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Author Topic: This frozen chicken “had a rich, emotional life.”  (Read 16701 times)
Hippie Tech
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July 17, 2015, 11:44:15 PM
 #221

I am totally NOT against the idea of some group of scientists actually finding a possible method or complete scenario or complete flow regarding evolution. While I am not actually hoping for it, I certainly wouldn't mind if somebody found a complete way that evolution could have happened, from the start of inorganic to life, to the life that we have today. In fact, I would like it if several of these methods were found.

It would prove that God had created mankind so great that they could even find out how to make life evolve. Of course, then there would be the problem of proving that evolution actually did the job, and not God.

Smiley

Tell you what, why not rewrite the bible (which is okay because it's been done before) and add a bit of evolution into the story line.
You can then fully believe the theory 100%. Cheesy



The Bible does not mention darwin's theory but I would (personally) read this as if a man was trying to explain to an ant what the fabric of life was 'coming from', atomic dust particles:

By the sweat of your face you shall eat bread, till you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken; for you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”


Are we really all made of stardust?


That will be it as far as my Sunday's teaching...

 Cheesy





Earth dust, like the stars are.

Smiley

We are ugly bags of mostly starwater. Wink
https://youtu.be/gBuyqM5u2GY

Which btw, has memory and structure.
https://youtu.be/YwaNfNcurvQ

Now think about what that dark pagan blood ritual sacrifice/ dinner is doing to your body's water.

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July 17, 2015, 11:59:03 PM
 #222

I am totally NOT against the idea of some group of scientists actually finding a possible method or complete scenario or complete flow regarding evolution. While I am not actually hoping for it, I certainly wouldn't mind if somebody found a complete way that evolution could have happened, from the start of inorganic to life, to the life that we have today. In fact, I would like it if several of these methods were found.

It would prove that God had created mankind so great that they could even find out how to make life evolve. Of course, then there would be the problem of proving that evolution actually did the job, and not God.

Smiley

Tell you what, why not rewrite the bible (which is okay because it's been done before) and add a bit of evolution into the story line.
You can then fully believe the theory 100%. Cheesy



The Bible does not mention darwin's theory but I would (personally) read this as if a man was trying to explain to an ant what the fabric of life was 'coming from', atomic dust particles:

By the sweat of your face you shall eat bread, till you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken; for you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”


Are we really all made of stardust?


That will be it as far as my Sunday's teaching...

 Cheesy





Earth dust, like the stars are.

Smiley

We are ugly bags of mostly starwater. Wink
https://youtu.be/gBuyqM5u2GY

Which btw, has memory and structure.
https://youtu.be/YwaNfNcurvQ

Now think about what that dark pagan blood ritual sacrifice/ dinner is doing to your body's water.

All I meant is, that when you read the account of the creation in Genesis in the Bible, it seems to say that all material in the universe was one big chunk. Then God separated it into whatever different kinds of bodies exist in all space. But... when God does this, He does it from a standpoint of the earth, that all the materials came from the earth, this earth.

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August 24, 2015, 02:49:38 AM
 #223




Why salad is so overrated



As the world population grows, we have a pressing need to eat better and farm better, and those of us trying to figure out how to do those things have pointed at lots of different foods as problematic. Almonds, for their water use. Corn, for the monoculture. Beef, for its greenhouse gases. In each of those cases, there’s some truth in the finger-pointing, but none of them is a clear-cut villain.

There’s one food, though, that has almost nothing going for it. It occupies precious crop acreage, requires fossil fuels to be shipped, refrigerated, around the world, and adds nothing but crunch to the plate.

It’s salad, and here are three main reasons why we need to rethink it.

Salad vegetables are pitifully low in nutrition. The biggest thing wrong with salads is lettuce, and the biggest thing wrong with lettuce is that it’s a leafy-green waste of resources.

In July, when I wrote a piece defending corn on the calories-per-acre metric, a number of people wrote to tell me I was ignoring nutrition. Which I was. Not because nutrition isn’t important, but because we get all the nutrition we need in a fraction of our recommended daily calories, and filling in the rest of the day’s food is a job for crops like corn. But if you think nutrition is the most important metric, don’t direct your ire at corn. Turn instead to lettuce.

One of the people I heard from about nutrition is organic consultant Charles Benbrook. He and colleague Donald Davis developed a nutrient quality index — a way to rate foods based on how much of 27 nutrients they contain per 100 calories. Four of the five lowest-ranking foods (by serving size) are salad ingredients: cucumbers, radishes, lettuce and celery. (The fifth is eggplant.)

