39:21 AM
 #914

The nuke thing is an extreme case.  It doesn't say anything really. 

It says a lot given that the last 20 pages or so have posts in which a few members seem to adamantly insist that there should be no regulation of nukes. Precisely because it is extreme (individuals don't really need them and they cause horrific damage), it becomes telling that a select few think they should not be regulated.

Quote
How about a cannon?  Can a citizen own a cannon?  If not, why not?  What about dynamite?  Black powder?  How large of a firearm is too large, and why?  You never really did address this before.

I think antique cannons should be allowed. Just a hunch. As for the other stuff, I honestly don't know what the existing precise regulations are, but I believe in studying each individual case and determining something that strikes some type of balance, admitting and fully accepting that everyone will not be pleased. But that's ok, because in liber-land, obviously not everybody will be pleased either.

Once you accept that not everyone will be pleased no matter what solution is applied, it becomes clear that classifying items into different groups and applying solutions individually to those different groups is an acceptable method, rather than insisting that one simple rule applies to everything, which obviously results in situations that just aren't acceptable.
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September 25, 2011, 01:52:46 AM
 #915

But even the "common man" isn't that ignorant and eventually catches on. Unfortunately, at this point "might makes right" and the anointed ones and the ivory towers in which they reside, are the only deciding factions left. And they are well bunkered in. I can see the writing on the wall too. If you can regulate nukes, then why not semtex, or fertilizer, or handguns, or knife length, or... or how about a lemonade stand? Yeah, I know you say it would never happen. Calling me a liar? Been there, seen that.

It has happened in the past, it will happen again. The past is prologue.

All that you said has valid points. But last time I checked, nukes have been regulated for pretty much as long as they've been around, and it hasn't led to any attempts at kitchen knife regulation (accept on airplanes), which frankly, sounds reasonable to me.

I have zero problems with all citizens not being allowed to ever own a nuke. Zero.

The nuke thing is an extreme case.  It doesn't say anything really.  How about a cannon?  Can a citizen own a cannon?  If not, why not?  What about dynamite?  Black powder?  How large of a firearm is too large, and why?  You never really did address this before.


In the US we're allowed weapons that could be reasonably used for self-defense.  Read the majority opinion in DC vs. Heller if you want the specific defintion and where the lines are drawn.

Nukes aren't reasonable self-defense weapons.  Conventional bombs are not self-defense weapons.  Cannons are not self-defense weapons.  RPGs are not self-defense weapons. etc. etc. etc. etc.



So cash boy, are you signing up on Honda-Tech or not?  As mo(r)onshadow has correctly pointed out, and as I explained to you before, the debate here is pointless.  If you want to demonstrate that your opinions are superior, then go do so in front of some fresh faces and see how they react.  It's not a popularity contest, it's the real world.  If you want your nutty ideas to ever see the light of day, you need to sell them to people and convince the masses that your belief system is the superior one.  If you ever want that to happen, you need to pry yourself away from circle jerk sub-sections of this forum where most people agree with you and go sell your ideas to fresh faces.

In that regard, I'm actually in the same boat as you.  My ideas are also seen as crazy by a country that is predominantly far-right authoritarian, religious nut cases that worship the US military and are blissfully.... no, more like orgasmically ignorant of history and anything not covered by Fox News.  The difference between you and I is that I choose to surround myself by these people so that I can educate them, sway them over to my way of thinking, and also through their counter-arguments, strengthen, examine, and reflect on my own beliefs, often modifying them where they prove to be illogical.  You, on the other hand, choose to surround yourself with like-mind people, which is essentially burying your head in the sand.  You know you can't adequately defend your beliefs, maybe you're even afraid of beginning to question them, so you stick to pumping yourself full of world-view affirming literature and surrounding yourself with people that think exactly like you.  If you truly like your way is not only the best way, but also a realistic and workable way for the world, then stop hiding behind "me too" people and go out and start winning strangers to your cause.

Enjoying the dose of reality or getting a laugh out of my posts? Feel free to toss me a penny or two, everyone else seems to be doing it! 1Kn8NqvbCC83zpvBsKMtu4sjso5PjrQEu1
NghtRppr
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September 25, 2011, 01:53:01 AM
 #916

As for the other stuff, I honestly don't know what the existing precise regulations are, but I believe in studying each individual case and determining something that strikes some type of balance, admitting and fully accepting that everyone will not be pleased.

What kind of balance? What guides you? Whatever tickles your fancy? Popular opinion? The alignment of the stars?
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September 25, 2011, 01:55:21 AM
 #917

Once you accept that not everyone will be pleased no matter what solution is applied,


The just CAN'T wrap their minds around this.

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September 25, 2011, 01:58:44 AM
 #918

As for the other stuff, I honestly don't know what the existing precise regulations are, but I believe in studying each individual case and determining something that strikes some type of balance, admitting and fully accepting that everyone will not be pleased.

What kind of balance? What guides you? Whatever tickles your fancy? Popular opinion? The alignment of the stars?

Not necessarily any of those. In the case of the nukes, common sense guides me. In the case of the environment, knowledge that others don't bother to arm themselves with. Never the alignment of the stars. Never what tickles my fancy - unless it is coincident with well thought out and researched conclusions.

Balance is important.

Now, the last paragraph that AyeYo just wrote (in his longer post above) - consider it to be good advice, even if you find him abrasive.
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September 25, 2011, 02:03:35 AM
 #919

As for the other stuff, I honestly don't know what the existing precise regulations are, but I believe in studying each individual case and determining something that strikes some type of balance, admitting and fully accepting that everyone will not be pleased.

What kind of balance? What guides you? Whatever tickles your fancy? Popular opinion? The alignment of the stars?


Why do you ask stupid questions like this when you openly admit that your ideas are just some undefendable randomness you pulled out of your ass?

Hawker has repeated asked you to explain what logic drives your world-view and how you justify your beliefs, but you refuse to answer.... and then you turn around and ask someone else the same questions.

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September 25, 2011, 02:03:53 AM
 #920

In that regard, I'm actually in the same boat as you.  My ideas are also seen as crazy by a country that is predominantly far-right authoritarian, religious nut cases that worship the US military and are blissfully.... no, more like orgasmically ignorant of history and anything not covered by Fox News.  The difference between you and I is that I choose to surround myself by these people so that I can educate them, sway them over to my way of thinking, and also through their counter-arguments, strengthen, examine, and reflect on my own beliefs, often modifying them where they prove to be illogical.  You, on the other hand, choose to surround yourself with like-mind people, which is essentially burying your head in the sand.  You know you can't adequately defend your beliefs, maybe you're even afraid of beginning to question them, so you stick to pumping yourself full of world-view affirming literature and surrounding yourself with people that think exactly like you.  If you truly like your way is not only the best way, but also a realistic and workable way for the world, then stop hiding behind "me too" people and go out and start winning strangers to your cause.

Nothing is more satisfying than having an effect - getting people who think they believe what they believe, but getting them to understand that what they believe is not the best way, usually because they're unaware of all the consequences of their beliefs.
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