Those foods’ nutritional profile can be partly explained by one simple fact: They’re almost all water. Although water figures prominently in just about every vegetable (the sweet potato, one of the least watery, is 77 percent), those four salad vegetables top the list at 95 to 97 percent water. A head of iceberg lettuce has the same water content as a bottle of Evian (1-liter size: 96 percent water, 4 percent bottle) and is only marginally more nutritious.

Take collard greens. They are 90 percent water, which still sounds like a lot. But it means that, compared with lettuce, every pound of collard greens contains about twice as much stuff that isn’t water, which, of course, is where the nutrition lives. But you’re also likely to eat much more of them, because you cook them. A large serving of lettuce feels like a bona fide vegetable, but when you saute it (not that I’m recommending that), you’ll see that two cups of romaine cooks down to a bite or two.

The corollary to the nutrition problem is the expense problem. The makings of a green salad — say, a head of lettuce, a cucumber and a bunch of radishes — cost about $3 at my supermarket. For that, I could buy more than two pounds of broccoli, sweet potatoes or just about any frozen vegetable going, any of which would make for a much more nutritious side dish to my roast chicken.

Lettuce is a vehicle to transport refrigerated water from farm to table. When we switch to vegetables that are twice as nutritious — like those collards or tomatoes or green beans — not only do we free up half the acres now growing lettuce, we cut back on the fossil fuels and other resources needed for transport and storage.

Save the planet, skip the salad.

Salad fools dieters into making bad choices. Lots of what passes for salad in restaurants is just the same as the rest of the calorie-dense diabolically palatable food that’s making us fat, but with a few lettuce leaves tossed in. Next time you order a salad, engage in a little thought experiment: Picture the salad without the lettuce, cucumber and radish, which are nutritionally and calorically irrelevant. Is it a little pile of croutons and cheese, with a few carrot shavings and lots of ranch dressing?

Call something “salad,” and it immediately acquires what Pierre Chandon calls a “health halo.” Chandon, professor of marketing at INSEAD, an international business school in Fontainebleau, France, says that once people have the idea it’s good for them, they stop paying attention “to its actual nutritional content or, even worse, to its portion size.”

I won’t be the first to point out that items labeled “salad” at chain restaurants are often as bad, if not worse, than pastas or sandwiches or burgers when it comes to calories. Take Applebee’s, where the Oriental Chicken Salad clocks in at 1,400 calories, and the grilled version is only 110 calories lighter. Even the Grilled Chicken Caesar, the least calorific of the salads on the regular menu, is 800 calories.

Of course, salad isn’t always a bad choice, and Applebee’s has a selection of special menu items under 550 calories (many chain restaurants have a similar menu category). Applebee’s Thai Chicken Salad is only 390 calories (although it has more sodium than the Oriental Chicken Salad). Other chains, like relative newcomer Sweetgreen, have a good selection of salads that go further toward earning their health halo: more actual vegetables, less fried stuff.

I asked Bret Thorn, columnist at Nation’s Restaurant News and longtime observer of the restaurant industry, about salads. “Chefs are cognizant of what’s going on in the psychology of diners,” he said. “They’re doing a kind of psychological health washing,” not just with salads, but with labels like “fresh” and “natural,” and foods that are “local” and “seasonal.” “A chef is not a nutritionist, or public health advocate,” Thorn points out. “They make food that customers want to buy.”

And we want to buy things that are fried or creamy or salty or sweet, or all of those things. Which doesn’t mean that the right salad can’t be a good choice for a nutritious meal. It just means that it’s easy to get snookered.

Salad has unfortunate repercussions in our food supply. Lettuce has a couple of No. 1 unenviable rankings in the food world. For starters, it’s the top source of food waste, vegetable division, becoming more than 1 billion pounds of uneaten salad every year. But it’s also the chief culprit for foodborne illnesses. According to the Centers for Disease Control, green leafies accounted for 22 percent of all food-borne illnesses from 1998-2008.

To be fair, “leafy vegetables,” the CDC category, also includes cabbage, spinach and other kinds of greens, but the reason the category dominates is that the greens are often eaten raw. As in salad.

None of this is to say that salad doesn’t have a role in our food supply. I like salad, and there’s been many a time a big bowl of salad on the dinner table has kept me from a second helping of lasagna. The salads we make at home aren’t the same as the ones we buy in restaurants; according to the recipe app Yummly, its collection of lettuce-based salads average 398 calories per serving (although a few do get up into Oriental Chicken territory).

An iceberg wedge, with radishes and bacon and blue-cheese dressing, is something I certainly have no plans to give up. But as we look for ways to rejigger our food supply to grow crops responsibly and feed people nutritiously, maybe we should stop thinking about salad as a wholesome staple, and start thinking about it as a resource-hungry luxury.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/why-salad-is-so-overrated/2015/08/21/ecc03d7a-4677-11e5-8ab4-c73967a143d3_story.html


BADecker
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August 24, 2015, 03:03:44 PM
 #224


Why salad is so overrated


It's not. Phytonutrients. We need them, if only in miniscule amounts. They come from salads and other sources.

One of the problems keeping us from living an exceedingly long, healthy life is that we don't get enough varieties of phytonutrients. There are millions of "varieties" of phytonutrients in the world. There are probably many forms that have been lost off the planet as plant species die off and are lost. Each of these is different, and each contributes to health in its own way. None is unnecessary. Sure, the body has work-arounds. But eventually we die, partly because of the lack of certain phytonutrients from green plants... salads.

The problem isn't the so-called uselessness of salads. The problem is the lack of higher quantities of the nutrients in the salads to make up for the phytonutrients that have been lost due to plants becoming extinct.

One company called AIM International (http://www.theaimcompanies.com/) sells a product they call BarleyLife. This product essentially is barley grass juice that has been dehydrated in such a way that the phyto- and other nutrients remain active.

There are other companies that are using this process with all kinds of food plants. Another is VEDEN (http://www.veden.com/). Their flagship product, VEDEN, is a combination of all kinds of plant foods, salad plants included, reduced to concentrated powder form.

It isn't that salad foods are not good for us. The problem is the lack of varieties, which can be made up somewhat by consuming much more of what is available.

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August 24, 2015, 03:38:29 PM
 #225


Why salad is so overrated


It's not. Phytonutrients. We need them, if only in miniscule amounts. They come from salads and other sources.

One of the problems keeping us from living an exceedingly long, healthy life is that we don't get enough varieties of phytonutrients. There are millions of "varieties" of phytonutrients in the world. There are probably many forms that have been lost off the planet as plant species die off and are lost. Each of these is different, and each contributes to health in its own way. None is unnecessary. Sure, the body has work-arounds. But eventually we die, partly because of the lack of certain phytonutrients from green plants... salads.

The problem isn't the so-called uselessness of salads. The problem is the lack of higher quantities of the nutrients in the salads to make up for the phytonutrients that have been lost due to plants becoming extinct.

One company called AIM International (http://www.theaimcompanies.com/) sells a product they call BarleyLife. This product essentially is barley grass juice that has been dehydrated in such a way that the phyto- and other nutrients remain active.

There are other companies that are using this process with all kinds of food plants. Another is VEDEN (http://www.veden.com/). Their flagship product, VEDEN, is a combination of all kinds of plant foods, salad plants included, reduced to concentrated powder form.

It isn't that salad foods are not good for us. The problem is the lack of varieties, which can be made up somewhat by consuming much more of what is available.

Smiley


The easiest way for me to boost the amount of phytochemicals in my body: I bought a blendtec...


 Wink

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August 24, 2015, 07:22:11 PM
 #226


Why salad is so overrated


It's not. Phytonutrients. We need them, if only in miniscule amounts. They come from salads and other sources.

One of the problems keeping us from living an exceedingly long, healthy life is that we don't get enough varieties of phytonutrients. There are millions of "varieties" of phytonutrients in the world. There are probably many forms that have been lost off the planet as plant species die off and are lost. Each of these is different, and each contributes to health in its own way. None is unnecessary. Sure, the body has work-arounds. But eventually we die, partly because of the lack of certain phytonutrients from green plants... salads.

The problem isn't the so-called uselessness of salads. The problem is the lack of higher quantities of the nutrients in the salads to make up for the phytonutrients that have been lost due to plants becoming extinct.

One company called AIM International (http://www.theaimcompanies.com/) sells a product they call BarleyLife. This product essentially is barley grass juice that has been dehydrated in such a way that the phyto- and other nutrients remain active.

There are other companies that are using this process with all kinds of food plants. Another is VEDEN (http://www.veden.com/). Their flagship product, VEDEN, is a combination of all kinds of plant foods, salad plants included, reduced to concentrated powder form.

It isn't that salad foods are not good for us. The problem is the lack of varieties, which can be made up somewhat by consuming much more of what is available.

Smiley


The easiest way for me to boost the amount of phytochemicals in my body: I bought a blendtec...


 Wink



Sorry. Not concentrated enough. In the distant past, the earth was so healthy, and the plants were abounding with so much nutrition, that people were healthy enough to live for hundreds of years.

Smiley
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August 24, 2015, 09:46:16 PM
 #227


Why salad is so overrated


It's not. Phytonutrients. We need them, if only in miniscule amounts. They come from salads and other sources.

One of the problems keeping us from living an exceedingly long, healthy life is that we don't get enough varieties of phytonutrients. There are millions of "varieties" of phytonutrients in the world. There are probably many forms that have been lost off the planet as plant species die off and are lost. Each of these is different, and each contributes to health in its own way. None is unnecessary. Sure, the body has work-arounds. But eventually we die, partly because of the lack of certain phytonutrients from green plants... salads.

The problem isn't the so-called uselessness of salads. The problem is the lack of higher quantities of the nutrients in the salads to make up for the phytonutrients that have been lost due to plants becoming extinct.

One company called AIM International (http://www.theaimcompanies.com/) sells a product they call BarleyLife. This product essentially is barley grass juice that has been dehydrated in such a way that the phyto- and other nutrients remain active.

There are other companies that are using this process with all kinds of food plants. Another is VEDEN (http://www.veden.com/). Their flagship product, VEDEN, is a combination of all kinds of plant foods, salad plants included, reduced to concentrated powder form.

It isn't that salad foods are not good for us. The problem is the lack of varieties, which can be made up somewhat by consuming much more of what is available.

Smiley


The easiest way for me to boost the amount of phytochemicals in my body: I bought a blendtec...


 Wink



Sorry. Not concentrated enough. In the distant past, the earth was so healthy, and the plants were abounding with so much nutrition, that people were healthy enough to live for hundreds of years.

Smiley


Get one, not Vitamix. You won't regret it, not even in a hundred years.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOTleF3WAMU

 Smiley

BADecker
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August 25, 2015, 01:48:52 AM
 #228


Why salad is so overrated


It's not. Phytonutrients. We need them, if only in miniscule amounts. They come from salads and other sources.

One of the problems keeping us from living an exceedingly long, healthy life is that we don't get enough varieties of phytonutrients. There are millions of "varieties" of phytonutrients in the world. There are probably many forms that have been lost off the planet as plant species die off and are lost. Each of these is different, and each contributes to health in its own way. None is unnecessary. Sure, the body has work-arounds. But eventually we die, partly because of the lack of certain phytonutrients from green plants... salads.

The problem isn't the so-called uselessness of salads. The problem is the lack of higher quantities of the nutrients in the salads to make up for the phytonutrients that have been lost due to plants becoming extinct.

One company called AIM International (http://www.theaimcompanies.com/) sells a product they call BarleyLife. This product essentially is barley grass juice that has been dehydrated in such a way that the phyto- and other nutrients remain active.

There are other companies that are using this process with all kinds of food plants. Another is VEDEN (http://www.veden.com/). Their flagship product, VEDEN, is a combination of all kinds of plant foods, salad plants included, reduced to concentrated powder form.

It isn't that salad foods are not good for us. The problem is the lack of varieties, which can be made up somewhat by consuming much more of what is available.

Smiley


The easiest way for me to boost the amount of phytochemicals in my body: I bought a blendtec...


 Wink



Sorry. Not concentrated enough. In the distant past, the earth was so healthy, and the plants were abounding with so much nutrition, that people were healthy enough to live for hundreds of years.

Smiley


Get one, not Vitamix. You won't regret it, not even in a hundred years.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOTleF3WAMU

 Smiley



A blender, even a good one, won't help much with getting more nutrients. The best it will do is aid in digestion a little. The thing we need is concentrated nutrients, so we can actually get more of what we need. VEDEN.

Smiley
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August 26, 2015, 08:55:53 AM
 #229

Of course, why only blend vegetables and fruit? Chicken and other meats blend very well in some blenders. Think of making vegetable meat mush in your blender. Very tasty, and already chewed for you. Works exceptionally well for people who haven't made it to the dentist in a while, but really need to go.

 Cheesy
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August 26, 2015, 01:38:48 PM
 #230

Of course, why only blend vegetables and fruit? Chicken and other meats blend very well in some blenders. Think of making vegetable meat mush in your blender. Very tasty, and already chewed for you. Works exceptionally well for people who haven't made it to the dentist in a while, but really need to go.

 Cheesy

http://www.blendtec.com/warranty?gclid=CK6EjJnvxscCFdgSgQodbWoPhg

No. I do not work nor get a commission from them...

 Smiley

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August 26, 2015, 04:31:46 PM
 #231

Of course, why only blend vegetables and fruit? Chicken and other meats blend very well in some blenders. Think of making vegetable meat mush in your blender. Very tasty, and already chewed for you. Works exceptionally well for people who haven't made it to the dentist in a while, but really need to go.

 Cheesy

Greetings blood thirsty savages. Smiley

You underestimate the flesh tearing capabilities of human gums. Tongue




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August 26, 2015, 04:52:23 PM
 #232


one day we will evolve past food in the current format, at the moment i dont know how some poor city located family would attempt a vegetarian diet.

I really hope it will be much healthier, and not that gmo crap,or a world where you take your kids to McDonalds for daily lunch.
No real chicken at those places.
Fruit and veg is my type of food with the occasional chicken.


Americans buy more chicken than any other food at the center of the plate. Chicken consumption per capita has increased nearly every year since the mid 1960’s, while red meat consumption has steadily declined.

Could you imagine what world consumption is.

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August 26, 2015, 05:00:34 PM
 #233

Again, another imposing alien beliefs and the will (vegetarianism), no good will not.  Undecided
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August 26, 2015, 05:06:32 PM
 #234

Of course, why only blend vegetables and fruit? Chicken and other meats blend very well in some blenders. Think of making vegetable meat mush in your blender. Very tasty, and already chewed for you. Works exceptionally well for people who haven't made it to the dentist in a while, but really need to go.

 Cheesy

Greetings blood thirsty savages. Smiley

You underestimate the flesh tearing capabilities of human gums. Tongue







You have a nice family album there. Thank you for sharing...

 Smiley


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August 27, 2015, 05:18:16 PM
 #235

Well i can't imagine my life without meat. Not any kind of meat though, only farm raised. In my country there are many farms and the animals on those farm eat grass and natural food, not some chemically made food so the animal for example a pig will gain 100 kilograms in a month.
Also, there are many hungry people on this planet, first find a way how to feed them and than try to fight for the animal right.
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August 27, 2015, 09:24:16 PM
 #236

Well i can't imagine my life without meat. Not any kind of meat though, only farm raised. In my country there are many farms and the animals on those farm eat grass and natural food, not some chemically made food so the animal for example a pig will gain 100 kilograms in a month.
Also, there are many hungry people on this planet, first find a way how to feed them and than try to fight for the animal right.

Well, be sure to thaw this frozen chicken out before you cook it.    Cheesy
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September 14, 2015, 09:19:17 AM
 #237

We as a society will not respect the rights of animals because we don't recognize human rights properly yet.

Sometimes, I look back at my posts and think about how intelligent I was back then, what happened?

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September 14, 2015, 02:34:34 PM
 #238

We as a society will not respect the rights of animals because we don't recognize human rights properly yet.

Sometimes, I look back at my posts and think about how intelligent I was back then, what happened?

Sometimes I consider my previous posts and think about how much the threads in here have clarified my thinking for myself, and the way to express such thinking.

Smiley
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September 14, 2015, 02:42:49 PM
 #239

We as a society will not respect the rights of animals because we don't recognize human rights properly yet.

Sometimes, I look back at my posts and think about how intelligent I was back then, what happened?

Sometimes I consider my previous posts and think about how much the threads in here have clarified my thinking for myself, and the way to express such thinking.

Smiley

Oh my god, same!

It's especially fun to do on forums

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September 14, 2015, 02:43:08 PM
 #240

We as a society will not respect the rights of animals because we don't recognize human rights properly yet.

True. But what are animal rights? Aren't animal rights in the wild simply the way animals instinctively act under whatever circumstances they find themselves in, according to their nature? And in captivity, aren't animal rights completely subservient to their owners' authority in every way?

A merciful owner has mercy on his animals, and even love for them. If he eats them, he kills them swiftly so that they feel little pain.

If a society restricts its members from eating animals or treating their animal property how they want, it is a society of slavery among people. In a land of freedom, people have right to do with their animal property and other property as they desire. It is when people do NOT have freedom to do with their animal property what they want, that people are like animals before their society or government.

Since society and government are made up of people, what gives them the right to decide how other people should treat their own property?

Smiley
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